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Cornell University Library 
JX 9161876 
V.4 
A collection of treaties, engagements, a 




3 1924 007 471 935 ......i 




The original of tiiis book is in 
tine Cornell University Library. 

There are no known copyright restrictions in 
the United States on the use of the text. 



http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924007471935 



A COLLECTION 



TREATIES, ENGAGEMENTS, AND SUNNUDS 



EELAIINa TO 



INDIA AND NEIGHBOURING COUNTRIES. 



COMPILED BY 



C. U. AITCHISON, B.C.S., 

UNDEE-SECKETAET TO THE GOVEENMENT OF INDIA IN THE 
FOREIGN DEPAETMENT. 



YOL. IV. 



OONTAINDfa 



THE TREATIES, &c., RELATING TO THE STATES WITHIN THE 

BOMBAY PRESIDENCY. 



EEVISED AND CONTINUED UP TO THE PEESENT TIME 
BY 

LIEUTENANT A. C. TALBOT, B.S.C., 

ATTACHE IN THE FOEEIGN DEPAETMENT. 



RE-PRINTED AT THE FOREIGN OFFICE PRESS. 

1876. 



PREFACE TO THE FIRST EDITION. 



The Compiler of this Volume desires to record his obligations 
to the Secretary to the Bombay Government, to Lieutenant Colo- 
nel Keatinge, v.c, Political Agent in Kattywar, to Captain 
Barton, Political Agent in Eewa Kanta, and to Major Black, 
Political Agent in Mahee Kanta, for information supplied to him ; 
also to Pandit Lukshmeenath Bao, of the Poreign Office, who 
assisted in translating some of the engagements which form Part 
* In revised edition Srd III of the 4ith* Volumc, but whosc name 
^°'"'"®' was inadvertently omitted in the notice 

accompanying that Volume. 

The Compiler has also been much indebted to a collection 
of Treaties, &c., relating to the States in "Western India, compiled 
by Mr. R. Hughes Thomas, and to the valuable selections from 
the Records of the Bombay Government edited by the same 
gentleman. 



Calcutta, 
l^th Z>ecemberl8Q4i 



.1 



PREFACE TO REVISED EDITION. 



,.Thb thanks of the compiler of the preseut edition are due 
to Colonels Shortt and Watson for the statistical tables appended 
to the Pahlunpore and Rewa Kanta narratives respectively, and 
especially to J. B. Peile, Esq., C.S., Political Agent Kattiawar, 
and his Assistants for the trouble taken by them in correcting 
up to date the statistics given in Appendix No. I. 



CONTENTS. 



TREATIES, ENGAGEMENTS, and SUNNUDS relating to the STATES 
WITHIN THE BOMBAY PRESIDENCY. 



KTJTCH AGEIirCT. 



NAKRATIVE 



I. Treaty concluded by Jemadar Futh Mahomed on behalf of the Eao of 

Kutch for the suppression of piracy, dated 7th December 1809 ... H 
Engagement entered into by Dewan Hunsraj Samedass renouncing all 
claim to interference in the countries east of the Gulf of Kutch and 
the Runn, dated 28th October 1809 ..■. ... ... ih. 

Translation of a paper from Dewan Hunsraj Samedass for the 
sovereignty of Mandvee Bunder, dated 12th November 1809 ... 12 

II. Treaty entered into by the Eao of Kutch engaging to pay an indemnity 

for losses caused by the inroad of Wagurs, dated 14th January 1816 ... 13 
Deed executed by the Kao of Kutch for the cession of the district of 
Anjar to the Hon'ble Company, dated 16th January 1816 ... 16 

III. Supplementary Treaty concludediwith the Rao of Kutch on the remission 

of the annual subsidy ^id to the Hon'ble Company, dated 18th 
June 1816 ... ... ... ... ... 17 

IV. Treaty concluded with the Eao of Kutch guaranteeing to His Highness 

the integrity of his State, dated 13th October 1819 ... ... 18 

V. Deed executed, by the Wagur Chiefs engaging to preserve the peace 

within their estates, dated 15th April 1819 ... ... ... 22 

Deed of Pa'el Zamin passed by Mudvee Samla Ajanee of Ajapore for the 
Wagur Chiefe, dated 11th April 1819 ' ... ... ... 24 

Deed of Arr Zamin by the Jhareja Chiefs of Kuntakot for the Wagur 
Chiefs, dated 11th April 1819 ... ,. ... ... ib. 

VI. Treaty entered into by the Eao of Kuteh on the restoration of the dis- 
trict of Anjar, dated 2lBt May 1822 ... ... ... 25 

VII. Treaty concluded with the Eao of Kutch on the remission of arrears due 

to the British Government for military expenses, dated 23rd April 1833.. 27 

VIII. Treaty entered into by the Eao of Kutch on being invested with the 

management of his State, dated 5th July 1834 ... ... 28 

IX. Proclamation issued by the Eao of Kutch abolishing the importation of 

slaves into Kutch ... ... ... ... ... 29 

X. Eules exempting from payment of duties vessels driven by stress of 

weather into ports in Kuteh, dated 27th October 1851 ... ... 30 

XI. Agreement entered into by the Chiefs of Joonagurb, Kowanuggur, Bhow- 
nuggur, and Porebunder engaging to exempt from payment of 
customs duties Kutch vessels driven by stress of weather into their 
ports, dated 26th May 1873 ... ... ... ... 31 

XII. Engagement entered into by the Jhareja Chiefs of Kuteh renouncing 

female infanticide, dated 23rd March 1840 ... ... ... 32 

XIII. Agreement entered into by the Jhareja Chiefs engaging to suppress 

female infanticide, dated 7th May 1846 ... ... ... 34 

XIV. Engagement entered into by the Chief of the Hothi tribe of Jharejas 

for the suppression of female infanticide ... ... ... 35 

IV A 



U CONTENTS. 

KXJTCH AGENCY— CConfd.J 

XV. Agreement executed by the Eao of Kutcli for tie constitution of a 

Bhayad court, dated 4th January 1872 ... ... _ ... 36 

XVI. Proclamation by the Eao of Kutch warning his subjects generally against 

engaging in the slave-trade, dated 24th April 1869 ... ... 38 

XVII. Proclamation by the Eao of Kutch to his subjects residing at Zanzibar 
warning them against engaging in the slave-trade, dated 16th 
December 1872 ... ... ... ... ... 39 

A similar proclamation was issued to the Eao's subjects at Muscat ... ib. 
XVIII. Adoption Sunnud granted to the Eao of Kutch, dated 11th March 1862 ib. 

PAHLUNPOEE AGENCY. 

NAEEATIVE... ... ... ... ... ... ••• 41 

Pahlunpore ... ... ... ... •■• •■■ »&• 

XIX. Engageipent mediated between the Dewan of Pahlunpore and the 

Gaekwar for the payment of tribute, dated 19th November 1809 ... 47 

XX. Agreement entered into by Shumsher Khan on the adoption of Futh 

Khan as his heir, dated 23rd December 1813 ... ... ib. 

Agreement entered into by Dewan Futh Khan on his recognition as 
heir to Shumsher Khan, dated 23rd December 1813 ... ... 50 

Deed of adoption of Shumsher Khan, dated 25th December 1813 ... 51 

SXI. Engagement entered into by Dewan Futh Khan for the residence of the 

Gaekwar's Agent at Pahlunpore, dated 28th November 1817 ... 52 

XXII. Agreement of the Dewan of Pahlunpore engaging to prohibit the transit 

of opium through his territory, dated September 1822 ... ... 55 

Similar engagement entered into by Chiefs of the petty States under the 
Pahlunpore Agency ... ... ... ... ib. 

XXIII. Adoption Sunnud granted to the Dewan of Pahlunpore, dated 11th 

March 1862 ... ... ... ... ... ib. 

XXIV. Agreement concluded between the Dewan of Pahlunpore and the Eana 

of Danta for the suppression of the Koolee and Bheel outrages, dated 
27th July 1819 ... ... ... ... ... 56 

Eadhtjupoee ... ... ... ... * ... ... 43 

XXV. Engagement entered into by the Nawab of Eadhunpore empowering the 
Gaekwar to control the external relations of Eadhunpore, dated 16th 
December 1813 ... . ... ... ... ... 58 

XXVI. Agreement entered into by the Nawab of Eadhunpore for the payment 

of an annual tribute to the British Government, dated 6th July 1820. 59 

XXII. Agreement entered into by the Nawab of Eadhunpore engaging to pro- 

hibit the transit of opium through his territory ... ... 55 

XXIII. Adoption Sunnud granted to the Nawab of Eadhunpore, dated 11th 

March 1862 ... ... ... ... ... ib. 

Petty States ... ... ... ... ... ... 44 

XXVII. Agreement entered into by the Chiefs of Terwara and dependencies 

engaging to refrain from committing depredations in British terri- 
tory, dated 28th July 1820 ... ... .., ... 60 

Similar engagements were entered into by the Chiefs of Thurad, Warye, 
Deodur, Wao, Chorwar, Sooegam, Charchut, and Bhabur ... ib. 



CONTENTS. 



Ill 



Petty Stateu— (Cwic?.) 

XXVIII. Agreement of submission entered into by the Thakoor of Thurad, dated 

23rd August 1826 ... ... ... ... ... 61 

Similar engagements were entered into by the Chiefs of Wao, Warye, 
Deodur, Chorwar, Sooegam, Terwara, and Bhabur ... ... 62 

XXIX. Engagement entered into by the Chief of Chorwar for the suppression 

of infanticide, dated 3rd March 1827 ... ... ... ib. 

A similar engagement entered into by the Chief of Charchut, dated 9th 
June 1827 ... ... ... ... ... 63 

XXX. Agreement entered into by the Chief of Santulpore for the suppres- 
sion of female infanticide, dated 18th June 1853 ... ... ib. 

Similar engagements were entered into by the Chiefe of Charchut, 
Thurad, and Wao ... ... ... ... ... ib. 

XXII Agreement entered into by the Chief of Wao engaging to prohibit the 

transport of opium through his territory ... ... ... 55 

Similar engagements were executed by the Chiefs of Sooegam, Thurad, 
Morwara, Warye, Chorwar, Charchut, Terwara, Deodur, Bhabur, 
and Beinup ... ... ... ... ... jj. 



MAHEB KANTA. 



NARRATIVE 



XXXI. General security bond executed by the Chiefs of Mahee Kanta for the 
payment of the Gaekwar's dues, 1812 



65 



71 



Edtje ... ... ... ... .,, ... ... 66 

XXXII. Agreement concluded between the Chiefs of Edur and Ahmednuggur 
for the settlement of their claims to the Bayer pergunnah, dated 4th 
May 1843 ... ... ... ... ... 74 

XXXIII. Engagement entered into by Pirthee Sing on his installation to the 

Ahmednuggur Chiefship, dated 18th February 1836 ... ... 76 

XXXIV. Deed executed by the Edur Durbar engaging to prevent the smuggling 

of salt through their territory, dated 28th October 1861 ... 77 

Translation of a letter from Maharajah Jowansinghjee of Edur regard- 
ing compensation for the exclusion of Mar war salt from, the Edur 
market, dated 2ritd July 1862 ... ... ... ... 78 

Similar engagements executed by the Bana of Danta, and the 
Thakoors of Sameyra, Pol, Dhrole, and Deygamra ... ... 79 

XXXV, Agreement concluded with the Edur Durbar for the construction of a 

weir in the river Huthmutteey dated 20th July 1874 ... ... 85 

XVIII. Adoption Sunnud granted to the Chief of Edur, dated 11th March 1862 40 



Petty Chiefs 
XXXVI. 



XXXVII. 



Agreement executed by Thakoor Gooman Sing to the Gaekwar for the 
good conduct of the Thakoor of AmUarah, dated 8th October 1808 ... 87 

Perwannah of Anund Eao Gaekwar granted to the Bhattajee of 
Amliarah ... .., ... ... ... 89 

General Security Bond executed by the Lobar zemindars in favour of 
the Gaekwar, dated 10th November 1809 ... ... ... ib. 

Perwannah of the Gaekwar in favour of the Lobar zemindars, dated 8th 
November 1809 ... .,, ... ... ... 91 



IV 



CONTENTS. 



Petty Chiefs— {Co«<«?.) 

XXXVIII. Security bond executed by the Thakoor of Ahyma for the good con- 
duct of the Koolees of his pergunnah, dated 15th April 1811 ... 92 

Counter security executed by the Thakoor of Ahyma for the good con- 
duct of the inhabitants of Bajeepoora ... ... ... 93 

XXXIX. Agreement executed by the Chief of Titovee engaging to be responsible 

for all disorders in his pergunnah, dated 29th April 1821 ... ib. 

XL. Security bond executed by the Chief of Gajun for the good conduct of 

the inhabitants of his pergunnah, dated 6th May 1821 ... ... 95 

A similar engagement was executed by the Chief of Auti'ole ... 96 

XLI. Agreement entered into by the Chiefs of Anoria engaging to be respon- 
sible for the conduct of the inhabitants of the district, dated list 
June 1821 ... ... ... ... ... ib. 

XLII. Deed of security and counter security executed by the Koolee Chiefs for 

preserving peace in the villages in M^raj talooka ,., ... 98 



KATTIAWAR AGENCY. 



NAREATIYE ... 



... 101 



XLin. Engagement entered into by the Chief of Limree for the preservation of 
the general peace of the country ... ... ... 

Perpetual revenue engagement executed by the Chief of Limree in 
favour of the Gaekwar 



XLIV. 



XLV. 



XLVI. 



XL VII. 



XLVIII. 



XLIX. 



Decennial security bond executed by the Chief of Limree for the pay- 
ment of his revenue 

Agreement entered into by the Chief of Limree touching the settlement 
of his talooka 

Eules for the settlement of the claims of subordinate Bhayad and 
Moolgirassias of Kattiawar 

Supplementary rules, dated 26th August 1873 



Engagement entered into by the Jhareja Chiefs for the suppression of 
female infanticide 

Renewed engagement entered into by the Jam of Nowanuggur for the 
suppression of female infanticide, dated 25th February 1812 

Engagement of the Chief of Rajkot for the suppression of female 
infanticide, dated 18th August 1835 

Engagement executed by the Chief of Wankaneer for the suppression 
of female infanticide, dated 6th October 1835 

Similar engagement entered into by the Chief of Kotra Sangana 

Engagement entered into by the Jam of Nowanuggur for preventing 
the smuggling of opium, dated 11th January 1821 

Similar engagements were executed by the Rana of Porebunder and 
the Chiefs of Drangdra, Than Lukhtur, Dussara, Bujana, Jhinjoowara, 
Wunode, Veerpore, Khureree, Jaitpore, Cheetul, Jusdhun, Khumbhala, 
Soodamra, Bhulgam, Batwa ... ... .,, ... 134 

Notification for the prevention of smuggling of opium in Kattiawar, 
dated 4th July 1820 ... ... ... ... ib. 

' Letter from the Chief of Wadwan engaging to promulgate the above 
Notification in his district, dated 4th July 1820 ... ... 135 

Similar letters from the Chiefs of Limree, Gondul, Wankaneer, Choora, 
Wui'ode, Jusdhun, and the Girassia Chiefs of Kattiawar,,. ... 137 



121 
122 
123 
124 

125 

129 

ib. 

131 

132 

ib. 
133 

ib. 



CONTENTS. Y 

Okhamtjndui, ... ... ... ... ... ... Ill 

L. Engagement entered into by tlie ©hiefs of Aramra and Bey t renouncing 

piracy and all right to wrecks, dated 14tli December 1807 . . . 139 

Security bond of the Dewan Hunsraj of Kutch for the Chiefs of Beyt 
and Dwarka ... .,. ... ... ... 140 

Similar engagements were executed by the Chiefs of Dwarka, Dhingey 
and Positra ... ... ... ... ... ib. 

Security bond of the Chief of Beyt for the Chief of Positra ... 141 

JoONAGrEH ... ... ... ... ... ... 112 

LI. Agreement of the Nawab of Joonagurh for the collection of his 

revenues in Kattiawar, dated 1st February 1821 ... ... 141 

LII. Engagement executed by the Nawab of Joonagurh renouncing piracy 

and all rights to wrecks ... ... ... ... 142 

LIII. Engagement entered into by the Nawab of Joonagurh in perpetuity 
ceding his Moolkgeeree collections in Kattiawar to the Hon'ble Com- 
pany, dated 5th May 1817 ... ... ... ...143 

Sunnud of the Nawab of Joonagurh ceding certain revenues to the 
Hon'ble Company, dated 13th April 1817 ... ... ... 145 

LIV. Engagement' entered into by the Nawab of Joonagurh for the suppres- 
sion of suttee within his jurisdiction, dated 3rd January 1838 ... ib. 

LV. Agreement entered into by the Nawab of Joonagurh engaging to 
exempt from payment of duty vessels driven by stress of weather 
into the ports of Joonagurh, dated 19th March 1846 ... ... 146 

LVI. Agreement entered into by the Joonagurh Durbar for the construc- 
tion of a telegraph line, dated 20th July 1874 ... ... ib. 

LXIV. Engagement entered into by the Nawab of Joonagurh agreeing to 
exempt from payment of customs duty vessels driven by stress of 
weather into the ports of Joonagurh, dated 20th December 1849 ... 157 

XI. Engagement entered into by the Nawab of Joonagurh for exempting 
from payment of duty Kutch vessels entering his ports from stress 
ofweather, dated 26th May 1873 ... ... ... 3i 

XXIII. Adoption Sunnud granted to the Nawab of Joonagurh, dated 11th 

March 1862 ... ... ... ... ... 55 

NoWANUGaUE ... ... ... ... ... ... 113 

LVII. Engagement entered into by the Jam of Nowanuggur renouncing 

piracy and all right to future wrecks, dated 27th January 1808 ... 147 

A similar engagement was taken from Ehawas Suggaram and Pragjee 
of Joriabundur ... ... ... - ... ... 148 

LVIII. Articles of submission executed by the Jam of Nowanuggur, dated 

23rd February 1812... ... ... ... ... ib. 

Security bond for the conduct of the Jam of Nowanuggur, dated 29th 
February 1812 ... ... ... ... ... 150 

Perwannah of the Gaekwar raising the t/ibute payable by the Jam of 
Nowanuggur, dated 26th February 1812 ... ... ... 151 

Sunnud of the Gaekwar on the annexation of the port of Suryah belong- 
ing to the Jam of Nowanuggur, dated 26th February 1812 ... ib. 
LIX. Engagement entered into by the Jam of Nowanuggur exempting from 
payment of duty vessels driven by stress of weather into his ports, 
dated 23nd March 1846 ... ... ... ... 152 



VI CONTENTS. 



NoWANUGGtTE— (Contd.) 



LXIV. Engagement executed by "the Jam of Nowanuggur exempting vessels 
from payment of duty when driven by stress of weather into his ports, 
dated 20th December 1849 ... ... ... ... 157 

XI. Engagement of the Jam of Nowanuggur exempting from payment of 
duty Kutch vessels entering his ports from stress -of weather, dated 
28th Jime 1873 ... ... ... ... ... 32 

XVIII. Adoption Sunnud granted to the Jam of Nowanugg^r, dated 11th 

March 1840 ... ... ... ... ... 40 



Bhownuggue ... ... ... ... ... ... 114 

LX. Agreement entered into by the Thakoor of Bhownuggur for the fort of 

Tarraga, dated 31st January 1773 ... ... ...153 

LXI. Agreement with the Thakoor of Bho-yrauggur for the transfer of the 
Gaek war's share of the revenue of Bhownuggur to the British 
Government, dated 8th November 1808 ... ... ... 154 

Perwannah granted to the Thakoor of Bhownuggur for the payment of 
his revenues, dated 8th November 1808 ,.. ... ... ib. 

LXII. Engagement of the Thakoor of Bhownuggur relinquishing his share to 

the land and sea customs of Gogo, dated 8th September 1840 ,,. 155 

LXIII. Agreement of the Thakoor of Bhownuggur engaging to exempt from 
payment of duty vessels entering his ports from stress of weather, 
dated 18th January 1846 ... ... ... ... 156 

LXIV. Letter from the Thakoor of Bhownuggur engaging not to levy customs 
duty on vessels entering his ports from stress of weather, dated 
20th December 1849 ... ... ... ...157 

LXV. Agreement with the Thakoor of Bhownuggur for the revenues of his 

estate, dated 22nd December 1860 ... ... ... ib 

LXVI. Agreement with the Bhownuggur Durbar for the construction and 
maintenance of the telegraph line from Dhollerah to Bhownuggur, 
dated 23rd January 1874 ... ... ... ... 160 

XI. Engagement of the Bhownuggur Durbar for exempting from customs 
duty Kutch vessels entering his port from stress of weather, dated 
13th May 1873 ... ... ... ... ... 32 

XVIII. Adoption Sunnud granted to the Thakoor of Bhownuggur, dated 11th 

March 1862 ..'. ... ... ... ... 40 



PoEEBtTNDEE ... ... ... ... ... ... 117 

LXVII. Engagement executed by the Chief of Porebunder renouncing piracy 

and all right to wrecks ... ,,, ... ... 161 

LXVIII. Agreement concluded with the Rana of Porebunder for the cession of half 
of the port of Porebunder to the Hon'bie Company, dated 5th Decem- 
ber 1809... ... ... ... ... ... 162 

LXIV. Agreement entered into by the Rana of Porebunder exempting from 
payment of duty vessels entering his port from stress of weather, dated 
30th December 1849 ... ... ... ... 157 

XL Agreement entered into by the Rana of Porebunder exempting from 
payment of duty Kutch vessels entering his port, dated 21st May 
1873 ... ,.. ... ../ ... „■; 32 



CONTENTS. 



vn 



Jaffeeabad 



118 



LXIX. Treaty of commerce concluded with the Seedee of Jafferabaid, dated 3rd 

January 1761 ... ... ... ... ... 163 

Agreement entered into by the Seedee of Jafferabad for the suppression 
of suttee within his jurisdiction... ... ... ... 145 

Agreement entered into by the Seedee of Jafferabad exempting from 
payment of duty Kutch vessels driven into his ports from stress of 
weather, dated 30th December 1849 ... ... ... 157 



LIV. 



LXIV. 



Eajkot 



118 



LXX. Agreement concluded with the Kajkot Durbar for the cession of land 

for a civU station, dated 25th September 1863 ... ... 165 



GONDUL 



119 



LXXI. Agreement concluded with the Gondul Durbar for the construction and 

maintenance of a telegraph line, dated 11th July 1874 ... ... 168 



Wadwan 
LXXII. 



LXXIII. 



119 



Agreement concluded with the Thakoor of Wadwan for the cession of 
land for a civil station, dated 7th January 1864 ... ... 169 

Engagement entered into by the Bhoomeas of Doodrej accepting a pecu- 
niary compensation for a piece of land taken up for a civil station, 
dated 7th January 1864 ... ... ... ... 171 

Mallia ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 120 

LXXIV. Agreement entered into by the Thakoor of Mallia engaging to be res- 
ponsible for Meenas placed under his control, dated 21st December 
1863 ... ... ... ... ... 172 

BARODA AGENCY. 

(jaekwae ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 175 

LXXV. Treaty concluded with Putteh Sing Gaekwar for the Gaekwar's share of 

the revenues of Broach, dated 12th January 1773 ... ... 189 

LXXVl. Treaty mediated between Futteh Sing Gaekwar and the Peishwa Eagoba. ib. 

LXXVII. Treaty of offensive and defensive alliance concluded with Futteh Sing 

Gaekwar, dated 26th January 1780 ... ... ...190 

LXXVIII. Convention concluded with Anund Rao Gaekwar for the maintenance of 

a British subsidiary force, dated 15th March 1802 ... ... 197 

LXXIX. Treaty concluded with Anund Rao Gaekwar for the maintenance of a 

British subsidiary force, dated 6th June 1802 ... ... 198 

Sannud of Anund Rao Gaekwar ceding pergunnah Chickly to the 
British Government, dated 4th June 1802 ... ... 201 

Anund Rao's confirmation of the Treaty of 6th June 1802 ... ib. 

Engagement entered into by Himut Bahadoor accepting a provision 
from Anund Rao Gaekwar, dated 2nd June 1802 ... ... 204 

Sunnud to Mulhar Rao Gaekwar guaranteeing the protection of the 
British Government, dated 6th June 1802 ... ...205 

Engagement executed by Mulhar Rao Gaekwar renouncing all claims 
on the Gaekwar, dated 3rd June 1802 ... ... ...206 

Letter from Anund Rao Gaekwar to Mulhar Rao Gaekwar, guaranteeing 
a maintenance to him, dated 8th June 1802 ... ,,. ib. 



viii CONTENTS. 

Gaek wiE— ( Contd.) 

' Sunnud from Anund Rao Gaekwar to the Soobahdar of Surut Atta- 
veessee for the transfer of Chickly to the Hon'ble Company, dated 
4th June 1802 ... ... ... ... ••• 307 

Sunnud from Anund Rao Gaekwar to Vittul Rao Babajee Comavishdar 
for the transfer of Chickly to the Hon'ble Company, dated 4th June 
1802 ... ... ... ... - »■*■ 

Sunnud from Anund Rao Gaekwar to the zemindars on the transfer of 
Chickly to the British Government, dated 4th June 1802 ... 208 

Sunnud from Anund Rao Gaekwar to Myral Narayen for the transfer 
of pergunnah Nudyad to the Hon'ble Company, dated 6th June 1802 ib. 

Sunnud from Anund Rao GaSkwar for the cession of pergunnah Dholka 
to the Hon'ble Company, dated 6th June 1802 ... ... ib 

Bond executed by Anund Rao Gaekwar assigning lands for the pay- 
ment of the British force, dated 6th June 1802 ... ...209 

Sunnud from Anund Rao Gaekwar assigning the revenues of Mulhar 
Rao Gaekwar's pergunnah Neryad towards the payment of the 
British subsidiary force, dated 6th June 1802 ... ... ib. 

Sunnud from Anund Rao Gaekwar to the zemindars of Neryad for the 
delivery of the pergunnah of the Hon'ble Company, dated 6th June 
1802 ... ... ... ... ... ... 210 

Sunnud granted to Raojee Appajee guaranteeing the Dewanship to 
his family, dated 8th June 1802... ... ... ... ib. 

Sunnud to Raojee Appajee for the village of Bhatta, dated 6th June 
1802 ... ... ... ... ... ... ib. 

Acceptance by Girassias of the proposals made by Mr. Miguel de Lima 
e'Souza on behalf of the Gaekwar to the Hon'ble Company, dated 
27th J'ebruary 1802... ... ... ... ...211 

Perwannah from Anund Rao Gaekwar to the Girassias of Dhoondooka 
on the transfer of certain lands to the Hon'ble Company, dated 2nd 
June 1802 ... ... ... ... ... 213 

LXXX. Supplementary agreement Mth Anund Rao Gaekwar for the cession 
of certain jaghires for the maintenance of a British subsidiary 
force ... ... ... ... ... ib. 

Statement of districts ceded to the Hon'ble Company, dated 18th Febru- 
ary 1803 ... ... ... ... ... 214 

Sunnud from Anund Rao Gaekwar for the transfer of pergunnah 
Neryad to the Hon'ble Company, dated 25th January 1802 ... 215 

Sunnud from Anund Rao Gaekwar for the transfer of the fort and 
village of Kaira to the Hon'ble Company, dated 3rd May 1803 ... ib. 

Sunnud from Anund Rao Gaekwar for the transfer of pergunnahs 
Mattur and Motha and the customs of Kimkatodra to the Hon'ble 
Company ... ... ... ... ... 216 

Sunnud from Anund Rao Gaekwar for the transfer of the customs of 
Kimkatodra to the Hon'ble Company, dated 2nd June 1803 . . . ib. 

Sunnud from Anund Rao Gaekwar to the zemindars of Kimkatodra 
directing the payment of customs to the Hon'ble Company, dated 2nd 
June 1803 ... ... ... ... ... 217 

LXXXI. Definitive Treaty of general defensive alliance concluded with Anund 

Eao Gaekwar, dated 21st April 1805 ... ... ... ib. 

Schedule of districts ceded in perpetual sovereignty by Anund Rao 
Gaekwar to the Hon'ble Company for the payment of the subsidiary 
force, dated 21st April 1805 ... ... .,. .,, 222 



CONTENTS. 



Gaekwae — {Contd.) 



Letter from Khundee Eao Gaekwar expressive of his acknowledg- 
ments for the above remission, dated 17th June 1858 ... ...246 



Khureeta to Khundee Eao Gaekwar in acknowledgment of the services 

rendered during the mutiny 
XCIII. Agreement entered into by the Gaekwar engaging to cede lands in 

fuU sovereignty for railway purposes, dated 14th May 1856 
XCIV. Adoption Sunnud granted to the Gaekwar, dated 11th March 

1862 ... 
Proclamation suspending the sovereign powers exetoised by Mulhar Eao 

Gaekwar, dated 13th January 1875 
Proclamation deposing Mulhar Eao from the sovereignty of the Baroda 

State, dated 19th April 1875 ... ... .■• 



xcv. 



XCVI. 



247 



ih. 



248 



ib. 



249 



EEWA KANTA. 



NAEEATITR 
XCVII. 



251 



263 



264 



ib. 



Note addressed to the Chiefs of the Eewa Kanta Agency for the pre- 
vention of suttee, dated 3rd April 1840 
Letter from the Maharawul of Oodeypore engaging to prohibit suttee 

in his territory 
Letter from the Maharawul of Deogurh Barrea engaging to prohibit 
. the practice of suttee in his territory ... ' . . . 

Letter from the Thakoor of Loonawara intimating the issue of a 

proclamation abolishing suttee in his territory 
Letter from the Thakoor of Soanth engaging to abolish the rite of 

suttee, dated 12th May 1840 ... ... ... ... ib. 

Letter from the Thakoor of Bhadurwah engaging to prohibit suttee in 

his territory ... ... ... ... ... 265 

Letter from the Thakoor of Wankaneer engaging to prohibit suttee in 

his district ... ... ... ... ... ib. 

Letter from the Maharana of Eajpeepla engaging to prohibit suttee in 

his district ... ... ... ... ... ib. 



Eajpeepla ... ... ... ... ... ... 251 

XCVIII. Sunnud from Anund Eao Gaekwar conferring on Koer Pertab Sing the 

administration of Eajpeepla, dated 27th February 1816 ... ... 265 

XCIX. Agreement entered into by Maharana Verisal on his accession to the 

Eaj of Eajpeepla, dated 11th October 1821 ... ... ...266 

C. Bond executed by the Eajah of Eajpeepla for the payment of the Gaekwar's 

tribute to the British Government, dated 20th February 1823 ... 267 

Engagement pf Verisal for the payment of an annual sum for the 
maintenance of Sooruj Koer and Pertab Sing, dated 21st February 
1823 ... ... ... ... ... ... ib. 

CI. Engagement executed by Verisal defining his relations with the British 

Government, dated 26th November 1823 ... ... ...268 

CII. Engagement mediated between the Eajah of Eajpeepla and the Gaekwar 
Government regarding the exchange of certain villages, dated 28th 
November 1852 ... ... ... ... ...270 

XVIIL Adoption Sunnud granted to the Eajah of Eajpeepla, dated 11th March 

1862 ... ... ..; ... ... ... 40 



CONTENTS. Xi 

Deogtjeh Baerea ... ... ... ... ,,, ... 253 

QUI. Engagement entered into by the Bajah of Barrea ffir the payment of a 

tribute to the British Government, dated March 1824 ... ... 273 

CIV. Engagement entered into by Rajah Pirthee Eaj for the payment of an 
enhanced tribute for the maintenance of a local force, dated 24th 
January 1824 ... ... ... ... ,.. 274 

Chota Oodetpoee ... ... ... ... ... ... 255 

CV. Agreement entered into by the Rajah of Chota Oodeypore acknow- 
ledging the protection of the British Government, dated 21st Novem- 
ber 1822 ... .., ... ... ... 275 

Letter addressed by the Rajah of Chota Oodeypore engaging to pay his 
tribute to the British Government, dated 28th. June 1822 ... 276 

Perwannah from the Gaekwar to the Rajah of Chota Oodeypore guaran^ 
teeing his possessions, dated 31&t October 1822 ... ...' i6. 

Letter to the address of Rajah of Chota Oodeypore, guaranteeing the 
protection of the British Government, dated 11th December 1822 ... ib. 

LOONAWABA ... ... ... .., ... ,.. 256 

CVI. Sunnud granted to the Chief of Loonawara, guaranteeing the protection 

of the British Government, dated 27th September 1803 ... 277 

CVII. Treaty entered into by the Chief of Loonawara on his becoming a tribu- 
tary of the British Government, dated 14th November 1803 ... ib. 

CVIII. Treaty entered into by the Chief of Loonawara for the settlement of the 

Gaekwar's tributary claims ... ... ... ... 278 

Bond executed by Jussoo Phooljee Bhaut for the payment of the 
ghasdana dues to the Gaekwar Government ... ... 279 

CIX. Agreement concluded with Man Sing Patunkur for the payment of 

Scindia's tribute by the Chief of Loonawara, dated 10th August 1819 ib. 

SOANTH ... ... ... ... ... ... 257 

ex. Treaty concluded with the Chief of Soanth, dated 15th December 1803. . . 280 

CIX. Engagement entered into by the Chief of Soanth with Man Sing Patun- 
kur for the payment of Scindia's tribute, dated 10th August 1819 . . . 279 

Balasinobe ... ... ... ... ... ... 258 

XXXI. Engagement entered into by the Nawab of Balasinore for the payment 

of the Gaekwar's dues ... ... ... ... 71 

CXI. Engagement concluded with the Babee of Balasinore for introduction of 
the British opium required within his territory, dated 30th August 
1820 ..: ... ..; ... ... ... 282 

Petty Chiefs ... ... ... ... ... ... 260 

CXII. Bond entered into by Coveereea Wussawa of Pergunnah Sukhbarra for the 

good conduct of the ryots of his pergunnah, dated 31st January 1822 282 

Declaration made by the persons who have become counter security for 
the above ... ... ... ... ... 284 

Engagement entered into by Coveereea Wussawa renouncing all daim to 
Ghoonwallee Koontee for a pecuniary compensation, dated 8th April 
1825 .,, ... ... ... ,.. ... il. 



xu 



CONTENTS. 



Petty Chiefs — (Contd.) 

CXIII. Bond exicuted by the Mewassees of Tilluckwarra for the good conduct 

of their relations and dependants, dated 18th March 1825 ... 285 

CXIV. Memorandum from the Gaekwir Government containing arrangement 

for the settlement of the Mewassees of Kewa Kanta ... ...287 

CXV. Bond executed by the Mewassee zemindars of Powagurh for the good 

conduct of their relations and dependants, dated 15th February 1826 292 

Counter security bonds for the above ... ... ... 296 

CAMBAY. 

NARRATIVE ... ... ... ... ... ... 297 

CXVI. Treaty concluded with the Nawab of Cambay for the transfer of the fort 

of Tarrajah to the Nawab, dated 23rd April 1771 ... ... 301 

CXVII. Agreement entered into by the Nawab of Cambay engaging not to 

molest the Thakoor of Bhownuggur, dated 22nd October 1771 .. 302 

CXVIII. Engagement entered into by the Nawab of Cambay for the farm of the 

Peishwa's share of the chouth and napaar to the Hon'ble Company 303 

Agreement entered into by the Nawab of Cambay for the levy of transit 
duties on goods imported and exported by sea through the port of 
Cambay ... ... ... ... ... 304 

Memorandum of rates of transit duty to be levied on articles to be im- 
ported from Cambay in lieu of sea, laud customs, and other duties . . . 306 

Memorandum of arrangements with the Nawab of Cambay regarding 
customs duties to be levied on goods imported into the city of Cambay 
and on goods, the produce thereof when exported by sea. . . ... 307 

Statement showing the rate of sea customs duties on goods imported 
into and exported from the town of Cambay, and anchorage fees to be 
levied on vessels arriving at Cambay ' ... ... ... 309 

Statement of the distribution of the huk allowances from the customs 
and anchorage fees levied at the port of Cambay ... ... 310 

Amended Art. XI. of the Agreement with the Nawab of Cambay for the 
disposal of rahdaree collections .. . ,., ... ... ih. 



SXJBAT AGENCY. 



NARRATIVE 

SUCHBEN . 



311 
ih. 



CXX. Agreement concluded between the Nawab of Sucheen and the Peishwa on 

the resignation of his claims on Jinjeera, 1790-91 ... ,,, 315 

Engagement entered into by Seedee Abdool Kurreem Khan agreeing to 
abide by the above agreement ... ... ... ... ib. 

CXXI. Agreement entered into by the Nawab of Sucheen on the assumption of 
the management of his country by the British Government till the 
liquidation of his debts ... ... , , , ... 316 

XXIII. Adoption Sunnud granted to the Nawab of Sucheen, dated 11th 

March 1862 ... .,. ... .., ... 55 



CONTENTS. 



XUl 



Bansda 



311 



CXXII. Agreement entered into by the Rajah of Bansda for the farm of the 

Government chouth zukat, dated 16th March 1858 ... ... 316 



XVIII. Adoption Sunnud granted to the Rajah of Bansda 



40 



Dhuempore 



312 



CXXIII. Agreement entered into by the Rajah of Dhurmpore for the farm of the 

British ohouth zukat, dated 6th April 1870 ... ... ...318 

XVin. Adoption Sunnud granted to the Rajah of Dhurmpore, dated 11th 

March 1862 ... ... ... ... ... 40 



JOWAR. 



NARRATIVE ... 



... 321 



CXXIV. Memorandum of settlement made for the administration of the Jowar 

Sumusthan, dated 16th December 1822 .'.. ... ...323 



JINJEERA. 

NARRATIVE ... ... ... ... ... 325 

CXXV. Treaty of offensive and defensive alliance concluded with Seedee Kasim 

Yakoot Khan of Jinjeera, dated 6th December 1733 ... ... 329 

Secret article concluded with the Seedee of Jinjeera for the expenses of 
the fleet, dated 7th December 1733 ... ... ...332 

CXXVI. Agreement mediated between Seedee Yakoot Khan and Abdool Raheem 

Khan for the adjustment of their dispute, dated 6th June 1772 ... ib, 

CXXVII. Agreement entered into by Balloo Meah ceding his claims on Jinjeera 

to the Peishwa for lands near Surat, dated 6th June 1791 . . . 334 

CXXVIII. Agreement entered into by Nawab Ibrahim Khan accepting the condi- 
tions on his reinstatement to the Chiefship of Jinjeera ... ... 335 



THE SATARA JAGHIREDARS. 



NARRATIVE .. 
CXXIX. 



337 



Adoption Sunnud granted to the Rajah of Akulkote to the Punth 
Piithee Nidhee, Punt Sucheo, the Nimbalkur and the Duflay, dated 
nth March 1862 ... ... ... ... ... 341 



Akulkote 



337 



CXXX. Engagement entered into by the Rajah of Akulkote on the restoration 

of his jaghire, dated 3rd July 1820 ... ... ...341 

Agreement concluded between the Rajah of Satara and Futteh Sing for 
the jaghire of Akulkote, dated 11th July 1820 ... ... 345 



Punt Sucheo 
CXXXI 



338 



Agreement entered into by the Punt Sucheo on the restoration of his 
jaghire, dated 22nd April 1820 ... ... ... ... 348 

Agreement concluded between the Rajah of Satara and Chimnajee 
Pundit Sudieo on the restoration of his jaghire, dated July 1820 , . , 360 



CONTENTS. 



Punt Svch-eo— {Co ntd.) 

CXXXII. Engagement con eluded with the Punt Sucheo for an exchange of territory, 

dated 12th April 1830 ... ... ... ... 353 

Statement containing particulars of the territory exchanged ... 355 

Statement of the revenues mutually exchanged with the Punt Sucheo . . . 357 
CXXXIII. Agreement entered into by the Punt Sucheo for the administration of 

his jaghire, dated 3rd February 1839 ... ... ... 358 

Punt Peithbe NiDHEB ... ... ... ••■ ••• 338 

CXXXIV. Engagement entered into by the Punt Prithee Nidhee on the restora- 
tion of his jaghire, dated 22nd April 1820 ... ... ... 360 

Agreement concluded between the Eajah of Satara with Rajesree 
Purushram Pundit on the restoration of his jaghire, dated July 1820 362 



DUFIAY 

cxxxv. 



• ■• 339 

Agreement entered into by Eenooka Bai on the restoration of the 
jaghire of Duflay, dated 22nd April 1820 ... ... ... 364 

Agreement concluded between the Eajah of Satara and Eenooka Bai on 
the restoration of the pergunnahs of Jut and Kurzgee, dated July 1820 368 



NiMBALKUE 

CXXXVI 



Engagement entered into by Jan Rao on the restoration of the jaghire 
of Phultun, dated 22ud April 1820 

Agreement concluded between the Rajah of Satara and the Nimbalkur 
on the restoration of the jaghire of Phultun, dated July 1820 



Wabkue 
CXXXVII. 



Engagement entered into by Shaik Meera Waekur on the restoration 
of his JE^hire, dated 3rd July 1820 

Yad from the Rajah of Satara to Shaik Meera Waekur on the restora- 
tion of his jaghire, dated 3rd July 1820 



339 
371 

374 
340 

377 
381 



KOLHAPOEE AGENCY. 

NARRATIVE ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 385 

KOLHAJOBK ... ... ... ... ... ... ib. 

CXXXVIII. Treaty of commerce concluded with the Maharajah of Kolhapore, dated 

12th January 1766 ... ... ... ... ...397 

CXXXIX. Agreement entered into by the Rajah of Kolhapore engaging to pay com- 
pensation for losses sustained by merchants at Malwan and the establish- 
ment of factories at Malwan and Kolhapore, dated 25th November 1792 399 



CXL. 



CXLI. 



Agreement entered into by the Rajah of Kolhapore ceding the port of 
Malwan and engaging to renounce piracy, dated 1st October 1812 ... 401 



Treaty entered into by the Rajah of Kolhapore engaging to reduce his 
army to peace establishment, dated 24th January 1826 ... ... 403 

GXLII. Agreement entered into by the Rajah of Kolhapore, limiting the strength 

of his army, dated 23rd October 1827 ... ... ... 406 

CXLIII. Treaty with the Maharajah of Kolhapore for the cession of certain districts 

to the Honourable Company, dated 15th March 1829 ... ... 408 

CXLIV. Treaty entered into by the Rajah of Kolhapore on the restoration of the 

administration to him, dated 20th October 1862 ... ... 411 

XVIII. Adoption Sunnud granted to the Rajah of Kolhapore, dated 11th March 

1862 ,., ... ... ... ... ... 40 



CONTENTS. 



XV 



Southern Maheatta JAaniEBDAEs ... ,., .,; ... 389 

CXLV. Agreement of Punderpore mediated between the S. M. Jaghiredars and 

the Peishwa, July and August 1812 ... ... ... 413 

CXLVI. Memorandum of terms granted to Chintamun Rao Putwurdhun for the 

lands held by him from the Peishwa, dated 15th May 1819 ... 415 

Articles of stipulation on the transfer of lands to Chintamun Rao, dated 
12th December 1820... ... ... ... ...416 

Agreement entered into by Chintamun Rao on the restoration of his 
jaghire ... ... ... ... ... 417 

Abstract Statement of the revenues of the districts finally ceded by 
Chintamun Rao to the British Government .. . ... ... 418 

CXLVII. Terms granted to Gunput Rao Bappoo Putwurdhun for the lands held by 

him from the Peishwa's Government, dated 17th June 1819. ... 419 

CXLVIII. Terms granted to Kessow Rao Baba Putwurdhun for the lands held by 

him from the Peishwa's Government ... ... ... 422 

Similar engagements were entered into by Gopal Rao Meerujkur and 

Gopal Rao of Jumkhundeekur and Gunput Rao Shedbalkur 425 

CXLIX. Letter from Trimbuck Rao Gunput of Shedbal agreeing to a cash pay- 
ment ia commutation of military service, dated 15th March 1848 ... 426 
Similar letters from the Chiefs of Jamkhundi, Meeruj, Mudhol, and 
Kurundwad ... ..." ... ... ... ib. 

CL. Adoption Sunnud granted to the Chiefs of Sanglee, Meeruj, Jamkhundi, 

and Kurundwad, dated 11th March 1862 ... ... ... 429 

CLI. Agreement entered into by the Chief of Ramdurg on the restoration of 

his jaghire, dated 9th June 1831 ... .,. ... 430 

Similar engagement entered into by the Chief of Nargundkur ... 431 

CL. Adoption Sunnud granted to the Chief of Ramdurg, dated 11th March 

1862 ... ... ... ... ... ... 430 

CLII. Terms granted to Venout Rao Rajah Gorepuray for the lands held by him 

from the Peishwa's Government, dated 27th December 1819 . . . 432 

CL. Adoption Sunnud granted to the Chief of Mudhol, dated' 11th March 

1862 ... ... ... ... ... ... 430 



SAWUNT WAREE, 



NARRATIVE 
CLIII. 



435 



Treaty of offensive and defensive alliance concluded with Phond Sawunt 
against Canojee Angria of Celaba, dated 12th January 1780 

CLIV. Treaty entered into by Khem Sawunt on the restoration of the foi-t of 
Raree, dated 7th April 1765 ... ... ... 

CLV. Treaty with Khem Sawunt for the cession of the fort of Vingorla, dated 
24th October 1766 ... 

CLVI. Treaty negotiated with Phond Sawunt for the suppression of piracy, 
dated 3rd October 1812 

CLVII. Treaty entered into by Khem Sawunt for submission to the British 
Government, dated 17th February 1819 

CLVIII. Treaty entered into by the Regency of Sawunt Waree on the restoration 
of certain districts ceded to the Hon'ble Company, dated 7th Febru- 
ary 1820 

CLIX. Engagement mediated between the Sawunt Waree and KolhaporeDurbars 
for the payment of revenue from the district of Maungaum to the 
fort of Nangnay, dated 16th March 1820 ... 



439 



440 



443 



450 



451 



XVI 



CONTENTS. 



SAWUNT WABEE- fContd.) 
CLX. Engagement mediated between the Sawunt Waree and Kolhapore Dur- 
bars for the payment of revenues from the district of Munohur to the 
fort of Munohurgurh, dated 6th March 1820 

CLXI. Engagement mediated between the Sawunt Waree and Kolhapore Dur- 
bars for the exchange of certain villages, dated 24th March 1820 ... 

CLXII. Treaty concluded with Khem Sawunt regarding the appointment of a 

Minister to the Sawunt Waree State, dated 25th December 1832 ... 

CLXIII. Treaty concluded with the Chief of Sawunt Waree for the transfer of 

the right to levy land and sea customs in Sawunt Waree to the 

British Governmeiit, dated 16th September 1838 

CLXIV. Letter from the Chief of Sawunt Waree entrusting the management of 

his territory to the British Government, dated 15th September 1838... 457 

XVIII. Adoption Sunnud granted to the Chief of Sawunt Waree, dated 11th 

March 1862 ... ... ... •■• ••• ^ 



452 



454 



455 



456 



SAVAWOOR. 

NARRATIVE ... ... ... ... ••■ ••• ••• 459 

CLXV. Adoption Sunnud granted to the Nawab of Savanoor, dated 19th 



March 1866 



461 



NARRATIVE 
Bboach 
CLXVI. 



Mandvee 
CLXVII. 

CLXVIII. 

CLXIX. 



StJEAT 

CLXX. 
CLXXI. 



LAPSED STATES, 

••• 463 

... ii- 

Treaty of peace and friendship concluded with the Nawab of Broach, 
dated 30th November 1771 ... ... ... ...475 



Separate Article concluded with the Nawab of Broach guaranteeing the 
protection of the Hon'ble Company to the Nawab 

Bond of the Nawab of Broach for the payment of the amount due to 
the Hon'ble Company 



477 



ih. 

... 463 

Treaty entered into by the Rajah of Mandvee engaging to defray the 
military expenses of the expedition sent to his aid, dated 18th Janu- 
ary 1810 ... ... ... ... ... 478 

Treaty entered into by the Rajah of Mandvee engaging to pay an annual 
tribute to the Honourable Company, for its protection, dated 11th 
March 1810 ... ... ... ... ... ih. 

Agreement entered into by the Rajah of Mandvee engaging to dismiss 
his evil advisers, and to make no change in the administration of the 
country without the knowledge and consent of the Honourable Com- 
• pany, dated 21st May 1818 ... ... ... ,..479 

.., 465 

Treaty concluded with the Governor of Surat for the establishment of 
commercial relations on the western coast of India, dated 20th 
October 1612 ... ... ... ... ... 480 

Letter from His Majesty King James to Selim Shah, the Great Mogul, 
intimating the deputation of Sir Thomas Roe, Kt., as Ambassador to 
his Court, dated 1614 ... ... ... ...482 

Letter from the Grand Mogul to His Majesty, King James, granting 
commercial privileges to the English merchants in the Mogul Empire 483 



CONTENTS. 



xvu 



CLXXIII. 



SvnA.T—{Conid.) 

CLXXII. Firman granted by Shall Aurungzeb to the Honourable Ea^t India 

company lor certain commercial privileges, dated 25th June 1667 ... 484 
Treaty conolnded with Masood Khan and Sufdar Khan of Surat for 
compensating the English for losses, and permitting them to trade 
according to their firman, dated 17th March 1752 .... ... 485 

Memorandum regarding the ratification of the above Treaty ... 486 

Bond executed by Seedee Masood Khan for the payment of two lakhs of 
rupees to the English, dated 17th March 1752 ... ... 487 

Bond executed by merchants and subjects for the payment of two lakhs 
of rupees to the English, dated 17th March 1752 ... ... ib. 

Treaty entered into by Faris Khan ceding to the English the Govern- 
ment of the castle of Surat, dated 12th March 1758 ... ... 488 

Treaty concluded with Meah Atohund on his accession to the Government 
of Surat, dated 4th March 1759 ... ... ...489 



CLXXIV. 



CLXXV. 



CLXXVI. 



CLXXVII. 



ir 



Perwannah granted to the English for the tunkha and government of 



Surat 



490 



Eepresentation made to the Mogul Emperor by Mr. John Spencer, 

behalf of the English East India Company ... ... ib. 

Perwannah under the Vizier's seal granted to Moyen-ood-Deen Khan to 
act as Governor of Surat ... ... ... 492 

Order under the Vizier's seal to Mr. Spencer to assist and advise 
with Moyen-ood-Deen Khan in the government of Surat ... ib. 

Order under the Vizier's seal to the subjects and inhabitants to acknow- 
ledge Moyen-ood-Deen Khan as Governor of Surat ... ... ib. 

Order under the great seal of the Nawab Vizier-ul-Mumalik Nizam- 
ul-Mulk Bahadoor to Mr. Spencer regarding the government of the 
castle and command of the fleet at Surat, dated 24th June 1759 ... 493 

Perwannahs under the small seal of the Nawab Vizier-ul-Mumalik 
Nizam-ul-MulkBahadoor toMr. J. Spencer .,. ... ... ib. 

Firman under the Great Mogul's seal to the Hon'ble Company for 
holding the government of the castle of Surat, dated 4th September 
1759 ... ... ... ... ... ... 494 

Order under Khan Saman's seal to the Hon'ble Company for holding 
the King's fleet, dated 26th August 1759 ... ... ... ib^ 

Order under the Vizier's seal to Moyen-ood-Deen Khan for the pay- 
ment of the tunkha on account of the fleet to the Hon'ble Company, 
dated 18th September 1759 ... ... , ... -...495 

Order under the seal of Nawab Vizier-ul-Tyfumalik to the Hon'ble Com- 
pany accompanying the firman ... ... ... ... ib. 

Order under the Vizier's seal to Mr. Eichard Bourchier, Governor of 
Bombay ■ ... ... ... ... ... 496 

Similar orders from the Vizier to Mr. Spencer and Moyen-ood-Deen 
Khan, Governor of Surat ... ,., ... ... ib. 

Treaty concluded with Nusseer-ood-Deen Khan for the administration 
and collection' of the revenues of Surat, dated 13th May 1800 ... ib. 

Letter from the Nawab of Surat accepting an annual provision from the 
Hon'ble Company, dated 24th March 1818 ... ... ... 49a 

Letter to the Nawab of Surat regarding the provision assigned to the 
Nawab, dated 20th Aprill818 ... ,., ... ... ib. 





XYIU 



CONTENTS. 



COLABA ,,, ... .,. ... ... ... ... 471 

CLXXVIII. Treaty concluded with Eaghojee Angria recognizing his rights in 

Colaba, dated June 1822 ... ... ... ...499 

Letter from Raghojee Angria regarding the allowances enjoyed by his 
Dewan, dated 4th April 1818 ... ... .... ...602 

Memorandum of assignments made by Eaghojee Angria to his Dewan... ib. 

Letter from Raghojee Angria of Colaba requesting assurance of pro- 
tection on behalf of his Dewan, dated 4th August 1819 ... 504 

Letter to Raghojee Angria of Colaba guaranteeing British protection 
to his Dewan ... ... ... ... ... ib. 

Memorandum of bond fide debts contracted by the Dewan of the Colaba 
State, dated 2nd August 1821 ... ... ... ...505 

Memorandum of privileges enjoyed by Purusram Sreedhur of Angria ... ib. 

. Schedule of territory exchanged with the Chief of Colaba, dated 4th 
September 1828 ... ... .., ... ... 506 



Sa'taea 
CLXXIX 



472 



.Treaty of commerce concluded with the Sou Rajah of Satara, dated 
15th April 1757 ... ... ... ... ... 510 

CLXXX. Treaty of friendship and alliance concluded with the Rajah of Satara, 

dated 25th September 1819 ... ... ... ... 513 

Schedule of territory and revenue ceded to the Rajah of Satara . . . 515 

Agreement concluded with the Rajah of Satara for the cession of 
territory on the Mahableshwur hiUs, dated 16th May 1829 ... 522 

Treaty concluded with Shahjee on his accession to the Rajah of Satara, 
dated 4th September 1839 ... ,., ... ... 524 



CLXXXI. 



CLXXXII. 



NlPANEEKtTE 

Terms granted to Sidoojee Rao Nimbalkar on the restoration of the 
jaghire of Nipaneekur, dated 14th June 1820 



CLXXXIII. 



474 



525 



CONTENTS. XIX 



APPENDICES. 

1. Statement of separate jurisdictions in tLe province of Kattiawar, showing the 

gross revenue and the amount of tribute paid by each Chief, corrected 

up to 1st August 1876 .., ... .,. ... ... iii 

2. Draft of an Agreement proposed to the Peishwa's Government by Mr. Elphin- 

stone, on the 15th March 1815 ... ... ... ... xi 

Draft of an Agreement proposed by the Peishwa's Government on the 5th 

April to be substituted for that presented by Mr. Elphinstone ... sii 

3. Agreement between the Peishwa and Gaekwar regarding the partition of talooka 

Songur and other mehals in Prant Guzerat, executed near Kusba Nuva- 
,pore on the 24th Jemmadee-ool-awul Sunnut Isnein-wu Khumseen-wu 
Myat-wu-Ulf (a. D. 1751-52) ... ... ... ... xv 

4. Agreement with Shreemunt Eajeshree Punt Prudhan regarding the partition of 

the districts of Sonit, Hallar, Gohelwar, and Kattiawar, executed in the . 

year Sunnut Salas-wu Khumseen-wu Myat-wu-Ulf (a. d. 1752-53) . . . xviii 

Memorandum regarding the partition of the talookas in Prant Kattiawar, and 
the Mahee Kanta executed in the year Sunnut Salas-wu Myatein-wu-Ulf 
corresponding with Sumwut 1859, or (a. d. 1802-03) ... ... xix 

5. Translation of Articles of Agreement between the Peishwa and Damajee Kao 

Gaekwar, dated in the Arabic year 1169 ... ... ... xxv 

6. Translation of Articles of Agreement between the Peishwa and Syajee Eao 

Gaekwar ... ... ... ... ... ... xxviii 

7. Memorandum relating to Eutteh Sing Rao Gaekwar 1178 Arabic year (a. d. 

1777-78.) ... ... ... ... ... ■•• xxxvi 

Memorandum relating to Futteh Sing Eao Gaekwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shum- 

sherBahadoor, Arabic year 1179 (a. D. 1778-79) ... ... ... xxxviii 

8. Memorandum relative to Eutteh Sing Eao Gaekwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shum- 

sher Bahadoor 1182 (a. D. 1781-82) ... ... ... xlii 

Translation of a memorandum accompanying the accounts for 1182 . . , xliv 

9. Memorandum regarding Govind Eao Gaekwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher 

Bahadoor, dated in the Arabic year li94 (a. D. 1793-94) ... ... xlv 

Translation of Memorandum of the annual payments to be made by Govind 
Eao, Gaekwar, (whose title is) the powerful Commander of armies in the year 
1198 or (a. D. 1797.) ... ... ■■• •■• •■■ ^l^i 

10. Translation of a Sunnud from His Highness the Peishwa to the Gaekwar 

Government ... ... •■■ ••• ••• •■■ * 

Translation of a Sunnud or Order from Bajee Eao Eughoonath, the Peishwa, to 

Bhugwunt Eao G«,ekwar, dated 2nd Jilhej 1219 Hijree or 24th March 1805 hx 



AirCHISON'S TREATIES. Re .-iscd EJuloTi. 




'B UMBAT B'li'BolBB'i^lC: Y 



& 



^ 



^ 



^ 






b a V T \ 



^ 



:b Divji3i-rj Tiaii>3iD:Ei!0i 



r 



64 -W 32 1« 



Scale 64 MiIm = 1 I»tli. 



6t 



12a Milea 



REFKRENCE. 



1 Palhanpoor 

3 Baroda 

3 Mabikanta 

4 Rewakanta 
6 Camba/ 

6 Sucheen 

7 Bansda 

8 The naung 

9 Dharampoor 

10 Peint 

11 Jowar 



12 Dlirangadra 

13 Nowanagar 

14 JuiiBgurh 

16 Poroandar or Barda 

16 Bhowjiagar and 183 Petty States 

17 Phultun 

18 Sawantwari 

19 Miraj 

SO Jarhkhandi 

21 Savanoor 

33 Jaujira 

PINK 



Bntiah territory. 

Tributary to, in subordinate | 
alliance with, or coutrolled > YELLOW 

by the British Goveriimeut j 

Independent GREEN 



BOMBAY 









AngrtMS 
Mmnk 




Hon^alore 



70' 



7* 



78* 



Exlracl from new 6i- miles Vap of hidia. 



flihlithrd iiiidn- the dirrctimt of Coloiiel U.L.ThoiUii-i . C SI 1' R.S . Surrrvor Gmrml of huUa 

Sufveyoi' (jettn-ml's Off\c^-,L^siicutta ,JXAhf 



i8:« 



TREATIES, ENGAGEMENTS, AND SUNNUDS 



BELATINa 

TO THE STATES 



WITHIN THE 



BOMBAY PRESIDENCY. 



KUTCH AGENCY. 

From Bombay Government RecorAs, No. XV. of new Series and reports hy the 

Bombay Government. 

KwtcL—''Fhe Jharejas of Kutch are said to be a branch of the Samma 
tribe, and to have emigrated from Sind about the fifteenth century under the 
leadership of Jam Lakha, son of Jhara, from whom the tribe derive their name. 
The possessions which the family acquired in Kutch were divided by Lakha's 
three grandsons. About the year 1540, the three branches of the family were 
represented by Jam Dadur, Jam Humeer, and Jam Rawul. Dadur ruled over 
Wagur, or the eastern district of the' province ; and Rawul, aftra* murdering 
his kinsman, Humeer, usurped his possessions and united the western districts, 
or Kutch Proper, under his own government. But Khengar, the son of the 
murdered Humeer, with the help of the king of Ahmedabad, from whom he 
received the district of Morvee and the title of Rao, — a title held by the 
rulers of Kutch ever since, — succeeded not only in recovering his father's 
possessions, but in expelling Jam Rawul from Kutch and reducing Dadur to 
subjection. 

The first Chief of Kutch with whom the British Government formed - 
Treaty relations was Rao Roydhun, who commenced to rule in 1778 and died 
in 1813. Between Khengar and Rao Roydhun there were eleven successions. 
The cruelty and tyranny of Rao Roydhun, who was insane, alienated the 
affections of his Chiefs, who in 1786 seized his person and placed him in 
confinement. The administration was thereafter conducted by an energetic 
soldiei', named Jemadar Futh Mahomed. He was, however, looked upon with 
IV 1 



Kutch Agency— Kuteh.. 



jealousy by the Chiefs, many of whom refused him obedience. Thus in 
1809j* when the first Treaty with Kutch was formed, Hxinsraj, a rival of 
Futh Mahomed, ruled independently in Mandvee in the south-western portion 
of the province, and the other Chiefs, with exception of some of the Jhareja 
Chiefs, who took no part in the quarrel, were divided in their allegiance, some 
acknowledging the supremacy of Futh Mahomed, and others that of Hunsraj. 
Inroads made by Futh Mahomed into Guzerat and Kattiawar, and the piracies 
in which the people of Kutch indulged, provoked the interference of the 
British Government. *In October 1809, Treaties (No. I.) were concluded 
with Filth Mahomed on behalf of the Rao, and with Hunsraj, by which they 
renounced all claim to interfere in the countries to the east of the Gulf of 



* In 1802, when Captain Seton was deputed to Kutcli, tlie Dewan ofEered to conclude ..the 
following Treaty, but owing to the distracted state of the connti-y, it was deemed inexpedient to 
contract any close alliance with Kutch : — 

Ageeement between the Honotjeable Company and Maha Eao EoTDHtTN, Eajah of 
KrTCH, by Captain David Seton, for the Honoueable Company, and Hunseaj Set, 
Dewas, on the part of the Eajah. 

Aeticle 1. 
There shall be an alliance, offensive and defensive, between the two States. 

Article 2. 

When the Eajah requires the assistance of the Honourable Company's troops against hia 
enemies, foreign or domestic, it shall be granted. 

Article 3. 

When the Rajah requires the assistance of the Honourable Company's troops, he shall defray 
the expense of them agreeable to the estimate. 

Aeticle 4. 

Whilst the English troops are in the Rajah's country, he shall give them full possession and 
sovereignty of the place where they are encamped. 

Aeticle 5. 

The Rajah's government shall place no Thannahs or Chokees at the place granted to the 
Honourable Company. 

Aeticle 6. 
No duties shall be taken on provisions coming to the English camp by land or water. 

Aeticle 7. 

The Eajah or his Dewan shall not interfere in the purchases of provisions for the Enelish 
Camp. ^ 

Article 8. 

The English shall not kill the following animals sacred by the Rajah's religion— the cow 
bull, calf, buffaloe, parrot, or pigeon; ' 

Aeticle 9. 
That the English shall respect the places of worship in the' Rajah's country. 



Kuteh Agency— Kutch. 



Kutch and the Runn, and engaged to suppress piracy and to exclude 
Europeans and Americans from their possessions. Hunsraj was also guaranteed 
in the separate possession of MandveCj till such time as the Rao should 
assume the goYernment. 

Notwithstanding repeated remonstranceSj these engagements were not 
keptj piracies were not suppressed. Retaliation was more than once threatened, 
and in 1813 a British officer was deputed to insist on immediate compliance 
with the demands of the British Government. During the negotiations 
Futh Mahomed died on 5th October 1813. Rao Roydhun survived him only 
a month. On his death the succession was disputed between Mansing or 



Abticib 10. 
No European nation shall have permission to have a factory without the consent of the 
Honouiuble Company's government. 

Aeticib 11. 
The Rajah grants to the Honourable Company leave to have a factory in Kutch. 

Aeticlb 12. 
Mandvee being a sacred place, and those that live in it abstaining from animal food, the 
servants of the factory cannot dwell within the town ; but Company's ware-houses and offices 
may be there, and the servants live where they may please to build without the wall, and keep 40 
musquiteers for the protection of their godowns. 

Abticie 13. 
The staples of the Honourable Company imported shall pay a duty of 5 per cent, on the 
amount sales, and then export the same, agreeably to the following list of articles : — 
Imports. — Broad cloth of every kind, copper, tin, lead, iron, steel. 
Exports. — Piece goods, cotton, horses. 

Aeticle 14. 
Soonderjee shall be the medium between the two governments and broker to the factory. 

Aeticlb 15. 
If the Honourable Company wish to attack the Ocka pirates, the Kajah will assist and land 
their troops at Kutchee Gurr. 

Aeticle 16. 

The troops of the two governments shall take Bait, Dwarka, and every place in Ocka where 
pirates are, and after taking them, the collection of the revenues shall remain with Hunsraj and 
Soonderjee, one-fourth to the Eajah, and three-fourths to the Honourable Company. Bait and 
Dwarka being sacred places shall be garrisoned by the Ifutch troops, and the management of the 
government left to Hunsraj and Soonderjee. The troops of both governments shall be at their 
respective expense. 

Aeticle 17. 

If a factory shall be granted the Rajah at Bombay, his staples shall also be at half the 
duties paid by other merchants, as the Honourable Company at Kutch. 



Kutch Agency— Kutch. 



Bharmul, his illegitimate soiij and Ladobaj tlie legitimate son of his brother^ 
The former was supported by Hossein Mian and Ibrahim Mian, the sons of 
Fath Mahomed, and with their assistance succeeded in overcoming his cousin. 
The rule of this Chief, who was afflicted with the same malady as his father, 
presented a succession of the most atrocious cruelties and aggressions on the 
territories of his neighbours. No restraint was put on the lawless inhabitants 
of Wagur, who made constant inroads into Guzerat and Kattiawar, and after 
repeated remonstrances on the part of the British Government, it became 
necessary to move a force into Kutch. On 14th January 1816, a Treaty 
(No. II.) was concluded, by which the Rao agreed to pay indemnity for 
the losses caused by the inroads from Wagur, to suppress piracy, to exclude 
Europeans and Americans and Arab mercenaries from Kutch, and to give no 
shelter to outlaws; and the British Government engaged, in consideration 
of the cession of Anjar and other villages, and the payment of two lakhs 
of corries annually, to reduce the Rao's subjects to his authority and to 
reform the Wagur district. Within a month after the conclusion of this 
Treaty, the whole of Kutch was reduced to the Rao's authority. As the 
country had been greatly impoverished by twenty years of turmoil and mis- 
rule, the British Government, by a supplementary Treaty (No. III.), volun- 
tarily remitted the whole of the military expenses it had incurred, and the 
annual sum which the Rao had engaged to pay. 

Not long after order had been thus restored, the Rao returned to his evil 
courses. He murdered his cousin, Ladoba, deprived many Chiefs of their 
estates, increased his troops, and showed such a manifest hostility to the 
British Government, that the provisions of the Treaty of 1816 were sus- 
pended. The interference of the British Government was again earnestly 
invited by the principal Jhareja Chiefs. A force was therefore moved against 
the Rao in 1819; the Rao was deposed, and his son, Daisul, was placed in 
power under a regency, consisting of some of the Jhareja Chiefs, aided by 
the British Resident; and a new Treaty (No. IV.) was signed on 13th 
October 1819. This Treaty, besides renewing the provisions of former 
engagements, guaranteed the integrity of Kutch from foreign or domestic 
enemies, secured the location of a British force in Kutch, to be paid for by 
that State, excluded the civil and criminal jurisdiction of the British Govern- 
ment from Kutch, prohibited the Rao from political correspondence with and 
aggressions on other States, provided for the suppression of infanticide, 
and guaranteed the estates of the Chiefs on condition of their engaging 



Eutch Agency— Kutoh. 



to abstain from tliat crime. In 1828 the 20th Article of the Treaty^ which 
.provided that all supplies for the use of the British troops in Kutch should 
pass through the Rao's territory free of duty, was abrogated in consequence 
of the abuses to which it gave rise. 

One of the first acts of the regency was to restore certain Wagur Chiefs 
to their estates on their engaging (No. V.) to preserve the peace. 

In 1822 the district of Anjar was restored to Kutch by Treaty 
(No. VI.) in consideration of an annual payment of Rupees 88,000. The 
only payment which had hitherto been required from the State of Kutch 
was a contribution of two lakhs of rupees towards the expense of the 
British subsidiary force. This, however, was not paid with regularity, and 
a large debt was allowed to accumulate. In 1832, therefore, a new Treaty 
(No. VII.) was executed, remitting to Kutch all arrears, and limiting the 
demand to two lakhs of rupees, to be reduced in proportion to reductions 
made in the subsidiary force, provided that the sum to be paid should never be 
less than Rupees 88,000. 

In 1833 Rao Daisul was allowed to take part in the transaction of public 
business. The progress which he made was so great that it was resolved 
to make over to him the entire administration a year sooner than had been 
originally intended. Accordingly, in 1834 the Rao was by Treaty (No. VIII.) 
placed in power. The Rao was always conspicuous in his attachment to the 
British Government. In 1836 he abolished (No. IX.) the importation of 
slaves into Kutch. In 1840 be exempted from duty vessels forced into 
Mandvee by stress of weather. The rules then framed were superseded by 
other Rules (No. X.) in 1851, and in 1873 the States of Joonagurh, Bhow- 
nuggur, Nowanuggur, and Porebunder agreed (No. XL) to allow to Kutch 
vessels driven into their ports by stress of weather the same exemption 
from customs as is granted to their vessels under these rules by the Rao of 
Kutch. , 

Vigorous measures were taken for the suppression of infanticide in Kutch, 
where the crime was very prevalent. Special provision was made for its sup- 
pression in the Treaty of 1819, and in March 1840 the engagement was 
renewed (No. XII.) by the Jhareja Chiefs, who promised to render a yearly 
return of all the sons and daughters born to them, and to take other measures 
for the prevention of the crime of infanticide. These engagements were renewed 



Kutch Agency— Kutch. 



in 1846 (No. XIII.). An Engagement (No. XIV.) was also made in 1842 
with the head of the Hothi tribe, who claim affinity with the Jharejas. These 
measures have been attended with the most satisfactory results. In 1842 the 
proportion of males to females of the Jhareja tribe in Kutch was as 8 to 1. 
In 1852 it was as 3 to 1, and in 1868 it was as 1-04 to 1. 

The Rao of Kutch has supreme authority within his own estates, but 
only a limited jurisdiction in those of his Chiefs to whom the collective term 
of Bhayad has generally been applied from the fact of their being descended 
with few exceptions from the same ancestor as himself. The Bhayad pay no 
revenue ; they take cognizance of all minor offences on their own estates, and 
except in serious cases, such as murder and dacoity, claim immunity from inter- 
ference on the part of the Durbar. In return they are bound to furnish 
troops on any great emergency, and on certain occasions they make a custo- 
mary present to the Rao. The estates of the Bhayad do not descend according 
to the law of primogeniture, but a system of subdivision prevails which has 
in many cases become so minute as to render the guarantee holders unfit to 
exercise the jurisdiction contemplated in the settlement of 1819 when their 
numbers were only half what they have now reached. Secured by the 
guarantee in the possession of their estates, the Bhayad resisted all improve- 
ments, refused allegiance to their Chief, and sought a living by plunder and 
oppression. Rao Daisul in his turn attempted to assert a more complete 
authority over his Chiefs, to acquire claims over their lands by purchase and 
mortgage, to promulgate laws without their consent, to issue processes to 
their subjects, and to dispense in a measure with the advice which he was 
bound under the Treaty of 1834 to take from the council of the Bhayad. 

These pretensions were discountenanced by the Bombay Government, but 
a proposal to place restrictions on the Rao's issue of processes was not accepted 
by him as he regarded it as an infringement of his legitimate 'authority. The 
question therefore remained open. 

Rao Daisul died in 1860, and was succeeded by his eldest son, Pragmul. 
Soon after his accession to power Rao Pragmul showed a disposition to increase 
his influence at the expense of the Bhayad by restoring the innovations 
condemned in his father's lifetime, by creating fresh impositions in the 
shape of fines on the Chiefs and their vassals, and by minute interference in 
civil cases. To remedy this state of things it was proposed to define the 



Eutch Agency— Eutch. 



limits of the Rao's power, to determine who were guarantee holders according 
to the original agreement, and to re-organize the council of the Bhayad, 
but the Rao deprecated any curtailment of his powers over the BHSyad and 
claimed sovereign jurisdiction. 

The British Government determined to maintain the Chiefs in the 
full enjoyment of their possessions and rights as they existed at the time 
of the Treaty of 1819, and to mediate between the Rao and his Bhayad so 
as to maintain the equilibrium of power as it existed at the time of the Treaty. 
On the other hand it was necessary to encourage and strengthen the Rao in 
the full exercise of all his legitimate rights. It was further laid down that 
the British Government was under no obligation to enforce the engage- 
ment in the Treaty of 1834 which provided for the government of the 
country by the Rao under the advice of his ministers and the Bhayad. 
In regard to the general administration, the Rao was to be left in the exer- 
cise of full authority in his own lands : as to the estates of the Chiefs it was 
proposed that the Rao should have a council whom he would be bound to consult. 
In case of difference the council, or the Chief whose interests were affected, 
might appeal to the British representative and finally to the Bombay Govern- 
ment. Existing holders of jurisdiction were to be classified on a combined 
consideration of their possessions and intelligence, a certain amount of civil 
and criminal jurisdiction being assigned to them, and the remainder to the 
Rao through the council. A concession was made to the Rao that his minis- 
ter should represent him in the council. These principles were embodied 
in a draft agreement, but it was not acceptable to the Rao, and certain modifi- 
cations were introduced which in 1868 received the approval of the Supreme 
Government and the Home authorities, as a compromise providing in all 
reasonable respects for the maintenance of the recognized rights of the Rao. 
The latter however strongly objected to the terms of this agreement as 
tending to raise unduly the status of some of the Bhayad, to curtail his own 
authority and to introduce innovations opposed to the usage of the country. 
As the British Government was desirous to obtain the cordial concurrence 
of the Chief in any improvements in the administration, he was allowed 
the fullest possible opportunity of urging his objections to any proposals which 
might be thought supposed to in any way affecting his rights, and in 1872 
he found himself in a position to propose an Agreement (No. XV.) for the 
constitution of the Bhayad court, which met with the general concurrence of 
the British Government. A modification of clause 5 was introduced enabling 



Kutch Agency— Kutch. 



the Durbar on the advice of the Political Agent to call for and quash the pro- 
ceedings of any Chief shown to have been guilty of gross injustice. These 
arrangements are liable to revision or modification hereafter, should circum- 
stances require such a coursCj in communication with the Rao. At the same 
time the Bhayad were given to understand that the continuance of the guaran- 
tee in each individual case would depend upon their faithful allegiance to the 
Durbar, the performance of such duties as the British Government might 
consider attached to their tenures, and the general good administration and 
government of their estates. Rules of procedure based on the British civil 
and criminal codes were introduced, but the working of the court was un- 
satisfactory : amended rules were therefore introduced and the tribunal was 
transferred to the Rao who appointed his deputy minister as President. 

In 1871 the Rao of Kutch at the instance of the Political Agent declared 
his willingness to adopt reciprocal measures for the surrender of alleged 
offenders from any neighbouring State having first class jurisdiction at 
the request of their Chief preferred through the Political Agent, but no 
formal engagement was submitted for the sanation of the British Govern- 
ment. 

Amongst other foreigners, natives of Kutch have established themselves 
in considerable numbers at Zanzibar, and in 1869 the Rao of Kuteh issued 
a Proclamation (No. XVI.) to the inhabitants of Kutch, and more particu- 
larly to those trading with Zanzibar and the Arabian and African coasts, 
warning them against the penalties they would incur by engaging in the 
slave trade, and informing them that their claims and suits were to be settled 
by the British Governnent in the same way as if they were subjects 
of the British Government, ^ 

In 1872 the Rao of Kutch issued fresh Proclamations (No. XVII.) 
to his subjects at Zanzibar and Muscat, stating his determination to put a 
stop to their participation in the slave trade, and declaring that any of his 
subjects directly engaging or indirectly assisting in the trafiic would be 
punishable by the British Government, which he empowered to. deal with such 
persons as with its own subjects, and that all property in Kutch belonging to 
persons convicted of the offence would be confiscated. He also deputed his 
minister to co-operate with Sir Bartle Frere, who was then employed as Her 



Kutch Agency— Kutch. 



Majesty's special envoy for the more effectual suppression of the East African 
slave trade, to make enquiries into the participation of Kutch subjects in 
the slave trade, and prosecute those found to have been engaged in it. This 
spontaneous action on the part of the Rao was cordially recognized by the 
British Government. 

In 1873 the Rao abolished transit duties in "Wagur and thus completed 
the freedom of Kutch from a tax which had been discontinued in the other 
districts since 1856. 

r 

Rao Pragmul who had received the right of adoption (No. XVIII.) died 
in January 1876, and was succeeded by his eldest son Khengar the present 
Chief, a minor, ten years of age. 

The population of Kutch amounts to about 500,000 souls. The estimated 
area is 6,500 square miles, exclusive of the Runn of Kutch which covers 
9,000 square miles. The gross revenue of the Rao, which is annually farmed 
out, is Rupees 13,00,000 : that of the subordinate Chiefs or Bhayad aggregates 
Rupees 8,00,000. The State pays a tribute of Rupees 1,86,949 to the Bri- 
tish Government, which is liable to be reduced to a minimum of Rupees 
88,000 in the event of the reduction of the subsidiary force. 

The Rao of Kutch is entitled to a salute of seventeen guns. 

The military force of the State consists of 3 field and 109 other guns, 
24 artillerymen, 373 cavalry, AO^ regular and 3,139 irregular infantry, and 
412 police. In addition to these troops the Rao's Bhayad could furnish on 
requisition a mixed force of about 4,000 men. 



IV 



Kutch Agency— Kutch~No. I. n 



No. I. 

Aeticles of Ageeement between the Honoueable East India Company, entered into by 
Captain Samuel Adam Geeenwood, under tbe orders of Lieutenant-Colonel 
Walkee, Resident, with the Vizaeut Jemadae Futteh Mahomed and his son 
NoTiAE HussAiN Meeja, on behalf of the Maha Eao Sheee Eotdhunjeb, vis -. — 

Aeticle 1. 

As friendship exists between the government of the Honourable Com- 
pany and the government o£ the Maharaja Anund Rao GuikWar Sena Khas 
Kheyl on the one part and the government of the Maha Rao Shree Roydhun 
on the other, it is agreed that no troops shall cross to the country to the east 
or opposite side of the Gulf and Runn lying between Kutch and Guzeratj nor 
shall any claim or interference be therein maintained. 

Aeticle 2. 

The above Article is indispensable, but as the Maha Rao Mirza Roydhua 
possesses old claims on Nowanuggur, it is agreed that these as well as any 
other demands, either pecuniary or otherwise, which exist, or ma}' arise, shall 
be settled agreeably to equity and justice, and with due regard to the character 
of Maha Rao Shree, by the decision of three people, one on behalf of the 
Honourable Company, one on behalf of the Maha Rao Shree, and a third on 
behalf of the parties on whom the claims are made. 

Aeticle 3. 

The Maha Rao Shree Roydhun engages that piracy shall be eradicated 
throughout the country of Kutch. Should any piracy take place, the pirates 
should be punished and expelled from the country. 

Article 4. 

Maha Rao Shree Roydhun engages not to permit any establishment 
whatever to be made in the country by any European or American power or 
any of those nations to remain therein. 

To the truth of the above God is' witness. 

Dated 161^ of Bamzan 1224 Hegiree, corresponding with the 3rd of 
Asinoud 1809. 

Confirmed by the Governor General of India on 7th December 1809. 



Aeticles of Engagement entered into by Dewan Hunseaj Samedass of Mandaveb 
BuNDEE, with Captain Samuel A. Geeenwood, on behalf of the Honoueablb 
Company, as follows : — 

Aeticle 1. 
As friendship exists between the government of the Honourable Com- 
pany and the government of the Maharaja Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher 



12 Kutch Agency— Kuteh~No. I. 



Bahadoor on tte one part, and the government of the Maha Rao Shree Roy- 
dhun on the other, I do hei-eby agree that no troops shall cross to the country 
on the opposite side of the Gulf and Runn (lying between Kutch and 
Guzerat) , nor shall any claim or interference be maintained therein ; should 
any claim or dispute arise, the same shall be settled by arbitration, under the 
mediation of the Company. 

Article 2. 
Hunsraj Sa, Dewan, engages, on behalf of the Maha Rao Roydhun, that 
piracy shall be eradicated throughout the territories subject to Mandavee; 
should any act of piracy occur, the pirates shall be punished and expelled the 
• country. 

Aeticle 3. 

Hunsraj Sa, Dewan, also engages, on behalf of the Maha Rao Roydhun, 
not to permit any European or American power to form an establishment 
at Mandavee and its dependencies, nor to permit any (of these nations) to 
remain therein. 

Dated 1865 Assoin Vud 5tA, corresponding with 28tk October A.D. 1809. 

Written by Hunsraj Samedass. What is above written is truth. 



Teanslation of a Papee to the address of the Honoueable Company from Dewan 
HuNSEAj Samedass of Mandatee BtrifDEE. 

I, Hunsraj Samedass of Mandavee Bunder, the Dewan and servant of 
Maha Rao Mirza Roydhun, wishing to preserve and secure to my sovereign 
and master the possession of Mandavee Bunder in peace and tranquillity, do 
hereby require the protection of the Honourable Company on the following 
terms and conditions : — 

Aeticle 1. 

The town and port of Mandavee, its villages and dependencies, to be 
maintained in ray possession on behalf of the said Maha Rao Mirza Roydhun, 
to whom, his heirs and successors, the said dependencies shall be restored under 
the guarantee of the Company ; whenever he or they shall be restored to the 
exercise of their legal and uucontroUed authority, and when my sovereign 
shall assume the government of this country, this port of Mandavee and its 
dependencies shall be delivered up to him. 

Aeticle 2. 

In order to give effect to the above Article, and to ensure its execution, 
an Agent on the part of the Honourable Company, who shall be attended by 
a guard of 40 men, shall reside at Mandavee, so long as the place may remain 
in my possession, but to be afterwards subject to such arrangement in respect 
to remaining or being dismissed as the sovereign Maha Rao may agree to. 



Kutch Agency— Kutch— No. II. 13 



Aeticle 3. 

For the expenses of this establishment an annual nuzzerana of Rupees 
18,000 shall be paid to the Honourable Company's Government in four instal- 
ments, viz., commencing from the arrival of the Company's Agent. 

, Article 4. 

In the event of any persons attempting to gain possession of Mandavee 
and its dependencies, the Honourable Company will be pleased to extend their 
aid and protection to the extent of two battalions, with their proportion of 
Artillery, the expenses of which shall be defrayed, at the rate of Rupees 
82,500 per month for each battalion, payable in monthly instalments, during 
the employment of the troops, and to be returned when I have no further occa- 
sion for them. 

Akticle 5. 

It is to be understood that the employment of this force is intended 
solely for the defence of Mandavee and for its preservation under my manage- 
ment, and therefore should any person become the enemy of Mandavee, the 
Sircar will arrange with them. 

Akticle 6. 

My sole object being to secure under the protection of the Honourable 
Company the possessions of my sovereign in peace and tranquillity, I engage 
to enter into any terms of accommodation with Futteh Mahomed that may 
appear advisable and conducive to this end, and which may receive the sanc- 
tion of the Honourable Company. 

Signed for Seth Hunsraj Samedass 
by JoEE Sa. 
What is above written has my consent when the parties arrive. 
Dated Sumwut 1366, Kartich Soodh hth, A.D. 1809, November l%th. 
Confirmed by the Governor General of India on 6th January 1810. 



No. II. 

Aeticlbs of a Teeatt of Alliance between the Honoubable English East India Com- 
pany and His Hiohness Mahaeaj Mieza Eao Bhaemuljee of Kutch, agreed to 

by both GOVBENMENTS. 

Article 1. 
A firm and lasting peace and amity shall hereafter exist between the 
contracting governments. 



14 Kutch Agency — Kuteh— No. II. 



AUTICLB 2. 

The people of the Kutch District of Wagur having' committed unpro- 
voked depredations in the mehals of their Highnesses the Peishwa and 
Guikwar in the peninsula of Kattywar, the Maha Rao engages to reimburse 
the losses sustained by their aggressions, and also to defray the military 
expenses incurred in consequence according to a separate deed by which the 
Maha Rao engages to abide. 

Article 3. 

His Highness the Maha Rao engages to become responsible to the 
Peishwa" s, Guikwar's, and Honourable Company's governments for any loss 
which their subjects may hereafter sustain by depredations from subjects of the 
Kutch State. 

Article 4. 
The^subjects of the Kutch State shall on no account cross the Gulf or 
Runn,for hostile purposes, neither shall they cross to act against the subjects 
oiyme Honourable Company or those of Shreemunt Peishwa or the Guikwar. 
-^he subjects of the aforesaid three governments shall (in like manner) not 
cross the Gulf or Runn for hostile purposes against the Rao's subjects. The 
fort of Anjar, &c., having been ceded to the Honourable Company, no ob- 
jections exist to troops and stores crossing the Gulf or Ruun for that place. 

Article 5. 
His Highness the Rao binds himself to suppress in the most effectual 
manner the practice of piracy throughout his dominions and coasts, and 
engages to make good any losses sustained by vessels sailing under the 
pass of the Honourable Company by piracies committed from the ports 
in Kutch. The practice of confiscating property wrecked on the coast shall 
from this date be suppressed, and His Highness engages to cause all property 
thus sequestrated to be returned to the legal owner. 

Article 6. 
His Highness the Rao engages that no foreign, European, or American 
force of any description, or agent of any of those powers, shall be permitted 
to pass through or reside in the State of Kutch, 

Article 7. 
The Rao binds himself to prohibit the admission of Arab mercenaries 
into Kutch. Arabs resorting for mercantile purposes shall not be permitted 
to leave any of their followers. They shall return with the merchants. This 
shall be particularly attended to. In consideration, however, of the situation 
of Luckput on the borders of Sindh, and for the object of Iseeping the 
district of Wagur in subjection, the Rao shall retain in his service'Arab 
Sebundy not exceeding in number four hundred men. 



Eutch Agency—Kutch— No. II. 15 



Article 8. 

The Honourable Company, in consideration of the distracted state of the 
government of Rao Bharmuljee, and its inability to fulfil the above obligations 
without aid, engage to cause such possessions as have been alienated by the 
treachery of his servants to be restored to His Highness's authority ; any of 
the servants above alluded to returning to their allegiance through the media- 
tion of the Honourable Company shall have their affairs arranged in a manner 
meeting the wishes of both governments. 

Article 9. 

The district of Wagur, a dependency of the Kutch State, will require 
to undergo a thorough reform. The prohibition which exists to the Rao enter- 
taining Arab Sebundy beyond a limited number disables him from effecting 
a settlement of that district satisfactorily to the Honourable Company. The 
latter, therefore, agree to aid His Highness with a force to arrange this 
talooka in a manner suitable to the objects of both governments, so that it 
remain obedient to the Rao^s authority, who binds himself, as in Article 3rd, 
to be responsible for the future acts of the people. 

Article 10. 
As a friendly return for the essential services thus engaged to be per- 
formed. His Highness the Rao agrees to cede to the Honourable Company in 
perpetuity the fort of Anjar, with villages, including Toorea Bunder, and in 
addition engages to pay in perpetuity an annual sum of two lakhs of corries 
(Rao Shai) in cash to the Honourable Company. The particulars of this 
Article are contained in a separate deed. 

Article 11. 

The slaughter of cows and bullocks being directly at variance with the 
religion of the Jharejas and the greater portion of the natives of Kutch, the 
Honourable Company engages to abstain from the slaughter of those animals 
within the limits of Kutch, and from violating the religious prejudices of 
the Rao's subjects. 

Article 12. 

His Highness the Rao engages not to allow a Bharwuttea of the 
Shreemunt Peishwa, Guikwar, or Honourable Company's governments to 
reside within his territory, and (in like manner) the above three governments 
engage not to permit a Bharwuttea of the Rao's, country to reside in then- 
mehals. In the event, however, of a Bharwuttea residing within a foreign 
State and committing acts of depredation from thence, the power affording 
him an asylum shall be considered responsible. 

Article 13. 
A representative of the Honourable Company's government shall reside 
with the Rao in the capital, in order that all questions which may arise 



16 Kutoh Agency—Kutch— No. II. 

between the contracting' governments be discussed in a friendly manner, and 
the engagements of both parties be watched over and preserved inviolate. 
This vakeel shall not listen to any complaints either from the Rao's Bhayad 
or his ministers ; at the Rao's request, however, the Sircar will afford him 
its best advice. 

The above thirteen Articles of Treaty shall be adhered to by the 
Rao, his heirs and successors, and the Honourable Company. 

Done at Bhooj on the fourteenlh day of January, A.I). 1816. 

(Sd.) James Macmurdo, 

Employed on a mission to Kutch by the 
Bombay Government. 

Ratified by the Right Honourable the Governor General of India in 
Council on the 9th March 1816. 



Teanslation of a Deed executed by Mahabaj Mieza Eao Bhaemttljee of Kutch, in 
favour of the Honoueable English East India Company. 

Article 1. 
My Sircar, as a friendly gift, has for ever done over to you by deed the 
fort of Anjar with villages, including Toorea Bunder, according to the fol- 
lowing list : — 



Anjar Town. 
Meethee Rohur. 
Keedheua. 
Rutnal. 

Puswallia Khasi. 
Ditto Meethee. 
Sidoogura. 
Nargulpore, small. 
Pudhanoo. 
Rapore. 

Borickamegpore. 
Varsamiree. 



Toorea, port inclusive. 

Khasee Rohur. 

Shirai. 

Anterjal. 

Sutapore. 

Supurdha. 

Sugallia. 

Nargulpore, large. 

Kokra. 

Bhumasir. 

Nugal. 

Morsin. 



According to the above list, I have given you the fort and bunder, inclusive 
24 villages, and surrender to you all sovereignty, control, and produce in those 
places that my Sircar has enjoyed. Any charitable, religious, or other ancient 
gifts of my government shall be investigated by the Honourable Company, 
and on authentic papers being produced, the Honourable Company's govern- 
ment shall continue them. Grassias who have enjoyed grass from ancient 
times in the pergunnah or in Anjar shall not be obstructed by the Honourable 
Company in receiving their produce. Disputes regarding villages, boundaries. 



Kutch Agency— Kutoh— No. III. 17 



or disputes of any kind between the subjects of tbe two governments shall 
be adjusted by two persons on the part of the Sircars, agreeably to justice. 
One Sircar shall not send orders or mohsuls on the subjects of the other ; 
subjects or inhabitants of the above places coming to me to complain, I shall 
not listen to them. 

Article 3. 

In addition to the above deed I have agreed to pay to the Honourable 
Company from my government an annual sum of two lakhs of Rao Shai 
corries j this cash is to be paid in two kists, as follows : — 

1,00,000 1 Lakh corries on Assar Soodh 2nd. 
1,00,000 1 Lakh ditto on Pons Soodh 2nd. 

2,00,000 



In this manner I am to pay two lakhs of corries annually for ever, and 
should the corries not be paid on the stipulated dates, I am to pay interest 
at the rate of 9 per cent, per annum. 

I have given these two Articles in writing to the Honourable Company's 
Sircar of my own free will ; I and my heirs and successors are to abide by 
them. 

Done Siimwut 187«2, Pous Vud Znd, Tuesday, \^th January 1816. 

This Deed was ratified by the Right Honourable the Governor General 
of India in Council under date the 9th March 1816. 



No. III. 

StrPPLEMENTAET Teeatt witli KuTCH in 1816. 

The Honourable Company and the Rao's Sircar concluded a Treaty of 
thirteen Articles on the 14th January 1816; supplementary to these, however, 
the following two are valid : — 

AUTICLB 1. 

The Right Honourable the Governor General in Council has ratified 
the thirteen Articles of Treaty concluded on the 14th January 1816 be- 
tween the English Sircar and that of His' Highness the Raoj but as His 
Highness's government is newly established, and ig responsible in the 2nd 
Article of the Treaty for a debt of twenty lakhs of rupees, which it would 
find much difficulty in discharging, the Honourable Company, guided by feel- 
ings of friendship, relinquishes as a voluntary gift the sum of eight lakhs 
thirteen thousand eight hundred and seventy-six Rupees, being the amount 
charged to its inilitary expenses. 

IV ^ 



18 



Kutch Agency— Kutch— No. IV. 



Article 2. 

In order still further to aid the Maha Rao's government, and as a testi- 
mony of the interest which the Honourable Company takes in its welfare, 
the latter does of its own free will relinquish the annual sum of two lakhs of 
corries which the Rao has agreed to pay by the 10th Article of the aforesaid 
Treaty. It is hoped that these disinterested and friendly aids conferred by 
the Honourable Company on His Highness the Rao will induce the latter to 
repose perfect confidence to act with unanimity and to preserve inviolate the 
stipulations contained in the original Treaty. 

Bone at Bhooj this Tnesday, the eighteenth day of June a.d. 1816. 



Seal. 



(Sd.) 


James Macmurdo, 




Besident at Bhoy 


(Sd.) 


MOIEA. • 


3i 


N. B. Edmonstone. 


)> 


Archibald Seton. 


}) 


G. 


DOWDESWELL. 




• 


Seal. 





Ratified by the Governor General in Council at Fort William this 
twenty-first of September one thousand eight hundred and sixteen. 

(Sd.) John Adam, 

Secretary to Govt. 



No. IV. 
Teeatt of Alliance between the Honoueable East India Company and His Hishness 
Mahaeaja Mieza Rao Sheee Dessuljee, Ms heirs and successors, concluded by 
Captain James Macmuedo, on the part of the Honoueable Company, and by 
Jhaeejab PEriHEEAjjEE, Vijeeajjee, Meeamun jee, Peagjee ; Peagjee Mokajeb, 
Allyajee, Nonghitnjee, Bhanjee, and Jeymuljee, by virtue of fuU powers from 
their respective Goveenments.. 

1 :^Y^^''^'^^ ^.'^T^? "^ alliance, consisting of thirteen Articles, was con- 
eluded on the 16th January 1816, with two supplementary Articles, under 
datelSth June 1816, between the Honourable East India Company and the 
Mahara] Rao Bharmuljee and his successors. In consequence, however of 
the hostile conduct of the said Rao towards the Honourable Company, and 
his tyranny and oppression to his Bhayad, it has become necessary for the 



Kutch Agency— Kutch~No. IV. 19 

stability of the alliance between the contracting parties to make certain 
alterations in the above mentioned Treaty. 

Akticle 1. 
It is hereby declared that all Articles of the aforesaid Treaty which are 
not modified or superseded by any of the Articles in the present Treaty shall 
be considered good and valid. 

Aeticle 2. 

Agreeably to the desire of the Jhareja Bhayad, the Honourable Company 
agrees in declaring Bharmuljee to have forfeited all claims to the guddee of 
Kutch, and he is accordingly solemnly deposed. The said Bharmuljee shall 
reside in Bhooj as a State prisoner, under a guard of British troops, subject, 
however, to be removed to a place of further security in the event of his 
being implicated in any intrigue, the Kutch government agreeing to pay 
annually the sum of 36,000 corries through the Honourable Company for the 
subsistence of the said Bharmuljee. 

Article 3. 

The infant son of the late Rao Bharmuljee having been unanimously 
elected by the Jhareja Chiefs to succeed to the vacant throne, he and his 
legitimate offspring are accordingly acknowledged by the Honourable Com- 
pany as the lawful sovereigns of Kutch under the name and title of Maha- 
rajah Mirza Rao Dessuljee. 

Akticle 4. 

In consequence of the minority of the present Rao Dessul, the Jhareja 
Bhayad, with the Honourable Company's advice, determine that a regency 
shall be formed with full powers to transact the affairs of the government. 
The following are chosen as the members : Jhareja Vijerajjee of Somri Roha, 
Jhareja Prutherajjec of Na'ugercha, Rajgoor Odhowjee Hirbhoy, Mehta 
Luckmidas Wullubjee, Khuttri Ruttonsi Jettani, and the British Resident 
for the time being. These six persons are entrusted with the executive manage- 
ment of the government of Kutch ; and in order that they may perform the 
service of the State with effect, the Honourable Company agree to afford the 
regency their guarantee, until the Rao completes his twentieth year, when the 
minority ceases. - * 

Article 5. 
The Honourable Company engages to guarantee the power of His High- 
ness the Rao Dessul, his heirs and successors, and the integrity of his domi- 
nions, from foreign or domestic enemies. 

Article 6. 

The Honourable Company, at the desire of Rao Shree Dessul and the 

Jhareja Bhayad, for the security of the government of Kutch, agrees to leave 

a British force in its service. For the payment of this force, Rao Shree 

Dessuljee and the Jhareja Bhayad agree that funds shall be appropriated from 



20 Kutch Agency— Kutch— No. IV. 

the revenues of Kutch. The Honourable Company retains to itself the option 
of reducing or entirely withdrawing its troops (and relieving Kutch from the 
expense) whenever, in the opinion of government7the efficiency and strength 
of the Rao's authority may admit of its being done with safety. 

Aeticle 7. 

The money stipulated for in the preceding Article is to be paid in instal- 
ments, each of four months, and it is further engaged that the regency 
appointed in the 4th Article shall enter into a separate responsibility for the 
regular payment of the above kists. 

Aeticle 8. 

The Kutch government engages not to allow any Arabs, Seedees, or 
other foreign mercenaries to remain in its territories, nor generally to entertain 
any soldiers, not natives of Kutch, without the consent of the Honourable 
Company's government. 

Aeticle 9. 

The Kutch government agrees that no foreign vessels, American, European, 
or Asiatic, shall be allowed to import into the territories of Kutch arms or 
military stores. The Honourable Company engages to supply the wants o£ 
the Kutch government in these articles at a fair valuation. 

Aeticle 10. 

The Honourable Company engages to exercise no authority over the 
domestic concerns of the Rao or of those of any of the Jhareja Chieftains 
of the country; that the Rao, his heirs and successors, shall be absolute 
masters of their territory, and that the civil and criminal jurisdiction of the 
British Government shall not be introduced therein. 

Aeticle 11. 
It is clearly understood that the views of the British Government are 
limited to the reform and organization of the military establishment of the 
Kutch government, to the correction of any abuses which may operate 
oppressively on the inhabitants, and to the limitation of the general expenses 
of the State within its resources. 

Aeticle 12. 
The Rao, his heirs and successors, engage not to enter into negotiations 
with any Chief or State without the sanction of the British Government, but 
their customary amicable correspondence with friends and relations shall 
continue. 

Aeticle 13. 

The Rao, his heirs and successors, engage not to commit aggressions 
on any Chief or State, and if any disputes with such Chief or State accident- 
ally arise, they are to be submitted for adjustment to the arbitration of 
the Honourable Company. 



Kutch Agency— Kuteh— No. IV. 21 



Article 14. 

The Kao, his heirs and successors, engage to afford what mih'tary force 
they may possess to the aid of the Honourable Company's government upon 
its requisition. This Article, however, is not to be understood as imposing 
any duties on the Jhareja Bhayad contrary to their established customs. 

Article 15. 
The Kutch ports shall be open to all British vessels, in like manner as 
British ports shall be free to all vessels of Kutch, in order that the most 
friendly intercourse may be carried on between the governments. 

Article 16. 
The British Government, with the approbation of that of Kutch, engages 
to guarantee by separate deeds the Jhareja Chiefs of the Bhayad, and 
generally all Rajpoot Chiefs in Kutch and Wagur, in full enjoyment of 
their possessions, and further to extend the same protection to Mehta Luck- 
midas Wullubjee, who, for the welfare of the Kutch Durbar, has acted in 
concert with the Jharejas, and with great zeal and sincerity. 

Article 17. 
His Highness the Rao, his heirs and successors, at the particular instance 
of the Honourable Company, engage to abolish in their own family the 
practice of infanticide; they also engage to join heartily with the Honourable 
Company in abolishing the custom generally through the Bhayads of Kutch. 

Article 18. 
Previously to the execution of the deed of guarantee in favour of the 
Jhareja Bhayad, according to the tenor of the 16th Article, a written engage- 
ment shall be entered into by them to abstain from the practice of infanticide, 
and specifying that in case any of them do practice it, the guilty person shall 
submit to a punishment of any kind that may be determined by the Honour- 
able Company's government and the Kutch Durbar. 

Article 19. 
The British Resident or his Assistant shall reside in Bhooj, and be treated 
with appropriate respect by the government of Kutch. 

Article 20. 
All supplies 5oMa/^e for the use of -the Honourable Company's troops 
shall pass through the Rao's territories free of Rahdarree duties. 

Article 31. 
It being contrary to the religious principles of the Jharejas and people 
of Kutch, that cows, bullocks, and peacocks should be killed, the Honourable 
Company agree not to permit these animals to be killed m the territory ot 
Kutch^ or to permit in any way the religion of the natives to be obstructed. 



22 Kuteh Agency— Kutch— Wo. V. 



These twenty-one Articles are binding to the Rao, ,his heirs and succes- 
sors, for ever, and to the Honourable Company. 

Bone at Bhooj on the thirteenth day of October A. B. 1819. 

(Sd.) James Macmurdo, Captain, 

And Resident in, Kutch. 



The Governor 
General's 
small Seal 



(Sd.) Hastings. 
„ J. Stewart. 

„ J. Adam. 



Ratified by His Excellency the Governor General in Council this fourth 
day of December a. d. 1819. 

(Sd.) C. T. Metcalfe, 

Secretary. 



No. V. 



Deed passed to Maha Eao Sheee Desstjlj^ee by Waghela Veesajee, Sutajeeanee, 
Pbbmsingjee, Eamjbbanee, Mehebjee, Dewajbeanbb, Eamsingjbe, Bhojeajee- 
aneb, and the whole Bhatad of Bela, dated Choitro Vud 5th, Sumwut 1875, or 15th 
April A. D. 1819. 

The Durbar, as a punishment for our bad conduct, had deprived us of our 
villages and geeras : at present, however, the Honourable Company's army 
having accomplished a reform in the aifairs of the Durbar, the English gov- 
ernment has graciously interfered and restored to us our geeras, &c. We do 
therefore engage that henceforth none of us shall be guilty of improper or 
troublesome conduct, and we engage to abide by the following Articles : — 

Aeticlb 1. 

We engage to countenance or protect in no way any Bharwuttea or 
criminal of either of the two Sircars of the Honourable Company and the Rao, 
or encourage any person to disturb the peace. 

Article 3. 

We shall permit no person who thieves or steals to live in our lands, nor 
shall we listen to any such people. Should any person living in our lands 
commit any act of plunder, and tht fact be ascertained to be positive, we 
engage to become responsible individually for the act to both Sircars, and to 
surrender the criminals to the Durbar. 

Article 3. 
Should travellers be plundered in our lands, or should any property be 
lost, we engage to become responsible, agreeably to the order of the Durbar, 
to remove the crime from ourselves by establishing it satisfactorily elsewhere. 



Kutch Agency— Kutch— No. V. 23 



Abticle 4. 

Should we have any dispute with our neighbouring Bhomias and Gras- 
sias relative to boundaries, &c., we engage to refer the dispute to the arbitra- 
tion of both Sircars. We engage to have " Ver " (feuds) with none. 

Article 5. 
Should a Grassia or other person attempt to leave our lands with the 
intent of having a feud^ or disturbing the peace, we will prevent him ; if he 
goes by force, we will instantly inform the Durbar. 

Article 6. 

Should Dhara or plunderers attempt to pass through our lands with the 
intention of depredating, we will not permit them to pass. If they proceed 
by force, we will give instant information of it to the Sircars. 

Article 7. 

We will perform the Rao's service with fidelity. We will accompany 
the Durbar troops when they are acting, and act in concert. 

Article 8. 

On an alarm of plunderers passing with plunder, we will instantly pro- 
ceed and intercept them. 

Article 9. 

We have given a distinct deed to the Durbar, under the guarantee of the 
Sircar, for the payment for ever of an annual jummabundee. The specific 
jummabundee mentioned in it we shall yearly pay. Should any heavenly or 
earthly misfortune happen, in such year the Durbar is to look to our articles. 

Article 10. 
Should we have a necessity for money, and wish to sell our villages, we 
engage to acquaint the Sircars beforehand. 

Article 11. 
Any old fort or castle on our lands we engage to permit to be destroyed, 
and henceforth to build no new work of the kind. 

In the above manner we engage to behave justly, peaceably, and honestly, 
and not to act improperly or infringe on our engagements. 



Signed by Waghela Veesajee and others. 



(Sd.) J. Macmurdo, 
Resident at Bhooj, 



24 Kutch Agency— Kutch— No. V. 



Memorandum. — The above engagement was at the same time subscribed 
to by following additional Chiefs : — ■ 

Weerbhuder Dewajee Samaljee, &e.j of Kuatakoti 

Jhareja KuUiansingjee, of Ausir. 

Jhareja Mimajeej of Wandia. 

Waghela Sadhojee and Vijerajjee^ of Soodram. 

Jhareja Rotlajee, &c., of Kammar. 

Jhareja Jewunjee, of Lakria. 

Waghela Poonjajee, &c.j of PalausWa. 

Jhareja Narunjee, of Chitrore. 

Jhareja Ajeetsingjee and Jussajee, &c., of Veejpasir, 

Jhareja Purtapsingjee, of Koombhardee. 

Waghelas Bharojee, Sadhojee^ and Juruljee, of Juttawaro. 

Hana Soojajee, &e., of Qeerea. 

Waghela Mousingjee, &c., of Bhimasir. 

Jhareja Haldurjee, of Trummoo. 

Jhareja Ubhesingjee and Bhaeeja, &e.j of B/oree and Jessura. 

Waghela Meghrajjee, of Hummeerpoor. 

Waghela Jemaljee and Puehanjee, of Kurrianuggur. 

Waghela Anundsingjee and Khetajee^ of Mowanoo. 

Jhareja Bhimjee and Jugajee, &c., of Ambliaroo. 

Jhareja Nathajee and Mullojee, &c., of Shrunva. 

Jhareja Jugajee and Pragjee Nesajee, of Chiree. 



Pa'el Zamin Deed passed by Mudvee Samla Ajanee, of Ajapoee, in behalf of the Bela 
Waghelas, to Maha Eao Dessttljeb. 

I engage to be Fa'el Zamin for the Waghelas of Bela ; they have passed 
a deed of Articles to Durbar ; I will cause them to be adhered to. It is on 
my responsibility should they be guilty of breaking the agreement into which 
they have entered; or should they act improperly, I individually become 
responsible for the acts in such manner as the Durbar may direct. 

Choitro Viid \st, Sumwut 1875, or the l\th April a. d. 1819. 

(Sd.) Mudvee Samla Ajanee. 



Deed of Aee Zamin. 

We, Weerwudur Dewajee Samatjeeanee, Akherajee, and Kanthurjee 
Pattajeeanee, of Kuntakot, are Arr Zamin to the effect of the above deed. We 
are individually responsible for its efficiency, and will cause it to be adhered to. 
Choitro Vud \st, Sumwut 1875, or the lUh April a. d. 1819. 

The marks X x x of Weerwudur and others. 

(Sd.) J. Macmuedo, 

Resident at Bhooj. 



Kutch Agency— Kutch— Ho. VI. 25 



No. VI. 

Teeatt between the Honoueable English East India Company and Mahaeaj Mieza 
Eao Sheee Dessuljee, his heii-s and successors, concluded by Charles Noeeis, Esq., 
Eesident in EuTCH, on the part of the Honourable Company, and by the Jhaeeja 
Bhayad Vijeeajjbe Peagjee, of Kotoeee, Mokajee, Chtjndaj^eb, Bhaeeajeb, 
Allyajee, Bhanjee, Peagjee, of Mhowa, Kayajee, and Jeymuljee, on the part 
of the Eao, by virtue of full powers from their respective Goveenments. 

Article 1. 

The British Government and the government of Kuteh, thinking it 
expedient that the town and district of Anjar should he transferred to His 
Highness the Rao of Kuteh for a pecuniary equivalent^ the 10th Article in 
the Treaty of Sumwut 1872 (a. d. 1816) is annulled^ and the separate deed 
therein alluded to is declared void. The sum of Ahmedabad Sicca Rupees 
(88,000) eighty-eight thousand a year, is agreed to by both governments as 
the amount which is to be paid by the Kutch government to the Honourable 
Company in return for transfer of the town and district above mentioned to 
His Highness the Rao of Kutch, including, in the Anjar district, the town 
of Lukhapoor, the separate deed of which declared void. 

Aeticle 2. 
The town and district of Anjar will be delivered over to the Kutch 
Government on 2nd Assar Soodh, Sumwut 1879 h.e., corresponding with 
20th June a. d. 1822, and the government of Kutch engages to make good the 
payment of the sum above stipulated every year by two half-yearly payments, 
the first of Rupees (44.,000) forty-four thousand on Pons Soodh 2nd, and the 
second, of Rupees (44,000) forty-four thousand on Assar Soodh 2nd. No dimi- 
nution in the amount of compensation above fixed for the town and district of 
Anjar shall ever take place ; and the government of Kutch agrees that if it 
shall not be paid regularly at the periods above specified, good and satisfactory 
assignments of land in full sovereignty, either the Anjar talook or other 
districts as may suit the Kutch government, shall be made to the British 
Government for the purpose of realizing the amount which may have become 
. due. 

Abticlb 3. 
Since the establishment of the connexion between the two governments, 
the British Brigade has been cantoned at the foot of the hill fort of Bhojea, 
which has remained in the hands of the British. The British Government, 
from an anxiety to restore the fort to His Highness the Rao, has had the 
ground in the neighbourhood of Bhooj examined with the view of removing 
the camp. One spot only has been found suitable for a cantonment ; it is 
situated to the north of the town and belongs to Rajgoor Brahniins and the 
government of Kutch being unable to induce the owners voluntarily to sur- 
render this ground, has expressed a wish that the cantonment may remain 
where it is at present, and the fort continue in the occupation ot the BritisU. 

4 

IV 



26 Kuteh Agency— Kutch— No. VII. 



To this proposal the British Government agrees, and the Kuteh government 
engages never to require the British Government to give up the fort without 
obtaining hj' purchase from the proprietors the ground above mentioned and 
giving it to the British Government, and indemnifying the British Govern- 
ment for any expense which it may have incurred in repairing the fort, which 
expense, however, is not to exceed the sum of Rupees (4<5j000) forty-five 
thousand. 

Bated \st Jeet Soodh, Sumwut 1878, corresponding with %\st May 
1822 A.D. 



(Sd.) C. NoRRis, 



Ratified by the Governor General in Council at Fort William in Bengal, 
this fifth day of July one thousand eight hundred and twenty-two. 

(Sd.) Hastings. 

„ J. Adam. 

„ JoHij. Fendall. 

„ W. B. Bayley. 

JBy His Excellency the Governor General in Council. 

(Sd.) G. SWINTON, 

Secretari/. 



No. VII. 



Tbeaty between the HoNorsABLB East India Company and Sheee Mahabaj Mieza 
Eao Dbsuljeb, his heirs and successors, concluded by Lieutenant-Colonel Henry 
PoTTiNGEE, Resident in Kptch, on the part of the Honoueable Company, and 

JhaEEJAS ChANDABHOY of NaUGBECHA, DoSAJEE of KOTOEEE, PeAGJEE of MOTAEA, 

Naeeonjee of Mhow, Deeda Bhojeajjee, and the Ministee Dewan Luckmidas 
Wullubjee, on the part of His Highness the Eao. 

Whereas the Right Honourable John, Earl of Clare, Governor in Council 
of Bombay, is of opinion that by the Treaties now in force a greater sum is 
required from Kuteh than the resources of that principality can afEord, as a 
proof of which there are now due to the British Government by the Kuteh 
Durbar arrears amounting to 9,75,000 corries, and which the Kuteh government 
is unable not only to liquidate, but even to discharge the annual amount 
stipulated by former Treaties for the pay of the troops and on account of 
Anjar. The two governments have therefore agreed to modify existing Treaties 



Kutoh Agency— Kutch— No. VII. 27 



in the manner written in this engagement, which is dated at Bhooj on this 
20th day of September 1832, being the 11th day of Bhadurwa Vud, 1889 
Sumwut. 

Article 1. 

The 1st and 2nd Articles of the Treaty of the 21st May 1822 are main- 
tained in force only as described in the succeeding Articles of the present 
Treaty, and the contracting parties do now engage as follows : — 



AUTICLE 2. 

The Honourable East India Company's government hereby remits 
(subject to the condition specified in the 4th Article) the equivalent for Anjar, 
viz., 88,000 Ahmedabad Sicca Rupees per annum, fixed by the 1st and 3nd 
Articles of the Treaty of the 21st May 1822, together with all arrears now 
due on that as well as on any other account by the Kuteh Durbar to the 
British Government, or which shall be found due on the settlement of the 
accounts for the past year, that is, the Sumwut 1888, which terminated on 
the 1st day of July last. 

Article 3. 

His Highness the Rao Shree Dessuljee, his heirs and successors, solemnly 
agree that the fu^ds stipulated by the 6th Article of the Treaty of October 
1819 to be appropriated for the pay of the Kuteh subsidiary force, but which 
it is hereby declared are never to exceed the amount of two lakhs of Ahmeda- 
bad Sicca Rupees per annum, shall be hereafter regularly, without fail, and 
under any circumstances whatever, discharged by four (4) quarterly equal 
instalments, viz., on the 15th days of January, April, July, and October of 
each year. 

Article 4. 

The Kuteh government further engages that in the event of the British 
troops in that principality being greatly diminished, and the necessary pay- 
ment on account of them being similarly lessened, so as to reduce it below 
the amount of the above remitted Anjar equivalent, that is 88,000 Ahmeda- 
bad Sicca Rupees per annum, or in the event of the entire removal of the 
troops from Kuteh, His Highness the Rao, his heirs and successors, shall still 
be responsible, in either case, for making to the British Government an annual 
payment amounting on the whole to not less than the above recited Anjar 
equivalent, or Ahmedabad Sicca Rupees 88,000. 



Article 5. 
All existing stipulations and engagements which have^been entered into 
by former Treaties between the Honourable East India Company s govern- 



28 Kutch Ageney—Kutch— No. VIII. 

ment and the Government of Kutch, and which shall not have been altered 
or modified by the present Treaty, are to remain in full force. 

(Sd.) Henky Pottingek, Lieut.-Col., 
Resident in Kutch, 
„ W. C. Bentinck. 

„ E. Barnes. 

„ C. T. Metcalfe. 

„ A. Ross. 

Ratified by the Right Honourable the Governor-General in Council at 
Fort William in Bengal, this twenty-third day of April a. d. 1833. 

(Sd.) W. H. Macnaghten, 

Secretary to the Govt. 



No. VIII. 

Teeatt between the Honoueable Bast India Company and the Gtoveenment of Kutch. 

Whereas by the 4th Article of the Treaty concluded at Bhooj on the 
13th day of October 1819, it was stipulated that a regency should be formed 
with full powers to transact the affairs of the Kutch government until His 
Highness Miiza Rao Shree Dessuljee should have completed his twentieth 
year, and whereas His Highness will not attain the above described age until 
on or about the 3rd day of August 1835, nevertheless the British Govern- 
ment, desirous of affording to His Highness a strong proof of its consider- 
ation and friendship, has consected to a modification of the above stipulation, 
and this Treaty has been this day entered into by Lieutenant Colonel Henry 
Pottinger, Resident in Kutch, &c., on behalf of the Honourable East India 
Company, and by the undersigned Jharejas, &c., on behalf of the Rao of 
Kutch, in virtue of full powers entrusted to them by their respective govern- 
ments. 

Article 1. 
The period for the minority of His Highness the Rao ceasing shall 
be altered from the completion of his twentieth year to Assar Soodh Booj, 
Sumwut 1891, corresponding with the 8th day of July a. d. 1834, on which 
day the functions of the regency shall terminate and His Highness shall be 
placed in charge of the government of his country under the constitutional 
and established advice of his ministers and the members of the Jhareia 
Bhayad. 

Article 2. 
With a view to the welfai'e and prosperity of the State of Kutch, and 
also to relieve His Highness Mirza Rao Shree Dessuljee from all vexation 



Kutoli Agency— Kutch— No. IX. 29 

and annoyance on the subject, the British Government reserves to itself, 
agreeable to the 2nd Article of the Treaty of October 1819, the entire 
maaagement and control, through the Resident in Kutch, of the ex-Rao 
Bharmuljee, and will permit no interference on his part in any act of the 
Kutch government. 

Aeticltj 3. 

All existing engagements between the two States, not modified or altered 
by this Treaty, are to be considered in full force and efficacy. 

Bone at Bhooj on the hth day of July 1834, corresponding with Jest 
Wuddh lUh, Sumwut 1891. 







(Sd.) 


W 


C. Bentinck. 






>} 


F. 


Adam. 






J} 


W 


MOUISON. 






>j 


E. 


Ironside. 


1. 


Jharbja Khangaejbe, 


of Roha. 






2. 


„ Chundeejbe, 
DosAJEE, of Kotoree. 


of Naugei 


cha. 






3. 






4. 
5. 


Pbagjbe, of Mhow. 
SootrnAJBB, of Terah. 








Company's 
Seal. 


6. 


Sahibjee, of Vinjan. 
Pkagjbb, of Mohtalla. 










7. 






8. 


JliYMTJLJBE, of Bharra. 








9. 


Ryahjee, of Mohtara. 








10. 


GooiiJEB, of Sootree. 











(Sd.) H&NRY POTTINGEB, 

Besident in Kutch, 

Ratified by the Right Honourable the Governor General of India in 
Council on the 12th September 1834. 



No. IX. 



Peoclamation issued by the Eao of Ktjtch abolishing the Impoetation of Slates into 

Kutch. 

Be it known to the principal merchants of Mandvee, and every other 
merchant as well as trader in Kutch, whether belonging to it or only trading 
thereto, to all navigators of vessels, to the inhabitants of Kutch generally, that 
if any slaves, Negroes or Abyssinians, shall be brought for sale to any seaport 
in Kutch after the middle of July next, the vessel conveymg them shall be 
confiscated, and its cargo shall become the property of this Government 
Durbar) . No petition for its restoration shall be listened to ; and further, the 



30 Kutch Agency— Kutch—lfo. X. 



offenders shall be brought to condign punishment, whether they belong to 
Kutch or another country. There will be no departure from this resolution. 
A vessel which brings slaves shall be seized, and summary punishment inflicted 
on those who navigate her. 

The British Government have made arrangements to suppress the trade 
in slaves throughout the adjacent countries, and it lias instructed the officers 
commanding its ships to seize and retain all ves.sels bringing slaves. I 
therefore strictly prohibit, after the date before mentioned, any more slaves being 
brought to this country ; let all my subjects discontinue this custom, and take 
heed of this Proclamation, and look to their interests and welfare by attending 
to it. 



No. X. 



Rules for the Exemption from Payment of Duties by Vessels driven by Stbess of 
Weather into any of the Kutch Poets whilst on their voyage between Bombay 
and SiNDH, in Supeesession of those established in the year Sumwut 1897, Magsur 
Soodh 8th, 2nd December A. D. 1840. 

Rule 1. 

Vessels from or belonging to the ports of Bombay, or those under the 
Guikwar government", Joonagurh, Nowanuggur, Bhownuggur, Porebundur, 
Jafferabad, and Mangrol, trading with any ports under the English Govern- 
ment, driven by stress of weather into Mandavee or any other of my ports, 
shall, provided they depart without having landed their cargo, or any portion 
of it, be exempt from payment of duty on the same, with the exception of a 
charge of five comes, which is to be levied as a fee on all vessels under the 
foregoing circumstances. 

Rule 3. 

A vessel driven into Mandavee, &c., under the circumstances above 
detailed, requiring such repairs as will involve the necessity of landing her 
cargo, a time will be fixed under which the repairs must be completed, and 
the cargo re-shipped, when no duty will be charged, provided that during 
that time no attempt be made, either by the tindal, the owners of the boat, 
or their accredited agents, to defraud me of custom duties by the surreptitious 
sale of any portion of the cargo. 

Rule 3. 

A vessel driven into Mandavee, &c., under the foregoing circumstances, 
and being found unseaworthy, her cargo may, within a specific time, be 
transhipped free of duty charges. 

Rule 4. 

Should a boat be driven into Mandavee, &c., at the close of the season, 
and be compelled to lay up for the monsoon, security must, in the first instance. 



Kutoh Agency— Kuteh— No. XI. 31 



be given for the full amount of customs on the whole cargo, when the goods 
may be landed and warehoused at the expense and risk of the owner or tindal 
of the vessel j the original invoice of the cargo, or an authentic copy, shall 
be deposited with the custom authorities; at the opening of the season, the 
goods must be re-shipped on board the vessel which brought them, unless 
she be proved unseaworthy. 

Rule 5. 

Should it be proved that the tindal or owner of a vessel driven into 
Mandavee, &c., attempt to defraud the custom authorities of duty by the sale 
of any portion of the cargo, or should they, without satisfactory reason, fail 
to sail within the period assigned for the completion of the repairs, duty will 
be chargeable on the full value of the cargo ; or should less be re-shipped than 
was originally landed, or any portion of the cargo have been opened, and a 
most satisfactory explanation of the cause for so acting not be given, duty 
will be charged on the whole cargo. 

All perishable or damaged articles may be sold, under the sanction of the 
custom-house authorities, on payment of the usual duty. 

Rule 6. 

Vessels driven into Mandavee, &c., under the circumstances already set 
forth, and strictly observing the rules now laid down, shall be allowed to 
depart on the pa,yment of five correes (5) only ; but the infringement of any 
one of the rules now established, either by the tindal, the owner of the vessel, 
or any one of her accredited agents, shall invoTve the penalty of payment of 
duty on the value of the cargo. 

Previous to punishing the breakers of the law now promulgated, their 
case must be reported to me for consideration, the ofEenders in the mean time 
providing approved security for their appearance to answer any charge that 
may be preferred against them, in default of which they are to be retained in 
confinement. 

The above rules are to be made public, and have effect from the 37th 
October 1851. 

(Sd.) Rao Dessuljeb. 



No. XI. 

EifGAGEMENT executed by the Joonagueh Dukbae, dated 26th May 1873. 

We formerly gave an Agreement to Colonel Long, Pohtical Agent, ou 
the 20th of December 1849, that if any vessel of the British Government or 
of the States of Kattywar were driven into our ports by stress of weather we 
would collect no sea customs from it. 



32 Kutch Agency— Kutch-No. XII. 

At that time the Maharaja of Kutch had not given in an Agreement to 
take no customs from ships from our ports driven by stress of weather into 
the Kutch ports, and therefore we did not make that concession to him. 

But afterwards the Rao Saheb on the 27th of October 1851 gave in 
certain regulations to Government wherein he agreed not to take customs on 
vessels from the Kattywar ports driven into the Kutch ports by stress of 
weather. 

Wherefore we hereby agree that we will in future allow to Kutch vessels 
driven into our ports by stress of weather the same exemption from customs 
as is granted by His Highness the Rao in the abovenamed regulations. 

(Sd.) Jhala Gokulji, 

For JELis Highness the Nawab. 

Similar Agreements executed and signed by ' 

His Highness the Jam Shri Vibbagi of Nowanuggur, dated 28th June 
1873. 

The Joint Administrators of Bhownuggur, dated 13th May 1873. 
Rana Shri Vikmatji of Porebunder, dated 21st May 1873. 

(Sd.) J. B. Peile, 

Acting Political Agent. 



No. XII. 



Eenewed En aAGEMENT entered into by the Jhaebja Chiefs of Kittch, under date the 
23rd March 1840, renouncing Female Infanticide. 

The writing of Jhareja Rahebjeej Chief of Kotara, is this : — In the 
year of Sumwut 1875 (a. d. 1819) there was a Treaty made between the 
Durbar of Kutch and the English government. In the 17th Article of that 
Treaty it was stipulated that we, the Jharejas, would no longer desti-oy our 
female children; and in Sumwut 1891 (a. d. 1835) we renewed our engage- 
ment to the Durbar on this subject. Now the two governments have no 
confidence in the fulfilment of our engagements; therefore we have been 
summoned and required to consider the following arrangement : — 

Article 1. 

An accurate account of all the sons and daughters born in the Bhayad 
shall be rendered yearly to the Durbar according to a set form. 

Aeticle 2. 
Whenever a newly born child is destroyed among the Bhayad, the Chief 
shall give information to the Durbar, within the space of fifteen days, in 



Kuteh Agency— Kuteh— Wo. XII. 



33 



order that the mui-derer may be visited with punishment by fine or otherwise. 
If the Chief conceals any instance of the crimCj or neglects to take such 
measures as are sure to prevent it concealment from himself, and information 
of itfe having been committed reaches the Durbar from another quarter, then 
the Chief himself shall submit to be heavily fined. It therefore behoves the 
Chief to take good precautions and whenever it is ascertained that the wife 
of a Jhareja has been pregnant, and the child is stated to have been born 
prematurely, or to have died naturally, in such case four respectable men shall 
take cognizance of the facts, and their verdict shall be reported to the Durbar 
within fifteen days. 

Article 3. 

The Durbar will keep the amount of all fines inflicted under the 2nd 
Article in a separate fund, out of which assistance will be given to any poor 
man who is marrying his daughter, on a representation of the circumstances 
being made by the Chief. 

Article 4, 

One or two mehtas from the Durbar will go round the country and when 
they arrive in any of the villages, the Chief will cause accurate lists of all 
the sons and daughters to be made out for the information of the two govern- 
ments. 

do hereby agree, in behalf of myself and 



To the above four Articles I 
my posterity, to every generation. 

Bated Bhooj, 23rd March 1840. 



(Sd.) Jhareja Rai-iebjee, 
Of Kotara. 



A similar engagement was on the same day signed by the undermentioned 
Chiefs :— 



J hare; 
J hare 
Jhare; 
J hare; 
Jhare, 
Jhare 
Jhare; 
Jhare; 
Jhare; 
Jhare; 
Jhare 
Jhare; 
Jhare 
Jhare 



a Chandabhaee, of Naugercha. 
a Soomrajee, of Terah. 
a Khangarjee, of Roha. 
a Soomrajee, of Mohtara. 
a Gorjee, of Suturee. 
a Kulian Sing, of Airysir. 
a Humeerjee, of Roturee. 
a Momyajee, of Goojoo. 
a Humeerjee, of Sandan. 
a Lukajee, of Assombeea. 
a Assaryajee, of Nureeya. 
a Jeehajee, of Kheroee. 
a Gaeejee, of Furadee. 
a Nathajee, of Bidra. 



IV 



34 Kutch Agency— Kutch— No. XIII. 



No. XIII. 

TeansIiATIon of an Engagement entered into by Jhaeeja Kengaejee, of Bhoah, on 

the 7th May 1846. 

Jhareja Kengarjeej of Soomree Khoah, writes thus: — Because in 1819 
the British Government made a Treaty with that of His Highness the Rao, 
and in the 1 7th Article it was agreed that infanticide should not be permitted, 
and to this effect I gave a written agreement j again in a. d. 1833-34, on this 
account I gave a written paper to the Durbar j but the two governments 
not having full faith, again, in 1839-40, took from me a fresh writing j and 
now to make enquiries the two Sircars have summoned me to Bhooj, when 
all the above written papers and the written notice sent by Sir J. Malcolm 
in 1829-30 were all read, and regarding the 2nd Article of the Agreement 
of 1839-40, I was questioned, when it appeared that it was not altogether 
fulfilled ; whereas I could not make any excuse, I requested pardon, and 
petitioned that I would take certain measures to see that the following arrange- 
ments were duly carried out, viz : — 

Article 1. 

A skilful midwife, such as shall be approved of by the Durbar writers, 
I will always entertain as a servant, and she will every two months travel 
through all the villages belonging to my clan, and come and inform me of the 
number of women in labour and the number of months, that she and I may 
be able to give an account to the Durbar writer when he comes round. 

Akticlj! 2. 
Whenever a premature birth shall occur, this midwife will inform me of 
it, so that I may keep a correct account of it and of those who are 
in child labour. 

Article 3. 

Thus as is written above in the 1st Article, the account of women in 
child labour being kept, after nine months I will cause inquiry to be made, 
and take great care about it and not neglect it; if after this any neglect 
should be apparent on my part, the two governments may take any measures 
that will satisfy them. 

Article 4. 
I will keep a strict register of all male and female births, with such 
witnesses and explanations of all deaths caused by disease, &c., as will be 
satisfactory to the Durbar Agents. 

Article 5. 

From the form of the births and deaths of children which the Durbar 
sends annually for, the two Sircars observe that more deaths from disease 



Kutch Agency— Kutch— No. XIV. 35 



occur amongst the females than the male children, ahd that sufficient care and 
protection is not afforded to the former, and on this account desire greater 
cautions ; therefore I will take every possible means as above, and by every 
other way endeavour, so that it may be certain the female infants will be 
carefully nourished amongst the brethren of my tribe, so that it will be 
apparent to the two governments. 

Article 6. 

Should any of the wives of my brethren go abroad or into any other 
country, or to the homes of their fathers, and there have female infants and 
put them to death, this will not be on my head. I only answer for what may 
take place in my country. 

Thus having in view as written in the above Articles, together with the 
former engagements, I will be answerable that great care is taken, so that, 
should any difference exist, and the arrangement not be sufficient, then the 
two governments are masters, and shall make what arrangements they choose, 
and such shall be binding on n;ie. 

The above in the name of my forefathers I agree to. 

(Sd.) Jhabeja Kengaejee, 

Of Sooree Khoah. 
Bated 1th May. \^^Q. 

A similar agreement was entered into separately by the undermentioned 
Jharejas :— 

Jhareja Eaibjee, of Kottorah. 
Jhareja Humeerjee, of Sondhow. 
Jhareja Saomrajee, of Teyrah. 
Jhareja Madowjee, of Vunnotee. 
Jhareja Assoreajee, of Nullia. 
Jhareja Gorjee, of Sootree. 
Jhareja Humeerjee, of Kotree. 
Jhareja Soomrajee, of Mothalle. 
Jhareja Sahebjee, of Vinjan. 



No. XIV. 

Engagement executed by the Chief of the Hothee Teibe for the Suppeession of 

Female Infanticide. 

I, Hothee Koonurjee, of Burra Bundra, write that there was a Treaty 
made between the English and Kutch Government in the year Sumwut 1875, 



36 Kuteh Agency— Kuteh— No. XV. 



A.D. 1819, in the 17th Article of which all the Jhareja Bhayad agreed not to 
destroy their female children j in that agreement the whole of the tribes con- 
curred; therefore the Durbar many times has reiterated its orders, but we 
from our foolishness did not agree to this; but now Moonshee Gool Mahomed 
came to our village to make the census, and we would not^ according to the 
custom of the country, allow him to take it. This was on our part a great 
fault ; therefore the Sircar sent on us ten Mohsul sowars, and we went and 
prayed for pardon of our offence from the two Sircars, and agreed, according 
to the agreement of all the Jharejas, to keep our children alive according 
to the four pai-agraphs written underneath : — 

Article 1. 

An accurate account of all the sons and daughters born in the Bhayad 
shall be rendered yearly to the Durbar, according to a set form. 

Article 3. 

"Whenever a newly born child is destroyed among the Bhayad, the Chief 
shall give information to the Durbar, within the space of fifteen days, in order 
that the murderer may be visited with punishment by fine or otherwise. If 
the Chief conceals any instance of the crime, or neglects to take such mea- 
sures as are calculated to prevent its concealment from himself, and inform- 
ation of its having been committed reaches the Durbar from auotlier quarter, 
then the Chief himself shall submit to be heavily fined. It therefore behoves 
the Chief to take good precautions; and whenever it is ascertained that the 
wife of a Jhareja has been pregnant, and the child is stated to have been born 
prematurely, or to have died naturally, in such ease four respectable men shall 
take cognizance of the facts, and their verdict shall be reported to the Durbar 
within fifteen days. 

Article 3. 

The Durbar will keep the amount of all fines inflicted under the 2nd 
Article in a separate fund, out of which assistance will be given to any poor 
man who is marrying his daughter, on a representation of the circumstances 
being made by the Chief. 

Article 4. 
One or two Mehtas from the Durbar will go round the country ; and 
when they arrive in any of the villages, the Chief will cause accurate lists of 
all the sons and daughters to be made out for the information of the two 
governments. 



No. XV. 



Agbebment executed by the Eao of Kutch for the constitution of a Bhayad Couet, dated 

4tli January 1872. 

I. — His Highness the Rao shall keep a list of the persons entitled to the 
guarantee. The list will be subject to the approval of Government, and may 



Kutoh Agency— Kutch— No. XV. 37 

from time to time be amended by the Rao with the sanction of Government. 
The guarantee-holders will be divided into five classes. 

II. — The members of the Jhareja Courtj who shall be four in number, 
will be appointed by the Rao. They will be selected from among the members 
of the Bhayad. His Highness' Dew;in or Deputy Dewan will also be 
appointed a member and will be Ex-officio Presideut of the Court. Three 
including the President shall form a quorum. 

III. — Cases of every kind in which a guarantee-holder is concerned^ or 
to which a Khalsa subject is a party against a resident on a guarantee-holder's 
estate, or which arise between residents on different estates, shall be decided 
by the Court. The Court shall also have jurisdiction in other cases arising 
on the Estates of guarantee-holders subject to the following limitations : — 

1. In criminal matters the original jurisdiction of the Court in 
cases arising in First Class Estates shall be limited to such as involve a 
maximum sentence of seven years' imprisonment. In cases arising in 
Second, Third and Fourth Class Estates to such as involve a maximum 
sentence of two years, three months, and fifteen days' imprisonment respec- 
tively. The Court shall have jurisdiction in all cases arising in Fifth Class 
Estates. 

2. In civil matters the Court shall have no original jurisdiction in 
First Class Estates, and in cases arising in Second, Third and Fourth Class 
Estates its original jurisdiction is limited to cases where the value of the 
disputed property exceeds Korees 10,000, Korees 2,000, and Korees 200 
respectively. 

3. The Penal and Civil Laws for the guidance of the Court and of the 
four classes in the exercise of the above powers shall be the same as those in 
force for the khalsa portion of the Rao's territory. 

IV. — The proceedings of the Court shall be conducted in accordance with 
the rules to be framed by His Highness the Rao subject to the approval of 
Government, these rules shall also contain provisions for Mohsuls of Rao's 
rights and of the Court and for fees. 

V. — An appeal subject to the exception hereinafter mentioned from all 
decisions of guaranteed Zemindars shall lie to the Court, and from all 
decisions of the Court to His Highness the Rao with a further appeal to 
the Government when the party dissatisfied is a guarantee-holder with 
respect to cases involving the possession of land, and his old rights of 
dues. No appeal however shall lie from the decision of holders of First 
Class Estates in cases involving a maximum sentence of two months' impri- 
sonment, or Rupees 200 fine, or of Second Class Estates when the maximum 
sentence shall be one month's imprisonment, or Rupees 100 fine. In civil 
cases no appeal shall lie from decisions of Zemindars of First Class Estates 
where the value of the property in dispute does not exceed Rupees 2,500, or 
Rupees 1,000 iii cases arising in Estates of the Second Class. 

VI. — Boundary disputes wherein a guarantee-holder is a party shall be 
decided by the Court with appeal to the Durbar, and a fui-ther appeal to 



38 Kutch Agency— Kutch— No. XVI. 



Government if the party dissatisfied is a guarantee-holder. But Ijoundary 
cases in which the Durbar is a party, shall be decided by the Court with an 
appeal to Government. 

VII. — When land in a divided village is sold by a guarantee-holder 
possessing any jurisdiction or rights of dues, such iurisdiction or rights of 
dues, whatever they may be, shall pass to the vendee as heretofore. This 
proviso shall also apply to sales in undivided villages on the seller dividing 
his share before the sale is completed. The right of pre-emption shall 
however in all cases be offered to the immediate Teelat of the seller when 
both are in joint possession of the land in question. 

(Sd.) Rao Pragmuljee. 



No. XVI. 

Peoclamation by His Highness the Eao of Kutch, to his Subjects. 



Seal. 



Mahaeaja Dhieaj Mieza Maha Rao Sheee Peagmuljee Bahadooe, to the population 

of Kutch generally. 

To wit — That for the security of those among you who, for the purposes 
of trade, &c., permanently reside in, or come and go to and from, the country 
of Zanzibar, I have, at the suggestion of Government, given notice in a yad 
under date the Kartuk Sood \st, Sumvut 1923, through the Political Agent, to 
the exalted Government, that the claims and disputes with any other persons 
of those of you who permanently reside in, or frequent for the purposes, of 
trade, the ports of Muscat and other places in Africa and Arabia and the 
Persian Gulf, and in other countries where my subjects may reside, should be 
settled by the British Government in the same way as if you were its own 
subjects, consequent on the Treaties concluded with Government. 

You formerly carried on trade in slaves. But this traffic having been 
forbidden by the will of Government, a Proclamation to the effect that if 
any slaves, Negroes or Abyssinians, shall be brought (to Kutch) by any one 
for sale, the vessel conveying them with its cargo will be confiscated, was 
issued by my late father, under date the Maha, vide ^th Sumvut 1892. 
Notwithstanding this, I am now informed through Major Shortt, the 
Political Agent at this place, by the Political Agent at Zanzibar, at the direction 
of Government, that the subjects of Kutch residing at Zanzibar are now engaged 
in the slave trade. From this it appears that you have not yet abandoned this 
trade. It is therefore hereby ordered that if you persist in the traffic in slaves, 
the Government will, by virtue of my aforesaid permission, treating you (who 



Kutch Ageney—Kuteh— Nos. XVII. & XVIII. 39 



reside at Zanzibar) as its own subjects, liberate all slaves from your possession^ 
and will not, however large the number of slaves so liberated, award any com- 
pensation whatever, nor entertain any claim in regard thereto ; and besides, 
the perpetrators will be punished there according to the law there prevailing, 
and you will also be considered as criminals, liable to punishment here (in my 
domain) . Note this well, and take warning. 

Given in His HigJiness's presence this 1 Ztli day of the \st Vaisah Sood, 
Sumvut 19^5 of the Vikram era, corresponding with %Uh d^ril 1869. 



No. XVII. 



Teanslation of a Peoclamation, dated 16th December 1872, issued by His Highness tbe 
Eao of Kutch to his subjects in Zanzibar. 

Maharajah Dhiraj Mirza Maharao Shree Pragmuljee Bahadoor, to all 
the Kutch subjects residing at Zanzibar. To wit, that it has come to our 
knowledge that you carry on at Zanzibar the trade of buying and selling in 
slaves. This is a most horrible thing, and by the desire of the Honorable 
Government to put a stop to this practice, we as well as our revered father 
have before this time issued Proclamations. Notwithstanding these, you have 
not abandoned this horrible trade, which is very bad on your part, "lou are, 
therefore, hereby commanded not to persist in this trade at all events, and if 
you are practising it, to abandon it at once on receipt of this command. He 
who in spite of this shall follow this trade, or in any way abet or assist in the 
same, shall be punished severely by the Honorable British Government, consi- 
dering him to be their own subject, by virtue of the power given them for the 
purpose, and this Durbar will confiscate all his property situated in Kutch. 
Therefore take strict warning. Given in His Highness' presence this Monday, 
the 1st Magsur Vud, Sumbut 1929 of the Vikram era, corresponding with 
16th December 1872. 

A similar Proclamation was issued to his subjects at Muscat. 



No. XVIII. 

Adoption Sunnitd granted to the Rao of Ktttch. 

Her Majesty being desirous that the Governments of the several Princes 
and Chiefs of India who now govern their own territories should be perpe- 
tuated, and that the representation and dignity of their houses should be con- 
tinued, I hereby, in fulfilment of this desire, convey to you the assurance that, 
on failure of natural heirs, the adoption by ourself and future rulers of 
your State of a successor according to Hindoo law and to the customs of 
your race will be recognized and confirmed. 



40 Kutch Agency— Kutch— No. XVIII. 



Be assured that nothing shall disturb the engagement thus made to you 
so long as your house is loyal to the Crown and faithful to the conditions of 
the Treaties, grants, or engagements, which record its obligation to the Bri- 
tish Government. 

Fort William; ■) 

The Wth March 1862. ) (Sd.) Canning. 

Similar Sunnuds were granted to Edur, Nowanuggur, Bhownuggur, 
Bajpeepla, Bansda, Dhurrapore, Kolhapore, and Sawunt Waree. 



* Pahlunpore. 
Radhuupore. 
Thurad. 
Wao. 
Warye. 

Bhabur. 



PAHLUNPORE AGENCY, 

Selections from Records of the Bombay Government, No. XXV., new Series, and 
reports ly the Bombay Government. 

There are eleven* States under the control of the Political Superin- 
tendent of Pahlunpore, of which four, 
Terwara. 
Sooegam. PahlunporCj Radhunpore, Warye, and 

Santalpore. Terwara, are Mahomedan, and the rest 

Kankrej. Hindoo, five of them being Rajpoot. 

The total area of the nine smaller States, 
exclusive of Pahlunpore and Radhunpore, is 3,475 square miles, the population 
193,048, and the gross revenues Rupees 2,71,000 per annum. Pahlunpore 
and Kankrej are tributary to the Gaekwar, and pay, the former Babasahi 
Rupees 50,000, equal to Government Rupees 45,512-8, and the latter Babasahi 
Rupees 6,006-10, equal to Government Rupees 5,592-15-4. Notribute'is paid 
by any of the other States. 

In Radhunpore the Superintendent exercises merely a general supervision 
and only interferes directly in disputes with other States. For the purposes 
of civil and criminal jurisdiction the nine smaller States have lately been 
grouped under .six thanadtirs, who exercise the powers of Magistrates of the 
3rd class, and a limited jurisdiction has also been conferred on such of the 
Chiefs as are fit to exercise it. The Assistants to the Political Superintendent 
dispose of cases beyond the powers of these tribunals with appeal to the 
Political Superintendent. The Chiefs of Pahlunpore and Radhunpore have 
first class jurisdiction, having power to try for capital offences any persons 
except British subjects. 

Interjurisdictional cases between Pahlunpore and the States of Rajpootana 
are decided by the Marwar court of vakeels, to which a delegate is sent by 
the Dewan. 

Pahlunpore. — The Pahlunpore family is Afghan, of the Lohanee tribe. 
The head of the family obtained the title of Dewan from the Emperor Akbar, 
and the provinces of Jhalore, Sachore, Pahlunpore, and Deesafrom Aurungzeb. 
But in 1698 the Rajah of Jodhpore deprived the ruling Dewan of all his 
territories except Pahlunpore and Deesa. 

The connection of the British Government with this State commenced 

in 1809, in which year an Engagement (No. XIX.) was mediated, similar 

to those concluded with the Chiefs of Kattiawar, for the payment of tribute 

to the Gaekwar. ' In 1812 Dewan Feroz Khan had been murdered by a faction 

IV 6 



42 Pahlunpore Agency— PaMunpore. 

of Sindee Jemadars, who seized his son^ Futh Khan, and placed in power 
Shumsher Khan, his uncle, Chief of Deesa, who had been superseded in the 
succession by Feroz Khan in 1794. By the aid of the British Government 
and the Gaekwar, however, Futh Khan, the rightful heir, was established as 
Dewan under the guardianship and management of Shumsher Khan during 
his minority. To prevent the distractions which for some years had rent 
the State, it was determined to unite the interests of the uncle and nephew. 
Through the mediation of the British Government (No. XX.) Shumsher 
Khan, who had no sons, recognized Futh Khan as heir to all his property, and 
both parties agreed that the administration should be carried on by the uncle 
in his nephew's name, and that no foreign mercenaries should be entertained. 

Prom the first the administration of Shumsher Khan was bad. He 
alienated the State revenues, fell in arrears in the payment of his tribute 
to the Gaekwar, and incurred heavy debts; and in 1816 the young Chief 
claimed the interference of the British Government. Shumsher Khan resisted 
the attempt made to deprive him of authority in the administration, but after 
a feeble defence Pahlunpore was taken and Shumsher Khan fled. A new 
Engagement (No. XXI.) was then concluded with Futh Khan on 28th 
November 1817. By this agreement the Dewan engaged to receive an Agent 
from the Gaekwar in the confidence of the British Government, whose sug- 
gestions he was to follow in all matters relating to the government, to sub- 
sidise 250 horse (eventually reduced to 150), to pay punctually his tribute to 
the Gaekwar, and to give no protection to offenders against the British 
Government or the Gaekwar. In 1848 the appointment of Agent from the 
Gaekwar was abolished. From the date of this agreement until 1874 the 
control of the British Government over the finances of Pahlunpore was very 
minute. In that year this supervision was withdrawn and a liquidation 
of the debts of the Dewan having been arranged he was entrusted with the 
management of the revenue. 

In 1822 the Dewan entered into an Engagement (No. XXII.) to' 
prohibit the transport of opium through his territories. 

Futh Khan died in 1854 and was succeeded by his son, Zorawur Khan. 
This Chief rendered good service to the British G overnment in the mutinies 
of 1857. He has been assured (No. XXIII.) that the British Government^ 
will uphold any succession to his State which may be legitimate accordino- 
to Mahomedan law. He is now fifty-two years of age. 



PaMunpore Agency— Radhunpore. 43 

A yearly payment of Rupees 500 is made by the Chief of Danta to 
Pahlunpore. This is granted in lieu of an Engagement (No. XXIV.) 
cancelled by the British Government in 1848, by which the Dewan of 
Pahlunpore agreed to assist the Chief of Danta in suppressing the Koolees 
and Bheels on condition of receiving seven annas in every Rupee of revenue. 

The area of Pahlunpore is 3,150 square miles, the population 215,972 
souls, and the State revenues about Rupees 4,00,000 a year. Pahlunpore 
pays no tribute to the British Government. Besides the subsidized force 
of 150 horse and 100 foot, the Dewan maintains 294 irregular horse and 697 
infantry and police, and could on emergency collect 500 horse and 8,000 foot 
indifferently armed. He has also 16 guns and 5 artillerymen. The Dewan 
receives a salute of. eleven guiis. 

Radhunpore. — Bahadoor Khan, the founder of this family, came from 
Ispahan about 200 years ago. His descendants became Foujdars and farmers 
of revenue under the Mogul Soobahdars of Guzerat, and in 1733 Jo wan 
Murd Khan Babee, the head of the family at that time, received a 
grant of Radhunpore afld other districts. This Chief usurped the -Soobah- 
daree of Guzerat. He was besieged in Ahmedabad by Rughonath Rao, and 
surrendered in 1756 under an agreement, by which he was to hold his districts 
as a jaghire from the Peishwa, ai^d to furnish 300 horse and 500 foot when 
required. A great portion of the family possessions was wrested from his 
sons, Ghazee-ood-Deen Khan and Nizam-ood-Deen Khan, by Damajee Rao 
Gaekwar, but a Sunnud was granted to them for Radhunpore and the other 
districts left in their possession. 

On the death of Nizam-ood-Deen the elder brother, Ghazee-ood-Deen, 
retained undivided authority in the State. On his death in 1813 the State 
was divided between his sons, Sher Khan and Kamal-ood-Deen Khan, the 
former retaining Radhunpore, and the latter the districts of Samee and 
Munjpore. Kamal-ood-Deen died shortly afterwards, and his possessions 
were united with those of his brother. With Sher Khan the first connection 
of the Biitish Government was formed in 1813. In that year an Engage- 
ment (No. XXV.) was concluded through the mediation of the Resident 
at Baroda, by which the Gaekwar was empowered, under the mediation of the 
British Government, to control the relations of Radhunpore with other 
States, but was prohibited from interfering in its internal affairs. Hitherto 
Radhunpore had been virtually independent of the Gaekwar, and the object of 



44 Pahlunpore Agency— Petty States. 

reducing the State to a position of dependence was to prevent the Nawab from 
making alliances with other States which might endanger the peace of Guzerat. 

During the five succeeding years plundering tribes from Sind committed 
serious depredations in Eadhunpore, which induced the Nawab to apply to 
the British Government for aid in expelling them. In consideration of the 
assistance rendered him, the Nawab engaged (No. XXVI.) in 1820 to 
exert himself to the utmost of his ability to suppress marauders and to pay 
in proportion to his means such an amount yearly as the British Government 
might direct. In 1822 the amount of tribute was fixed at Rupees 17,000 
for five years, after which it was to be left to Government to increase the 
amount or not. After three years, however, the tribute was remitted in full, 
as the State was believed to be unable to bear the expense. In 1822 the 
Nawab signed an Agreement (No. XXII.), prohibiting the transport of 
opium through his State. 

Sher Khan died in 1825 and was succeeded by his son, Zorawur Khan, 
who received a Sunnud (No. XXIII.), guaranteeing that on the failure of 
natural heirs Government would uphold any succession to his State that might 
be in accordance with Mahomedan law. 

Zorawur Khan died in October 1874 after a rule of 49 years, and was 
succeeded by his son Bismillah Khan, the present Nawab, who is thirty-six 
years of age. 

An annual payment of Rupees 10,739 is made by the British Govern- 
ment to the Nawab as compensation for the loss of his salt-works at Anwar- 
pore. The State pays no tribute either to the British Government or the 
Gaekwar, but it pays black-mail to the neighbouring Koolee tribes. 

The area of Radhunpore is 1,150 square miles, the population 91,579, and 
the revenue Rupees 5,50,000. The State entertains 248 horse and 362 foot, 
but can command 500 horse and about 5,000 footmen. It has also 2 field 
guns. The Nawab receives a salute of eleven .guns. 

Fetty States. — In 1820 when the Khosas and other marauders were 
expelled from Radhunpore, they were at the same time driven from the other 
petty States which they infested, and an Engagement (No. XXVII.) was 
concluded with these States, by which they became tributary to the British 
Government. In 1821 Government resolved to exact no tribute till the 
revenues of these States had increased one-half, after which one-third of the 



Pahlunpore Agency— Petty States. 



45 



increase was to be taken. But in 1826^ in (consideration of the poverty of 
the petty Chiefs, tribute was remitted altogether, and new Engagements 
(No. XXVIII.) were concluded, binding the Chiefs to subjection to the 
British Government, but without payment of tribute. The Chiefs are also 
bound by an engagement regarding opium similar to that concluded with 
Pahlunpore (No. XXII.). 

In 1827 the Jhareja Chiefs and brotherhood of Chorwar (Santulpore) 
and Charchut signed an Engagement (No. XXIX.) to put down infanti- 
cide. The engagement was renewed (No. XXX.) in 1853, and was also 
signed by the Jharejas of Thurad and Warye. 

The following is a return of the petty States under the Pahlunpore 
Agency : — 



Name of 
State. 



Thurad and 
Morwara. 
Wao 

Sooegam... 



Deodur . . . 

Terwara ,., 

Bhabur ... 

Santulpore 

and 
Charchut. 

Warye . . . 
Kankrej ... 



Name of Chiefs. 



Waghela Khengar Sing . . . 

Bana Oomed Sing 

Chowans Bhooput Sing, . . , 
Kuljee and other share- 
holders. 

Waghelas Mulloojee, 
Chuttur Sing and other 
shareholders. 

Belooch Nuthoo Khan . . . 
and other shareholders. 

K.olee Thakurda Sugramjee 
and other shareholders. 

JarejaTLaihajee of Adeysur 
and Eunmuljee of Sunwa 
and other shareholders. 

Mulliks Oomar Khan 
and Bowajee 



Owned by 
holders. 



many petty 





o 

09 . 


Eevenue. 






Ss. 


'40 


940 


73,000 


28 


380 


30,000 


54 


220 


12,000 


59 


440 


25,000 


46 


125 


12,000 


55 


80 


4,000 


24 
54 


440 


35,000 


, 28 

42 


J330 


40,000 


... 


520 


40,000 



Population. 



MiLY. POECB. 



51,105 
23,081 
10,104 



19,701 

7,338 
5,659 

18,193 

20,096 
37,771 



u 






50 
30 



31 

20 



46 Pahlunpore Agency— Petty States. 

From Kankrej, whicli originally was under the Mahee Kanta Agency, 
and is bound by the same engagements* as the Chiefs in Mahee Kanta, a 
tribute of Rupees 5,592-15-4 is paid to the Gaekwar. 

* See page 71, No. XXXI. 



Pahlunpore Agency— Pahlunpore—Nos. XIX. & XX. 47 



No. XIX. 

Teanslation of an Ageeement. 
To Seeemunt Sheee Sena Khas Khetl Shumsheb Bahadooe wiites— 

Further, it has been agreed to pay to the Sircar the jummabundee of 
talooka Pahlunpore for ten (10) years from the harvest season of the year 
Sumvut 1866 (a.d. 1809-10). The total amount on account of the above 
jummabundee, together with khurajat,* has been fixed at Rupees 50,001 
(fifty thousand and one) per annum, and instalments have been fixed for the 
payment of the sum. I shall accordingly go to Baroda and pay the instal- 
ments from year to year. If I go to Baroda and make payment on due date 
and pay the instalments, it is well and good : if payment is made a few days 
after it has become due, I shall pay interest at the rate of one per cent, per 
mensem. Details are as follows : — 

Rupees 50,001. 

In this way a sum of Rupees fifty thousand and one of the Siccaee 
currency is to be paid in cash by instalments as follows : — 



Rupees 25,000 twenty-five thousand 
to be paid on the 2nd of Chytur 
Soodh. 



Rupees 25,001 twenty-five thousand 
and one to be paid on the 2nd of 
Magh Soodh. 

Total, Rupees 50,001. 

In this way payment shall be made according to instalments from year 
to year. The payment shall be made continuously for ten years. If an 
instalment remains unpaid after its due date, interest shall be paid as written 
above. Besides this, the mohsulee expenses of the mohsul who may come 
from the Sircar shall be paid, and the kasudee expenses of the kossid (or 
messenger) shall also be paid to him. This writing is true. 

Bated lUh of Kartick Soodh, Sumvut 1866 {\2th ISovemher 1809.) 

The signature of Dewan Feekoz Khan 
in the hand-writing of Jbtha. 



No. XX. 



Teanslation of an Ageeement entered into and given to the Goveenment in the under- 
written Aeticles by Shumshee Khan on its being resolved that Putteh'Khan shall 
be united to him, and of one counsel with him, from his willingly adopting Putteh: 
Khan as his son. 

Aetjcle 1. 

Considering Dewan Futteh Khan, the son of Dewan Feroz Khan, as 
my own son, I have adopted him, and constitute him heir to all my possessions, 
unless I have a son born to me, in which case the tuppah of Gola, consisting 
of twenty-two villages, shall be appropriated for his sustenance, and a residence 

* The total deduction in kind taken from the produce of a field before the Government share 
is calculated. 



48 Pahlunpore Agency— Pahlunpore— No. XX. 



allowed him in Pahlunpore. There shall be no deficiency in yielding protection 
and a fitting allowance to all my family, nor shall any molestation be given 
to them, nor any property they may possess touched during their lives. 

Aeticlb 2. 

At this time the Sircar's army has come to Pahlunpore, destroyed the 
influence of the Sindees, and made a permanent arrangement, by which, 
according to the pleasure of the Sircar, Futteh Khan has been placed on the 
guddee, and with my perfect consent he has been proclaimed as my son and 
the Dewan of Pahlunpore. 

Article 3. 

In all affairs of government I shall be uncontrolled, but decisions on 
matter of consequence which relate to the pergunnahs and durbar shall bear 
the seal of Futteh Khan, son of Shumsher Khan, and my signature. Futteh 
Khan shall be the keeper of his own seal, but its impression shall be defective 
without the addition of my signature, and my sign and seal alone shall be 
sufiicient for all papers of little consequence, such as chits on villages, &c. 

Article 4. 

Dungur Mehta, &c., shall act as karbarees under me in the same manner 
as when they originally held the same employ, and they shall in no instance 
keep anything from my knowledge. They shall all obey all my orders regard- 
ing the bettering the condition of the durbar and on other subjects relating to 
the country. They shall manage the affairs of the durbar by one pure line 
of conduct, and they shall give zamin to this effect. For my own conduct I 
shall afford satisfactory security. 

Article 5. 

I agree not to entertain a sebundy of Sindees or other foreigners in 
Pahlunpore, Deesa, or Dhurmera without the knowledge of the Sircar, nor 
shall I unite with any offenders against the g'overnmentj whether Sindees 
or Ciisbuttees, or allow them to remain in these cities. 

Article 6. 

I give my consent to the establishment of 200 men as sebundy according 
to the pleasure of and selected by the Sircar ; they shall be entrusted with 
the guard of the gates, and shall be paid at the rates the Sircar may require. 
I shall take their musters. 

Article 7. 

As my old karbaree who managed for me in Deesa is with me, and as 
employing him here might occasion quarrels with the established karbarees, 
it shall be my duty to provide for him elsewhere. His house being in 
Pahlunpore, his family shall either inhabit it without' molestation from the 
durbar, or he shall remove his family and be permitted to let out the house to 
hire. 

Article 8. 

For the private expenses of Futteh Khan and his family enumerated in 
a separate paper, I shall be responsible if any deviation takes place. 



Pahlunpore Agency— Pahlunpore— No. XX. 



49 



Article 9. 

The relations of Fntteb Khan who are at present with him shall receive 
according to custom what was formerly allowed them for their maintenance, 
and they shall not interfere with me in my duties. In like manner my 
relations shall recei^ie the support they formerly obtained without any increase ; 
because they are my relations^ they also shall not meddle in my duties. 

Aeticlb 10. 

The dufters showing the income and expenditure shall be kept under my 
inspection, but open to the writers of them, and any loan which it may be 
necessary to raise shall be with the knowledge and consent of Futteh Khan. 

Article 11. 

The jummabundee of the Sircar, according to the decennial arrangement, 
shall be, as formerly, in hoondees on Baroda, and there shall be no deviation 
in this respect. 

Article 12. 

I agree, in conjunction with my karbaree Dungur Mehta, to provide for 
the expenses of the army which is now at Pahlunpore according to the 
pleasure of the Sircar. 

Article 13. 

Futteh Khan and myself shall have one opinion on all matters, and shall 
live with cordiality of near relations. 

There shall be no deviation on my part in the above thirteen Articles 
given to the Sircar, and it ought not to be considered that there is any differ- 
ence between Futteh Khan and myself. In future I shall never commit any 
act of sedition or behave ill ; and for the satisfaction of government I shall 
give as my faelzamin securities the Nawab of the Summee and Radhunpore, 
and Sibe Khan Babee Bahadoor and Jemadar Bacha, the son of Dhingam, 
and my arrzamin, Goculpooree, a Mohunt of Rajpore, so that if I in any 
respect deviate from the Articles above written, they shall be responsible. 

Bated Sumhut 1870, Pom Sood \st, corresponding^ with the 2,3rd of 

December 1813. 

Shumsher Khan's signature. 



Seal of the 

Nawab of 

Summee 

Radhunpore, 



IV 



Shumsher 

Khan's 

Seal. 



Seal of 
Bacha Jema- 
dar. 



Signature of Goculpooree. 
7 



50 Pahlunpore Agency— Pahlunpore —No. XX. 



Translation of an Agreement entered into and given to the Government in the under- 
mentioned Articles, willingly executed by Futteh Khan, Dbwan, on its being resolved 
that he shall be united to, and of one counsel with, his father Shumshee Khan. . 

Article 1. 

Shumsher Khan having with his own free-will united our families and 
adopted me as his son, has given a document to that effectj according to which 
I am constituted heir to all his possessions, unless he has a son born to him, 
in which case the tuppah of Gola, consisting of twenty-two villages, shall be 
appropriated for his sustenance, and a residence allowed him in Pahlunpore. 
There shall be no deficiency in yielding protection and a fitting allowance to 
all Shumsher Khan's family, nor shall any of their property be taken away 
during their lives, but they shall be cherished with a consideration equal to my 
own mother and immediate relations. 

Article 3. 
At this time the Sircar's army has come to Pahlunpore, destroyed the 
influence of the Sindees, and made a permanent arrangement, by which I have 
been placed on the guddee ; and through the kindness of the Sircar, and as I 
have been adopted Shumsher Khan's son, I have been proclaimed as such and 
Dewan of Pahlunpore with my full consent; and according to, the pleasure 
and advice of the Sircar I engage to respect smd be of one counsel with my 
parent. 

Article 3. 
In all affairs of government Shumsher Khan shall be uncontrolled, but 
decision on matters of consequence which relate to the durbar shall bear my 
seal, which remains in my possession, and the signature of my parent Shum- 
sher Khan, without which I shall not attach my seal. Shumsher Khan's 
sign and seal only on papers of small import, and such as chits on villages, 
&c., shall be valid. 

Article 4. 
Dungur Mehta, fee, shall act as karbarees under my parent Shumsher 
Khan in the same manner as when they originally held the same employ, and 
shall in no instance keep anything from his knowledge. They shall obey all 
his orders respecting the improvement of the condition of the durbar and on 
other subjects relating to the country. They shall manage the affairs of the 
durbar by one upright line of conduct, and they shall give zamin to this 
effect. For my own conduct I shall afford satisfactory security. 

Article 5. 
I agree not to entertain a sebundy of Sindees or other foreigners in 
Pahlunpore, Deesa, or Dhurmera without the knowledge of the Sircar, nor 
shall I unite with any offenders against the government, whether Sindees or 
Cusbuttees, nor allow them to remain in these cities. 



Pahlunpore Agency— Pahlunpore— No. XX. 51 



Akticle 6. 

I give my consent to the establishment of 200 men, or sebundies, accord- 
ing to the pleasure of the Sircar ; they shall be entrusted with the guard of the 
gates, and shall be paid at the rates the Sircar may require. My parent 
Shumsher Khan shall take the musters. 

Article 7. 

As my parent's old karbaree is with him, and as the employing him here 
might occasion quarrels with the established karbarees, he shall be stationed 
in some other place. His house being in Pahlunpore, his family shall either 
inhabit it without molestation from the durbar, or he shall remove his family 
and be permitted to let out his house to hire. 

Article 8. 

I am contented with the sum allowed for my private expenses and that 
of my family enumerated in a separate paper given in. 

Article 9, 

My relatives shall enjoy what was formerly allowed them, and they shall 
not interfere in the arrangements of my country. 



Article 10. 

The dufters showing the income and expenditure shall be kept under 
inspection of my parent, but open to the writers of them, and any loan which 
it may be necessary to obtain shall be raised by my parent with my knowledge. 

Article 11. 

The jummabundee of the Sircar, according to the decennial arrangement, 
shall be paid, as formerly, in hoondees on Baroda, and there shall be. no devi- 
ation in this respect. 

Article 12. 

Shumsher Khan and my karbaree Dungur Mehta shall provide for the 
expenses of the army now at Pahlunpore according to the pleasure of the 
Sircar. 

Article 13. 

■ Shumsher Khan, my parent, and myself shall be of one counsel on all 
matters, and live with the cordiality of near relations. 

There shall be no deviation on my part in the above thirteen Articles ; 
I shall not act contrary to them in a seditious manner. For the satisfaction 
of government, I give as my faelzamin Meer Kamal-ood-deen Hussen Khan 



52 



Pahlunpore Agency— Pahlunpore— No. XXI. 



Bahadoor and Yara Jemadar, and for my arrzamin Goculpooree, a Mohunt of 
Rajpore, so that if in any respect deviated from the Articles above written, 
they shall be responsible. 

Baled Sawunt 1870, Tons Soodh \st, corresponding with the Z3rd Decem- 
ier 1813. 



Signature of Futteh Khan. 



Seal of 
Futteh Khan. 



Seal of Meer 

Kamal-ood- 

Deen Hussen 

Khan. 



Seal of 
Yara Jema- 
dar. 



Signature of Goculpoorbe. 



Shumshee Khan's signature. 

I, Shumsher Khan, Dewan, son of Osman Khan, hereby adopt to be my 
son with perfect good will and pleasure Futteh Khan, Dewan, son of Dewan 
Feroz Khan. I therefore constitute him' to be heir to all my possessions, 
unless it may please Heaven to grant me a son, in which case the pergunnah 
of Gola, consisting of twenty-two villages, shall be assigned (or his suste- 
nance, and permission granted him to spend his life in Pahlunpore. All my 
relations shall be free from molestation, and no property they may possess 
shall be taken from them during their lives, and they shall be treated with 
respect and consideration. 

Dated Sumbut 1870, Pom Soodh 1st, corresponding with the 2f>rd Decern- 
ber 1813. 

These engagements were approved and confirmed by the Governor Gene- 
ral in Council on 18th February 1814. 



No. XXI. 

Teanslation of Ageeembnt entered into by Futteh Khan, Dewan of Pahlunpoeb 
and Dbesa, of his own free-will, for the better Government and Security of the above 
mentioned Peincipalitibs, signed and delivered to Captain Miles, Political Agent, 
on the part of the Beitish Govbenment, at Pahlunpoee, on the 28th November 
1817. 

Preamhle.—Tlha.i to place the territory depending on Pahlunpore and 
Deesa in security from internal and external dissensions and violence, to 



Pahlunpore Agency— Pahlunpore— Wo. XXI. 53 



obviate the trouble so often occasioned to the British and Guikwar Govern- 
ments from the bad administration of the affairs of this petty StatCj and 
with a view to the improvement of the country, the following Articles of 
Agreement are entered and hereby confirmed : — 

Article 1. 

The British and Guikwar Governments having been pleased to seat me 
on the guddee of my father, and establish my authority over Pahlunpore and 
Deesa, it is my desire to the end that this State, which is in a ruinous con- 
dition, may be better governed, its security and tranquillity ensured, and a 
provtsion made for the discharge of arrears and debts in which from bad 
management it has been involved, to receive the aid and advice of a respect- 
able man in quality of Agent on the part of the Guikwar government. 

He shall have full access to my revenue accounts, receipts, and expen- 
diture, and I engage to follow his suggestions in all arrangements whatever 
relative to government. It is indispensable that this Agent be such as shall 
possess the confidence of the British Government; • and as his situation 
demands he should be disinterested, his salary must be liberal. 

Article 2. 

I also agree to subsidise 250 horse with a Sirdar to command them ; the 
pay of the horse to be 30 Rupees each per mensem, and the Sirdar shall 
receive Rupees 600 per mensem. 

I require these troops to defend my country against enemies of every 
description, and to preserve it in peace and order. They are to be good horse,"* 
and always ready to act in a body against the refractory Shumsher Khan and 
his adherents, and in fact for all purposes. To secure the tranquillity of the 
country, they will not be employed without the concurrence of the Guikwar 
Agent, and are not to be sent on revenue details without the orders of gov- 
ernment; when their service is not otherwise required, they are to be stationed 
near me for my personal protection. 

Article 3. 
The gate called Bahadoor Guz is to remain in charge of Sircar troops ; 
100 good infantry to be stationed there, and their rate of pay Rupees 10 
monthly each. Jemadar included. 

Article 4. 
The horse and infantry, their Commander, and the Agent, to be paid 
monthly without deduction, and the banker who pays them shall have terri- 
tory assigned to him for the discharge of their salaries. 

Article 5. 
The Sircar dues (Rupees 50,000) per annum shall henceforward be paid 
punctually every year at Baroda. The arrears. Rupees 75,000, shall be dis- 



54 Pahlunpore Agency— Pahlunpore- If o. XXI. 



charged in the course of the next year ; but in consideration that the country 
has suffered much from want of rain, the exactions of Shumsher Khan and 
ravages of the Koolees, with the constant movement of troops through it 
lately, I hope government will be indulgent in their expectations and claims 
at least for the present. 

Article 6. 

From the impoverished condition of the country and other claims in the 
Pahlunpore State, the sums due to the merchant of Shidpore cannot at present 
be discharged, but in the course of the next year some arrangement in con- 
cert with the Guikwar Agent shall be made for the gradual payment. 0. 

Article 7. 
A misunderstanding having arisen between me and Shumsher Khan in 
consequence of his violation of the agreement made with Captain Carnae, 
Resident at Baroda, in 1870 or a.d. 1813, I retired to Shidpore and com- 
plained to the Sircar. The forces of the two Sircars in consequence marched 
to this quarter, and Pahlunpore was taken, and I have been reseated on the 
guddee. I therefore consent to pay the expenses of the troops of both Sircars 
with the usual allowance for killed, wounded, loss of horses, &c., according to 
the orders of government. 

Article 8. 
Shumsher Khan is an offender and disobedient to the Sircar : I engao-e, 
therefore, not to have any communication with him or his adherents ; but 
should Shumsher Khan submit himself, and the government be pleased to 
grant him any allowances, I will pay it agreeable to their commands. 

Article 9. 

I engage not to give protection to any offenders against either the British 
or Guikwar Government, nor to allow them to remain in any part of my 
territory. 

The whole of these Articles, nine in number, are delivered in by me to 
government, and I engage to execute them punctually and without diminu- 
tion or difference. I shall act in all matters in strict conformity and obedi- 
ence to the orders of the Sircar, and I bind myself not to commit any insub- 
ordinate act, nor cause any disturbance. To this effect I give as my security 
to the Nawab of Summee and Radhunpore Sher Khan Babee and Mohunt of 
Rajpore, Goculpooree. 

Dated Sumvut 1874!, Karlich Fwd Uh, \%th Mohurrum, Hegira 1233 
corresponding with the '^%th November 1817. 



Seal of Futteh 
Khan. 



Pahlunpore Agency— Pahlunpore—Nos. XXII. & XXIII. 55 

No. XXII. 

Engagement entered into in September 1822 by Putteh Khan, Dew an of Pahlunpoee 
and Dbesa, for prohibiting tbe Teansit of Opium through his Teeeitoet. 

The orders of the Sircar being that no opium shall be allowed to pass 
through the country subject to their control, I, Futteh Khan, do hereby 
engage to the Sircar that no opium shall be allowed to pass the limits of my 
district. 

A public notification has been already issued to my nakadars to that effect, 
but I now repeat my determination to use every exertion to put an entire stop 
to the transport of opium through my talooka ; and because merchants and 
others may conceal opium among other commodities, all packages shall be 
strictly examined previous to their being permitted to pass, and should any 
opium be found in them, it shall be immediately confiscated. In this matter 
I will not fail. 

I beg the favor that the Sircar may be pleased to direct the Mehta 
stationed at this place to give his aid in the detection and prevention of the 
transit of opium. 

(Sd.) Futteh Khan. 



This engagement was signed by the Chiefs of Radhunpore, Wao, 
Sooegam, Thurad, Morwara, Warye, Chorwar, Charehut, Tei-wara, Deodur, 
Bhabur, and Beinup, and by the Chief of Danta now under the Mahee Kanta 
Agency. 



No. XXIII. 

Adoption Sunnud granted to the Nawab of PAHLrNPOEE. 

Her Majesty being desirous that the governments of the several Princes 
and Chiefs of India who now govern their own territories should be per- 
petuated, and that the representation and dignity of their houses should be 
continued, I hereby, in fulfilment of this desire, convey to you the assurance 
that, on failure of natural heirs, any succession to the government of your 
State which may be legitimate according to Mahomedan law will be upheld. 

Be assured that nothing shall disturb the engagement thus made to you 
so long as your house is loyal to the Crown and faithful to the conditions of 
the Treaties, grants, or engagements which record its obligations to the 
British Government. 

Daied im MarcA 186Z. (Sd.) Canning. 



The same to the Chiefs of Radhunpore^ Joonagurh, Cambay, and Sucheen. 



56 



Pahlunpore Agency— Pahlunpore— Wo. XXIV. 



No. XXIV. 

Teanslation of an Ageeement entered into between the Dewan of Pahlitnpoee and the 
Eana of Danta, 27th July 1819, Sumvut 1876, Sravun Soodh 5th. 

Thetalookaof Danta being much harassed and injured by the depreda- 
tion of Koolees, &c., and nearly depopulated from their incursions, in order 
that security and tranquillity may be re-established by the interference and 
protection of Pahlunpore, I, Rana Juggut Sing, of my own free-will, do 
make over to Futteh Khan, Dewan, &c., by this agreement a share of the 
talooka of Danta agreeable to the following conditions :— 

Article 1. 

I give a share of seven annas in the Rupee to Pahlunpoi'e from all towns 
and villages inhabited or deserted ; those of my brethren, Putbavuts, Rajsoke, 
&e., and of all descriptions of taxes and every kind of revenue. The remain- 
ing nine annas to be my share. 

Aeticle 2. 
I have pledged four towns, and the sums due on them are to be paid by 
me. When the accounts of the creditors are settled, and the towns freed, 
your share of seven annas will be allowed. 

Article 3. 

The Guikwar tribute (from Danta) shall be punctually paid by me 
through you every year, commencing Sumvut 1876. The amount now due 
on this head shall be paid by four instalments, from the year 1876 to the end 
of 1879, through you; but if this agreement should not be approved by 
the Guikwar government, I will arrange the payment agreeable to their 
directions. 

Article 4. 
In the profits or revenue of the Hindee temple at Ambajee the Pahlunpore 
State has no share, neither has it any in the vurkhasuns of the temple. 

Article 5. 

Eight wells and the land depending on them, which belong to my family, 
are exempted from any share ; they are as follows ; 



In Danta 
Nowawass 
Great Bhinmal 
Thana 
Ruttunpore 
Anodra 
Koondul 



1 

2 



Well. 

Wells. 

Well. 



Fahlunpore Agency— Pahlunpore— No. XXIV. 57 

Aeticle 6. 

Of the four towns in the possession of my brother Nahar Sing that of 
Poojpore is exempted from any share. 

Aeticle 7. 
If any of my brethren or Puthavuts have possession of land or towns 
to which they have no just claim^ on examination they shall be restored to 
me. 

Aeticle 8. 
I will pay every kind of vole (a kind of tribute paid to Koolees) which 
has been regularly established to the present day, but no other hereafter. 

Aeticle 9. 
Whatever charitable donations are in existence in my State shall be 
continued and preserved, but none new shall be given except with your 
consent. 

Aeticle 10. 
Whatever work is done by the ryots of my pergunnah for me shall be 
done, for your vakeel at Danta. 

Aeticle 11. 
My authority shall remain in my talooka, but in all cases on public 
matters I shall consult your vakeel, and we will act in accordance. He shall 
be consulted in all quarrels, disturbances, &c. 

In this manner eleven Articles have been agreed to and subscribed. They 
are to be in force as long as tbe interests of the Honorable Company Bahadoor 
and the Guikwar government continue in the State of Pahlunpore. 

I will abide by the above, and in no way be the cause of disorder or 
disturbance. 

The securities for the performance of this contract are Megraj Bharote, 
Valadi Davi Sing of Kodrah, and Vakta Bharote of Chundesur. 



Seal of Jug- 
gut Sing, 
Jlana of 
Danta. 



Tahlnnpore, Uh August 1819. 

Confirmed by the Governor General in Council on 22nd January 1820. 
IV ^ 



58 Pahlunpore Agency— Radhunpore— Wo. XXV. 

No. XXV. 

Aeticles of Agebbment concluded between the Guikwae Govbbnment and Shee Khan 
Babbe Bahadoob, Nawab of SuMMEE and Eadhtjnpoeb, by StrccAEAM Mahadeo, 
vested with powers for that purpose from His Highness Anund Rao Guikwae Sena 
Khas Khbtl Shumshee Bahadooe, and under the advice of Captain James 
EiVETT Caenac, Ebsident at Baeoda. 

Article 1. 

Perpetual friendship shall be maintained between the Guikwar govern- 
ment and Sher Khan Babee Bahadoor, Nawab of Summee and Radhunpore, 
his heirs and successors. 

Aeticle 2. 

His Excellency the Nawab, his heirs and successors, engage to ac- 
knowledge the control of the Guikwar State under the mediation of the 
Honorable Company's government in all external relations, and that he will 
have no communication of any description whatever with foreign powers, 
except with the knowledge and sanction of the Guikwar government. 

Aeticle 3. 

The Guikwar government shall never interfere in the internal concerns 
of the Radhunpore State ; but in consideration of His Excellency the Nawab 
Lave recognised the supremacy of the Guikwar State, he (Nawab) consents to 
make an annual acknowledgment by presenting a horse and clothes through 
the Company's authority at the Guikwar capital. 

Article 4. 

When an enemy invades the territories of Radhunpore, the Guikwar 
government engages, by the advice of the Honourable Company's government, 
to assist the Nawab with its forces in defending his dominions. It is, how- 
ever, to be clearly understood that the Guikwar government is not bound to, 
assist the Nawab in the regulation of his internal government, but only against 
external attacks ; on such occasions the Nawab engages to reimburse the 
Guikwar for the expenses which may be incurred by the equipment of its 
forces, which on no other account will enter the limits of the Radhunpore 
State. 

Bated Camp near Pahlunpore, the 29,nd day of Zilhej, 1228 Kegira, corre- 
sponding with the sixteenth day of December in the year of our Lord one thousand 
eight hundred and thirteen. 



Seal of Sher 
Khan Babee. 



Approved and confirmed by the Governor General in Council on 28th 
January 1814. 



Pahlunpore Agency— Radhunpore— No. XXVI. 69 



No. XXVI. 

Teanslation of an Ageeement entered into by the Nawab of Radhunpoee, Shee 
Khan Babee Bahadooe, witli the Honoukable Compant on the 24th Eamzan 
1235 Hegira, or the 6th July 1820. 

That for a long time tlie depredations of the Khosas in my dependencies, 
the pergunnahs of Eadhunpore, Summee, &e., have been greatj and from that 
cause the depopulation and injury to them extensive ; and as it was not in my 
power to restrain or expel the Khosas I wrote describing my situation to the 
British Government. 

The troops of that government have in consequence been sent to my 
assistance, and have punished and expelled the Khosas ; and as from this 
measure the safety and prosperity of my pergunnahs and people will be 
secured, I therefore agree of my own free-will to the following Articles : — 

Article 1. 

I engage not to permit robbers or enemies of the government to remain 
in my dependencies, nor will I allow any Rajpoots or Koolees to remain in 
my districts and molest or plunder the territories of the Honourable Company 
of His Highness the Guikwar, or those of any other State, nor will I main- 
tain any sort of connexion with the Khosas. 

Article 2. 

In order to promote the chastisement of the Khosas or other robbers, 
every intelligence of them shall be communicated to the troops of the Sircar 
wherever they be stationed, and no exertion equal to my ability in their 
punishment shall be. wanting, and on every occasion whatever force of foot oi 
horse I have shall accompany the troops of the government. 

Article 3. 

As the British troops came here in consequence of my letters and com- 
plaints and have expelled the Khosas, and as my districts and ryots will derive 
great advantages from their exertions, it becomes incumbent on me, as in 
these arrangements the British Government has expended and will have to 
expend considerable sums of money, that I should aid, in proportion to my 
means, in discharging this expense. I therefore agree to pay an amount yearly 
in proportion to my means, and as the government may direct. 

The above three Articles should be duly executed and observed in all 
respects. 



The Seal of 

the Nawab 

of Radhun- 

pore. 



(Sd.) Wm. Miles, Captain, 

and Agent, 



60 I»ahlunpore Agency— Petty States— No. XXVII. 



No. XXVII. 

Ageeement and Sectteitt entered into by the Town and Chiefs of Teewaea and its 
Dependencies with the Agent of the Beitish Goveenment, Assar Vud 3rd, or 
28th July 1820. 

The troops and villages depending- on Terwara having been depopulated, 
and we (the Chiefs) reduced to great distress, in order to obtain the protection 
of Government that they may be again re-peopled, and that we may be placed 
in comfort and security, we Buloache Khan, Vnludi Hussun Khan, Ayum 
Khan, Vuludi Kumal Khan, Roria Aja, Vuludi Roadan, Roria Agra, Vuludi 
Dhunrajjee, Roria Bechur, Vuludi Dewan Juggote Asun, &c., the whole of 
the inhabitants of Terwara, of our own free-will, agree to the following 
Articles :— 

Aeticle 1. 
We (the above named) and our brethren and the Koolees of our depend- 
encies all included engage not to plunder or rob in the territories of the 
Honourable Company, nor in any other State or pergunnah, nor to be in any 
wise the cause of robbery or plunder. 

Article 2. 
We engage not to allow the Khosas or any other robbers or enemies 
of the Sircar to remain in Terwara, nor the villages depending on it, nor will 
we maintain any sort of connexion with them, nor send intelligence to them, 
but aid in their discomfiture or punishment to the utmost of our ability, and 
we also engage to forward intelligence of the Khosas to the detachment of 
the Sircar wherever they may be statioued, and 'should it be necessary will 
accompany them. 

Article 3. 

The troops of the Sircar have expelled the Khosas, and have restored this 

country to order, and in effecting these measures great expense has been and 

will be incurred by the British Government : we therefore willingly agree to 

pay a sum yearly consistent with our ability, or as the government may direct. 

In this manner three Articles have been agreed to by us, and we engage 
to abide by them. 

Signed by the Chiefs of Terwara. 
Perpetual security— Gudvi Veerum Vuludi Godur, 

of Pardir. 



Precisely similar engagements were signed by the Chiefs and brotherhood 
olihurad, Warye, Deodur, Wao, Chorwar, Sooegam, Charchut, andBhabur. 



PahlunporeAgeney— Petty States -Wo. XXVIII. 61 



No. XXVIII. 

Tbanslation of an Agebement with the Beitish Goveenment entered into by the 
Thakook of Thubad, "Waghela Kabbm Sing, on the 23r(i August 1826. 

Whereas in the hope of protection from the injuries inflicted on our 
district by the Khosas, Koolees, and others, and of advancing the prosperity 
of our pergunnahs, a bond of agreement with the British Government was 
executed by us, dated 15th Magsud, Sumvut 1878, in the 3rd paragraph of 
which we stipulated to pay to tfie extent of our means our proportion of the 
expenses incurred in preventing the inroads of the , Khosas, or any other 
marauders, and to pay our quota yearly, in conformity to which engagement 
we have until now guided ourselves by the instructions of the British 
Government; but now that the British Government in its great goodness is 
pleased to cancel the above obligation on our part to pay such necessary 
expenses incurred for our benefit, we are deeply gratified for tlie same, and 
bind ourselves for the future by the following engagements : — 

Article 1. 
We promise to conform ourselves in every respect to our former agree- 
ment with the British Government, with the exception of the 3rd paragraph 
respecting our payments therein stipulated to be by us paid, and to conduct 
oiu-selves as faithful dependants on the British Government. 

Aeticlb 2. 
The Koolees, Tlajpoots, or armed men of other districts, who may come 
peaceably, and with the intention of residing quietly in our talookas, shall 
not be licensed to remain without their so coming being communicated to the 
British Government ; and in ease security for their good conduct, and bail for 
their appearance when called for, should be required by the British Govern- 
ment, it shall be demanded from them, nor shall they in such case be allowed 
to remain without consenting thereto. 

Akticle 3. 
The ancient obligation existing previous to the abovementioned Treaty 
between us and the British Government, and the Baroda Government, shall 
remain in full force as heretofore ; we will in every respect guide ourselves 
in conformity thereto. « 

Article 4. 

We will in no respect permit robbers or disturbers of the public peace to 
find shelter in our districts, or any dependencies of ours, and when claimed by 
either the British or Baroda Government we will deliver them up if they fall 

into our power. 

Article 5. 

Whenever the British forces proceed for the suppression of robbers, 
bandits, or Khosas, we will prepare all the means in our power of horse and 
foot in aid of the British armament, and send the ablest of our people with 
them as becomes obedient dependants on the British Government, and the 
person in charge of our contingent shall be placed under the authority of the 
Commandant of the British forces. 



62 Pahlunpore Agency— Petty States— No. XXIX. 



Article 6. 

The talookdars or petty Chieftains shall on no account wage private wars 
or disturb the public peace by mutual discords ; in case of such quarrels the 
same shall be communicated to the British Governmentj and the decision of 
its authority to be final. 

Article 7. 

We will not avail ourselves of the wealyiess or poverty of any village 
landholders to extort Girass, or any other rights and when any village offers 
to bind itself to dependancy or tribute we promise not to accede to such 
arrangement without the knowledge and approval of government. 

Article 8. 

The KooleeSj Eajpoots, and others, in fact any inhabitants of our villages 
shall in no respect be permitted to commit any irregularities in the districts 
of the British or Baroda Government, or any other dependencies, and we are 
responsible for their misdemeanours ; such are the eight Articles of our agree- 
ment, and we will act in conformity thereto; and if we are ever found depart- 
ing from these engagements, we are answerable to make good the claims 
instituted, and pay such fine as shall be ordered by government, submitting 
ourselves to its decision. 

Signed ly the Chiefs. 



Precisely similar engagements were signed by the Chiefs of Wao, Warye, 
Deodur, Chorwar, Sooegam, Charchut, Terwara, and Bhabur. 



No. XXIX. 



Teanslation of an Agekement entered into by the Jhaeejas of Santtjlpoee for the 
Stjppeession of Infanticide, dated Cho^tro Soodh 2nd, Sumv.ut 1883, 3rd March 
1827. 

It being reported that the murder of female children is still continued 
among the Jharejas of Santulpore and Charchut, and as this custom is wicked, 
unnatural, and forbidden in the Hindu shasters, and as it is the anxious desire 
of the British Government that a custom so degrading and revolting to hu- 
manity should be suppressed, and that arrangements should be made to restrain 
the Jhareja brethren from the commission of this crime in future, also that 
satisfactory assurances should be given to that effect, we, Kullian Sing, Maun 
Sing, Bowajee and Wukut Sing, the sons of Moolwajee, and Nathojee, the 
son of Hujjajee, &c., with the whole of our brethren, hereby declare that 
since Sumvut 1875, a.c. 1818, when Captain McMurdo made arrangements 
for the suppression of child murder at BJaooj, no one has destroyed his female 



Pahlunpore Agency— Petty States— No. XXX. 63 



offspring in our talooka ; that fifteen daughters of our family are now living, 
and we with true hearts engage to ensure the observance of this contract, and 
that no one, including all our brethren, shall again commit this crime in our 
talooka. We engage also when any daughters are born to us to communicate 
the same to the Karkoon at Santulpore for the information of government, 
and in order that the births be registered.^ If any one among our brethren 
should violate this contract by the murder of his daughter or daughters in 
our talooka, that man shall be considered a criminal, and we engage to make 
government acquainted with the fact and his name, and if we do not, we have 
violated our engagements to government and are offenders. 



A precisely similar engagement was made on 9fch June 1837 with the 
Jharejas oi Charchut- 

No. XXX. 

Ageeement entered into ty the Jhaeeja Chiefs of Santtjlpoee and Chaechttt with 
MAjok J. R. Kelly, Political StrPBEisfTENDENT of Pahlunpoee, for the Strp- 
PEBssioK of the Ceime of Female Infanticide within their districts, dated the 18th 
June and 15th August 1853. 

The Honourable the Court of Directors having remarked that since the 
year 1846 the females of the Jhareja tribe under twenty years of age con- 
tinue to be much less in number than those of the male sex under that age, 
and required information on this subject ; and we having been requested by 
you to enter into an engagement for the purpose of saving our female children, 
similar to the engagement entered into by the Jam of Nowanuggur on the 
25th of February 18^2; we write to say that we well know that it is a great 
sin to kill an infant, and that the murderer thereof will go to the deepest 
hell, for so it is written in the shaster : this we know. Moreover, the Sircar 
has sent us books on the subject of infanticide, in which there are many 
quotations from the shaster to the effect that there is no sin equal to killing 
a female infant. No one, therefore, should be guilty of this sin, but should 
save his infant daughter : this is true religion, and we therefore willingly agree 
to the following arrangeraents for ^e preservation of our infant daughters, 
which are to be binding on us for ever, viz. — 

AliTICLB 1. 

Every Jhareja living in Santulpore and Charchut to whom a daughter 
may be born shall immediately give information to the Karkoon belonging 
to his district, who will enter the child in the list kept by him, from which 
the yearly returns are framed. The number of births which liave occurred 
during the year will with ease be ascertained by these means. 

Aeticle 3. 
In the event of any Jhareja's daughter dying, information is to be given 
to the Karkoon in charge of the district, who will make every proper enquiry 
into the cause of the death and enter the canse of death in the list. 



64 Pahlunpore Agency— Petty States— No. XXX. 

Article 3. 

Should any female infant of tender age dle^ its body is to be shown to 
four of the most respectable people of the village^ but of different castes, and 
the cause of death must be ascertained as far as possible, and stated in the 
proceedings of the inquest, which must be sent to the government Karkoon, 
after which the body may be buried : without this precaution the body must 
not be buried. No Jharejas are to be allowed to assemble on the punchayet. 

AuTictB 4. 
Should any Jhareja's infant daughter fall ill information must be given 
to the government district Karkoon, and the cause of the illness mentioned to 
the Karkoon, that it may be noted by him in his list. 

Article 5. 

In the event of any female infant dying, and being buried without 
acquainting the government Karkoon and assembling a punchayet to ascertain 
the cause of its death, then the party guilty of the infringement of this 
agreement shall submit to such punishment as government may decide. 

Article 6. 
As above written we will abide, and make no dispute hereon. Whoever 
shall offend and plead ignorance of the above engagement as an excuse to 
escape punishment, he must not be listened to, as all have been made well 
acquainted with the contents of this engagement. 

Article 7. 
In the event of the government Karkoon being engaged in other busi- 
ness elsewhere and unable to attend, then the Chief of the horsemen on the 
thanna will be consulted, and every thing arranged through him. 

In this way we have, of our free-will and consent, and being in possession 
of all our faculties, entered into the above engagement, and we have given, as 
perpetual security for the due fulfilment of the above writing, the undermen- 
tioned, viz., Barote Puttoo Sut Meta wulud Jussa, Swamees Ruttonghur, 
Sut Maughur, Tejghur wulud MuUooghur, Grudvee Hurree Sing Sut Amra 
wulud Veerma, Brahmins Pachun wulud Kana, Gora wulud Kana, Gudvee 
Poonja Sut, Rabeer wulud Davaet, Brahijjin Nanjee wulud Mugga, Purmar 
Runmall wulud Kesserjee, Waghela Veerum wulud Mala, Brahmin Gungarara 
wulud Roora, Brahmin Bhakur wulud Jewna, Brahmin Jetta wulud Dana, 
Swamee Gungaghur wulud Maughur, and Kapree Samut wulud Ram Sing. 

Signed hy IbS persons. 
We do hereby state that we shall abide, and cause the Jharejas to abide 
also, by the above writing, and we ourselves shall be answerable for it. 

Signed iy the sureties. 

A precisely similar engagement was signed by the Jharejas of Thurad 
and Warye. 



MAHEE KANTA. 

Bombay Government Records, No. XII. of new Series and reports hj the 

Bombay Government. 
The system of perpetual settlement whicli was adopted in Kattiawar in 
1807, and which obviated the necessity of the periodical advance of a moolk- 
geeree army, was found to be so beneficial to the country and people that it 
was soon afterwards resolved to extend it to the Gaekwar's claims in Mahee 
Kanta. The first who entered into engagements of the kind was the Chief 
of Ghorasur. It was not till 1812 that the Engagements (No. XXXI.) 
were generally concluded, by which the Chiefs bound themselves to pay the 
Gaekwar's dues on the average of what had been collected during the ten 
preceding years. These engagements, however, only settled the Gaekwar's 
claims, and left unadjusted the exactions levied by the Rajah of Edur and the 
black-mail taken by the Koolee Chiefs. Since 1820 when the Gaekwar 
agreed* to rhake over the collection of his revenue in Kattiawar and Mahee 
Kanta to the British Government, the paramount authority in Mahee Kanta 
has been exercised by the Britisli Government alone. 

In 1838 Captain, afterwards Sir James, Outram instituted border pun- 
chayets for the settlement of the numerous blood feuds and disputes between 
the wild Bheels on the Mahee Kanta and Rajpootana frontier. The system, 
which is one of money compensation for crime, was found to be very effective 
in preventing reprisals and maintaining peace. The courts however met at 
very irregular intervals owing to the difficulty of arranging a meeting between 
the Political officers on both sides of the border who presided jointly over them, 
and disturbances again became numerous. In 1873 therefore revised rules were 
drawn up, providing for the more regular assembly of these courts under one 
British officer as president, aided by two assessors from each of the States 
concerned, and enhancing the scale of compensation for certain specified crimes. 

In 1839 a court of criminal justice was established in Mahee Kanta 
similar to that which had been established in Kattiawar, to be presided over 
by the Political Agent, aided by two or three assessors, for the trial of heinous 
offences and all cases in which the parties concerned are subjects of different 
Chiefs. 

The area of Mahee Kanta is 4,000 square miles, the population 447,056, 
subject to numerous petty Chiefs, of whom the Rajah of Edur is the most 

* See Gaekwar, p. 235. 
IV 9 



66 Mahee Kanta Agency— Edur. 

important. The entire revenues amount to about eleven lakhs of rupees, of 
which the Gaekwar receives Rupees 1,29,483, the Edur State Rupees 7,522, 
the British Government Rupees 918, other States Rupees 2,878. 

Ednr. — After the short tenure of the ofBee of Mogul Deputy in 
Guzerat by Abhaee Sing, Rajah of Jodhpore, his two younger brothers, 
Anund Sing and Rai Sing, aided probably by the influence of his name, 
possessed themselves of the principality of Edur. This family is the last that 
effected a settlement in Guzerat by conquest. The Edur principality con- 
sisted of the districts of Edur, Ahmednuggur, Morasa, Bayer, Hursal, 
Purantej, and Veezapore, to which five other districts were rendered tribu- 
tary. Anund Sing was killed in one of the numerous conflicts with the 
Rajpoot proprietors of the soil, and was succeeded by his young son, Sheo 
Sing, under the guardianship of Rai Sing, his uncle, who shortly afterwards 
died without issue. During the rule of Sheo Sing he was stripped of Puran- 
tej, Veezapore, and half of the three districts of Morasa, Bayer, and Hursal 
by the Peishwa, which districts were afterwards ceded by the Peishwa to the 
British Government. The other half of the Edur territories went to the Gaek- 
■ war, who contented himself with the exaction of a share of the annual reve- 
nues, which, at the settlement of 1812, was fixed in perpetuity at Rupees 
24,001 for Edur, and Rupees 8,952 for Ahmednuggur. Sheo Sing died in 1791, 
leaving five sons, the eldest of whom, Bhawur Sing, succeeded him, but died in 
a few days, leaving the State to his son, Gumbheer Sing, a boy of ten years. 

The death of Sheo Sing led to dissensions in the family, which ended 
in the dismemberment of Edur. Sugram Sing, second son of Sheo Sing, 
who had received Ahmednuggur from his father in feudal grant, assumed 
independence, and with his assistance Zalim Sing and Ameer Sing, two other 
sons of Slieo Sing, after a long struggle possessed themselves respectively of 
Morasa and Bayer during Gumbheer Sing's minority. Indur Sing, the fifth 
son of Sheo Sing, who was blind, received Soor and three other villages for 
his support. 

Sugram Sing, Chief of Ahmednuggur, died in 1798, and was succeeded 
by his son, Kurun Sing. Zalim Sing, of Morasa, died childless in 1806, and 
Morasa ought to have lapsed to Edur. His widow, however, was allowed 
by the Gaekwar to adopt Pertab Sing, Kurun Sing's brother, on whose death 
in 1821 Morasa was united with Ahmednuggur ; but Gumbheer Sing never 
ceased to lay claim to it. On the death of Ameer Sing of Bayer without 
children, the reversion of Bayer was claimed both by Edur and Ahmednuggur. 



Mahee Kanta Agency— Edur. 67 

The dispute was investigated in 1827 by the Political Agent of Mahee 
Kanta, and an Engagement (No. XXXII.) was concluded adjusting all 
the disputes between Edur and Ahmednuggur, by which Edur renounced all 
claim to Morasa and received two-thirds of Bayer, the remaining third going 
to Ahmednuggur. This settlement, however, was never acted on, and the 
disputes continued as vehement as before. 

Gumbheer Sing of Edur died in 1S33, and was succeeded by his son 
Jowan Sing. Owing to mismanagement during Jowan Sing's minority, and 
the rapacity of the leading Chiefs, the wido^ of Gumbheer Sing applied to 
the British Government to take the State under its own management. This 
was done in 1837. The control of the British Government was relaxed in 
1852, but a check on the expenditure was maintained till 1859 when the en- 
tire management of the State was- transferred to the Rajah. 

The Chief of Ahmednuggar, Kurun Sing, died in 1835, leaving two 
sons, Pirthee Sing and Tukht Sing. On his death a forcible suttee oc- 
curred, notwithstanding all the efforts of the British officers to prevent it. 
Immediately after the performance of the rite, Pirthee Sing and Tukht Sing 
with their followers fled to the hills. At the same time several of the subor- 
dinate Chiefs were in rebellion. To prevent a general outbreak an amnesty 
was proclaimed, of which Pirthee Sing and Tukht Sing were the first to avail 
themselves. Pirthee Sing was installed in Ahmednuggur on his engaging 
(No. XXXIII.) to prevent the practice of suttee, to entertain no foreign 
mercenaries, to refer all disputes to the British Government, and to abide by 
the engagements of 1812. Pirthee Sing died in 183&, and on the death of 
his posthumous son in 1841 the succession devolved on Tukht Sing. This 
Chief was elected ruler of the State of Jodhpore* on the death of Maun 
Sing in 1843. On his removal to Jodhpore he still claimed the right to 
retain Ahmednuggur in his family, but in 1848 the British Government de- 
cided that this claim was invalid, and that Ahmednuggur should revert to 
Edur, and with it Morasa and Bayei". 

Jowan Sing, who received a Sunnud (No. XVIII.) guaranteeing to him 
the right of adoption and was a Knight Commander of the Most Exalted 
Order of the Star of India, died in December 1868 when the succession of 
his only son, Kesree Sing, was recognized by the British Government. 
During the minority of the young Chief, who is now fourteen years of age, 
the State is managed by the Political Agent. 

~~ * See Vol. III., p. 92. 



68 



Mahee Kanta Agency—Petty CMefs. 



In 1861 Agreements (No. XXXIV.) were executed by the Chiefs of Edur 
and other States in the Mahee Kanta, binding themselves to prevent the smug- 
gling of salt through their territories. In 1874 an Agreement (No. XXXV.) 
was concluded with the Edur State for the construction of a weir in the 
river Huthmuttee and of a canal through Edur territory. By this agreement 
civil and criminal jurisdiction within canal limits was delegated to, and 
accepted by, the British Government. 

The gross revenues of Edur, which are shared by the Rajah with his feudal 
Chiefs, are about six lakhs of Rupees, the net revenue amounts to 2| lakhs. 
The military force of the State consists of 14 field and 3 other guns, 12 artil- 
lerymen, 400 cavalry, and 500 infantry and police. The subordinate Chiefs hold 
their estates on condition of military service, the quota being three horsemen 
for every Rupees 1,000 of revenue : the actual force maintained by them 
amounts to about 568 cavalry and the same number of infantry ; these troops 
are undisciplined. The Chief receives a salute of fifteen guns. 

The Chief of Edur pays annually Rupees 30,339-15-2 as "ghas dana," 
or forage for cattle, to the Gaekwar, and receives Rupees 19,140-6-11 as 
" kitchree," or supplies "for troops, from Chiefs in the Mahee Kanta. 

Petty Cliiefs. — The Rajah of Edur and Ahmednuggur is the only power- 
ful Chief in Mahee Kanta. The other Chiefs have only petty jurisdictions. 
Many of them belong to Koolee families, and both before and since the 
introduction of British influence into Mahee Kanta have been notorious chiefly 
as turbulent freebooters. A minute account of the various occasions on which 
the British Government has interfered to quiet the country and maintain peace 
before and since the general settlement of Mahee Kanta would be out of 
place. The nature of the settlements made will appear from a perusal of the 
Engagements (Nos. XXXVI. to XLII.). There are in all 58 of these 
States, of which 54 are tributary. The following are the most important : — 



Nami; OB 

PlACB. 


Name of Chief. 


Caste. 


Age. 


Land 

under 

eultiva- 

tion. 


Popula- 
tion, 


Eevenue. 


Tribute. 


Pol 


Eao Humeer 
Singjee. 

Rana Ilnrvee 
Singjee. 


Eahtore Ejypoot 
Purmar „ 


28 
63 


Beegahs 
55,000 

30,000 


4,919 
11,762 


16,700 
45.001 


iJ». CI. p. 


Danta ... 


f 2,371 1 11 to Gaekwar. 
I 513 16 3 „ Edur. • 



Mahee Kanta Agency— Petty Chiefs. 



69 



Namb OB 

I'LiCB. ' 


>Jame of Chief. 


Caste. 


Age. 


Land 
under 
cultiva- 
tion. 


Popula- 
tion. 


Revenue.' 


Tribute. 










Beegahs 




Sb. a. 


P- 


Ss. a. 


p. 


Malpoor... 


Kawul Sew 
Singjee. 


Rah tore Rajpoot.. 


31 


81.696 


10,303 


12,000 





( 301 
i 365 
(. 130 3 


to Gaekwar. 
„ Edur. 
6 „ Br. Govt. 


Mansa ... 
Mohimpore 


Thakoor Raj 
Singjeo. 

Domed Sing. 


Ghowna ,, 
Eehwur „ 


25 
21 


22,000 
14,800 


11,893 
14,011 


23,000 
28,0(Jb 






11,751 

( 4,749 11 
\ 2,219 9 
I 7 8 


„ Gaekwar. 

2 „ Gaekwar. 
2 „ Edur. 
„ Br. Govt. 


Wursora 


Thakoor 
Ki s s r e e 
Sing. 


Chowra „ 


33 


9,300 


3,881 


10,500 





1,682 11 


9 „ Gaekwar. 


Pethapore 


TakoorHimut 
Sing. 


Wagela „ 


28 


16,600 


6,898 


16,000 





8.631 11 


6 „ Gaekwar. 


Eanasun... 


Thakoor 
WujeySing. 


Eohwur „ 


68 


33,223 


6,329 


8,000 





( 376 6 
^ 749 8 
I 3 7 


2 „ Gaekwar. 
8 „ Edur. 
1 „ Br. Govt. 


Punadra... 
Khoral ... 

Ghorasur 


Meeah Abhee 
Sing. 

Meeah Sirdar 
Sing. 

T h ak or 
SoonymuH. 


MookwanaKoolee, 
Mahomedan. 

Mookwana 
Koolee, Maho- 
medan. 

Dabee Koolcc ... 


12 
37 
26 


16,660 
6,500 

15,000 


2,811 
2,814 

8,273 


12,032 
14,000 

22,000 








375 

(■ 1,751 
I 766 2 

f 3,601 
I 488 


(, Gaekwar. 

„ Gaekwar. 
10 „ Br. Govt. 

„ Gaekwar. 
8 „ Br. Govt. 


Kutosun... 


Thakoor 
K u r r u m 

Sing. 


Mookwana „ ... 


27 ' 


15,695 


1,B05 


20,000 





1,598 6 


3 „ Gaekwar. 


Ilol 


Thakoor 
W u k ht 
Sing. 


Ditto ditto ... 


U 


15,000 


5,511 


15.636 





< 1,863 3 
I 128 6 


1 „ Gaekwar, 
1 „ Edur. 


Amulyara 


Thakoor Amur 
Sing. 


Kant £oolee ... 


37 


35,916 


10,661 


. 20,000 





316 10 


8 „ Gaekwar, 


Wulnsna 
Dublia ... 


Thakoor 
V e erum 
Deo. 

Meeah Golab 


Eahtoro Rajpoot 

Mookwana 
Koolee Maho- 
medan. 


30 
37 


7,600 
16,800 


3,880 
1,612 


1,500 
1,025 






280 1 

(■ 150 
I 63 


1 „ Gaekwar, 

„ Gaekwar. 
„ Amulyara. 


Wttsna ... 


.Thakoor 
Sing Tukht. 


Rahtore Rajpoot 


2 


10,735 


4,150 


7,010 





3,108 11 


2 „ Gaekwar. 


Sudasna... 


Thakoor 
Purbut Sing 


Barud „ ... 


55 


10,000 


6,365 


8,019 





f 1,036 6 
1 361 1 


7 „ Gaekwar, 
2 „ Edur. 


Eiipal ... 
Dadhalya 


Thakoor Man 
Sing. 

T h ak or 
Th e t to e 
Sing. 


Rehwur „ 
Sesodia ,, ... 


29 
36 


21,000 
16,500 


3,173 
3,118 


3,201 
3,000 






< 1,161 13 
1 362 1 

r 699 4 
I 610 9 


6 „ Gaekwar. 
1 „ Edur. 

6 „ Gaekwar. 
6 „ Edur, 


Mugoree... 


T h ak or 
Hamut Sing 


Rahtore „ ... 


41 


24,726 


2,718 


5,000 





93 1 10 „ Edur. 



70 



Mahee Kanta Agency— Petty Chiefs. 



• 

Name of 
Flacs. 


Name of Chief. 


-Caste. 


Age. 


Land 
under 
cultiva- 
tion. 


Popula- 
tion. 


Revenue. 


Tribute. 










Beegahs 




S>. ». p. 


Ms. a. p. 




Tbakoor Eaj 

Sing. 

T hakoor 
Oojub Sing. 


Kehwur Eajpoot.. 
Barria Eoolee . . 


6S 


26,160 
10,000 


3,269 
4,001 


10,061 
6,000 




Siithumba 


37 


f 401 to Gaekwar. 
\ 461 „ Balasinore. 
C 127 „ Loonawara. 


Bumas ... 


Meeab Kulloo 


Mahomed an ... 


10 


6.126 


1,651 


1,600 


16S 6 4 „ Gaekwar. 


Bolundra 


T hakoor 
Jowuu Sing. 


Eehwur Rajpoot 


£4 


5,300 


647 


600 


133 14 4 „ Edur. 


Likhee ... 


T hakoor 
Amur Sing. 


Mookwana Koolee 


38 


3,800 


1,082 


1,305 








Gubut ... 


T hakoor 
Wujey Sing 


Ditto 


2 


3,800 


1,256 


2,500 


43 1 „ Edur. 



Mahee Kanta Agency— General— No. XXXI. 71 



No. XXXI. 

Secueitt Bond of sixteen Articles taken by Lieutenant-Colonel Ballanttne on 
behalf of the Beitish Goveenment from the Chiefs of the Mahee Kanta in the 
year 1812. 

We, Thalioor * * Koonwur * * brothers, nephews, and 
inhabitants of * * together with those bearing arms and dependent 
on the zillah. 

According to the custom of the country we have received the orders of 
government as subjects to be obedient, and to live peaceably and orderly. We 
agreeing thus do of our own accord write the Articles of zamin, f ael zamin, 
arr zamin, hazir zamin, and mal zamin as follows : — 

Article 1. 
We will not be guilty of any violence, theft, &c., nor -will we instigate 
others to such acts in any part of the country. We will not associate with, 
nor instigate others to associate with, outlaws, whether Koolees (Rajpoots), 
Mussulman soldiery, Kattees, or other offenders. We will not give them 
shelter, nor food, nor hooka, nor water ; if these come into our villages we 
will seize and give them up to government ; if they should be passing through 
our boundaries we will pursue, seize, and deliver them up, and then act as 
government shall order. We will not in any way assist disturbers. Should 
we be detected in having anything to do with them we will be answerable to 
government. 

If the footsteps of thieves are traced into our boundaries we will carry 
them forward and deliver them over to the next village ; if the thief should 
belong to our village we will hand him over to government, and the property 
stolen. Should we know that the people of the next village are engaged in 
any unlawful acts we will make it known ; if we do not we will answer for 
it ourselves. If any of our people go into the Company's districts, or into 
any other talookas, to steal we will be answerable ; if the thief should be 
killed in the act we will not make any claim, nor raise any feud on that 
account. 

Article 2. 

The management of our talooka and land shall always be conducted in 
obedience to government as hitherto. 

Article 3. 

We agree to the arrangement of government regarding the dues of ghas- 
dana, jummabundee, khichree, and other lawful demands; in that manner we 
will pay them annually. The government dues and certain dues to zemindars 
are payable by us, and we have given banker's security for their payment 
in that manner we will pay without fail. 



72 Mahee Kanta Agency— General— No. XXXI. 



Article 4. 

Should we have taken possession of any zemindar's land or village 
through his weakness, we will give them up at the government order on 
reasonable terms. Should we have obtained any one's land or villages by a 
loan of money, we agree to its being redeemed in any reasonable way gov- 
ernment may decide on, and lay no claim on the land, nor will we dispute 
with the owner of the village about it. Should there be any dispute on 
money transactions, either now or hereafter, we will refer it to government 
and abide by its decision, but will not quarrel direct with the parties, nor 
accumulate any expense on them, nor without the consent of government will 
we purchase or take in pledge or present any lands, Girass, or village. 

Article 5. 

We will not quarrel, nor fight, nor instigate others in our talooka, with 
our relatives or among ourselves. If there should be any disturbance of this 
kind, we will refer it to government and abide by its decision ; we will not 
act for ourselves in anything. If any villages quarrel or collect a mob we 
will have nothing to say to it. If there should be a government thanna now 
or hereafter, as they shall tell us so will we do. 

Article 6. 
Our lawful dues, Girass, wanta, vole daan rukhoopa whatever we have 
always enjoyed, and claim either in the Company's districts, or in talookdars' 
or zemindars' lands, we will give a detailed account of such to government ; 
and as government shall provide for its payment, we and our children, to the 
latest posterity, shall abide by. What government will give we will receive 
with gratitude. Should there be any boundary dispute it shall be referred 
to government ; what shall seem reasonable to government to decide we will 
agree- to. 

Article 7. 

If any Girassia shall come to live in our talooka and shall not receive 
his Girass, runwutia,* pusaeeta,t we will inform government, but will not 
allow him to proceed to violence direct; if we fail in this, and anything 
happens in consequence, we will be answerable, or we will hand over such 
Girassia to government. We will take care that no servant of ours while 
in our service, being discharged, shall, under pretence of claims on us, create 
any disturbance, be he Rajpoot, Koolee, or other, or we will be answerable. 

Article 8. 
We will not impede any merchant or traveller going or coming ; we will 
protect the roads. If any loss is incurred in our bouiidaries we will expel 
and hand up the author to f?overnment and be answerable. We will not 
levy more than ordinary transit dues on any persons. 



* Blood compensation. f Land held free of rent. 



Mahee Kanta Agency— General— No. XXXI. 73 



Article 9. 

Should there be any sebrandy, horse and foo>% in onr serviee, "vhether 
Sindees, Arabs, Mukranees, or other f oreigners, we will discharge them ; and 
we will not maintain foreigners in future, nor allow others to do so. If we 
shall be proved to do so hereafter we will be answerable, and we agree to any 
punishment government may inflict. 

Artictle 10. 

Should we have given to any one from our paternal estate or shares of 
our brotherhood any Gireiss, wanta, pusaeeta, in payment of loan or compen- 
sation of blood, or inam, we will not resume without repayment or compen- 
sation^ 

Any Girass or land given for the maintenance of our brothers or relatives, 
which they have always enjoyed, shall not be resumed ; if in these things 
there should be any dispute it shall be referred to government, and any reason- 
able order obeyed. 

Abticle 11. 

If any one in the company's service, or any troops, be eoming or goiug, 
we will guard and watch them while on our boundaries, and, according to the 
custom of the country, will give them guides and guards to escort them 
beyond our boundaries. 

Article 13. 

If the Koolees of our boundaries have any horses it shall be made known 
to government, and as orders shall be received, they shall keep them or not. 
If we offend government, and government take our horses from us, we can 
lay no claim on that score. 

Article IS. 

We will not allow any one to smuggle opium without a perwannah from 
government sealed. Should it be attempted we will seize it and report it to 
government, and as government shall order so will we do. 

Article 14. 
If any mehta or sepoy shall come to superintend at our villages we will 
show all our papers and accounts, and will not refuse. 

m 

Article 15. 
For any past robberies, if any footsteps have been brought to our village, 
or the tliief is proved to be in our village, or the stolen goods are proved to 
be in our village, we will restore the whole, and be answerable to government. 

Article 16. 
Besides the above Articles we will obey any orders of government. If 
for any money matters, or any business, or to give evidence, any person is 
required we will produce him. 

10 



74 Mahee Kanta Agency— Edur— No. XXXII. 



In this manner we have written sixteen Articles, and we and our posterity 
will abide by them ; if we fail herein we will abide by such punishment as 
government may inflict. For adherence to these Articles, our country and 
lands, Girass and revenue, are our securities for our good conduct. Bharote 
* * * of the pergunnah * * is fa'el zamin, hazir zamin, and 
mal zamin, and Tbakoors * * * of * * * are our counter 
securities, together with their villages. As above written, every year and for 
ever these shall be answerable and make us so. 



No. XXXII. 



Tbanslation of an Aoebbment entered into by Sebe Mahaeaj Kueun Sing, Koobe 
PiETHEE Sing, and Tukht Sing, of Ahmednuggue, with Seee Mahaeaj Gumbheee 
Sing, of Bdue, on the amicable settlement of their mutual claim to the Baybe Peb- 
GUNHAH, viz. — 

Article 1. 

Whatever revenue realized from the talookas of Ahmednuggur, Morasa, 
and Megraj, and from the villages of Saberkaunta, together with whatever 
claims for hetcheree and salamee we may have on the Brahmins and Girassias of 
the above three talookas, and which we have enjoyed from former times, to 
remain in our possession, retaining also our right on Suchodur and Peplodur. 

Aeticle 3. 

You have with your free will and pleasure bestowed on us the Morasa 
and Megraj talookas : these we will enjoy. 

Article 3. 

The Bayer pergunnah, which Ameer Singjee enjoys, and regarding which 
we have come to the following amicable understanding : — 

Whatever i-evenue may be collected from Bayer, Rupees 1,501 to be paid 
yearly to Kakajee Wagheljee and her two daughters for their maintenance ; of 
the balance remaining, one- third to be ours, two- third yours, to be divided 
according to the sum realized. The share given to you will remain yours as 
long as sun and moon may endure. Should Waghela Kakajee die, or her 
daiighters Phuljee and Phutjee marry or die, then the sum allotted for their 
maintenance to be divided amongst us, two-thirds yours, the remaining third 
ours. 

Article 4. 
We empower you to marry the three Baees, Ajujee Lall, Phuljee Lall, 
and Phutjee Lall, to whomsoever you please. We will pay Rupees 7,001 on 
account of the expenses of the marriage; any sum exceeding that must he 
paid by yourself. The marriage and household expenses of Ajujee Lall you 
must yourself defray, with it we have nothing to do; the sum oJE Rupees 7,001 



Mahee Kanta Agency— Edur— No. XXXII. 75 

we give but oneoj and only on the condition that you effect their marriage. 
If they remain unmarried then that sum is not to be paid. The marriages 
of Ajujee Lall, Phuljee Lall, and Phutjee Lall being effected by youj the 
amount abovementioned will be paid by us. 

Article 5. 
The talooka of Kuntaloo Bara, including fineSj property, customs, ketcheree, 
vera, &c., together with whatever may be produced therefrom, we have 
bestowed on you with the ghasdana. We will never make any claim thereto. 
Enjoy the same from one generation to another ; for as long as the sun and 
moon may endure so long will it be yours, neither I nor any who may succeed 
to me will prefer a claim thereto. 

In this way have we, being in full possession of our faculties, and with our 
free will and consent, and through the instrumentality of Colonel Ballan- 
tyne, entered into the conditions of this agreement, which will be respected 
accordingly. We will give no encouragement to the haramkores of your 
country, and you must not afford any to ours. The enemies of both talookas to 
be the mutual enemies of each. I will enjoy the putta of Wurragaum, which 
is under Morassa ; you may take back all lands, villages belonging to Hursal, 
which may have been forcibly taken possession of in Wurragaum. There 
shall be no obstruction from me. Whatever claims Hur>al may have in 
Purosum shall be settled. The ghasdana of Dawaree Veerawala, which is 
included in the tribute paid by Edur, we will pay to you yearly. What is 
above written shall be respected, and Sree Samlajee is offered as a guarantee 
that no difference will occur hereon, which will be respected even as the words 
of an holy man. 

Svitnvut 1883, Bysach Soodh IQiA, Shunewar, Camp Edur. 

(Sd.) Mahakaj Kueun Sing. 

„ KOOEB PiRTIIEE SiNGJEE. 

J, TUKHT SiNGJEE. 

Above written is correct. 

Written by Dessaee Oochul Kuttoo by order of Maharaj Kurxjn 
Sing. 

Witness Ootegurn Ram Jeewan Ram, 

by order of the huzoor. 

S A D R A, ) Bharote Oomed Sing Bunnee Sing. 

The Uh May 1843. ) Kumpawat Pirthee Sing. 



76 Mahee Kanta Agency— Edur— No. XXXIII. 



No. XXXIII. 

Teanslation of a Papee addressed to Captain Outeam, Acting Political Agent, Mahee 
Kanta, by Mahaeaj Pikthee Singjeb KtrnrN Singjee. 

In your letter to me, dated 18th February 1836, you informed me that 
it was the inteation of the British Government to restore my throne and 
kingdom to me if I would subscribe to certain conditions therein enumerated ; 
to these conditions I agree as follows : — 

Article 1. 

I will abide by the said agreement that was entered into in 1812 with 
the British Government. 

Article 3. 

From this time forward neither I nor my children nor my posterity will 
perform the ceremony of suttee. 

Article 3. 

I will appoint a respectable and active minister to manage the business 
of my State, subject to the approval of the British Government. 

Article 4. 

I will pay my ghasdana and any balance that may be due to His 
Highness the Guikwar through my Nishadar Domed Sing Bharote, of Putton, 
and in future I will continue my nisha as heretofore. 

Article 5. 

The expenses of the individuals confined at Sadra on account of the 
suttee shall be defrayed by me. 

Article 6. 

I will retain no Arabs, Mukranees, Purdessies, or others, whether horse 
or foot, except those that are old servants of my house. 

Article 7. 
If there should be any quarrel between any of my Thakoors and any 
village I will make known the same to the Pohtical Agent, and as he shall 
advise so will I do. 

Article 8. 

I will not attack the Thakoor of any village without the permission of 
the Political Agent. 



Mahee Kanta Agency— Edur—N"o. XXXIV. 77 



Article 9. 

_ My minister Mahadjee Soobhavut is guilty in the afPair o£ the suttee, 
I will not give him shelter within my territory. 

I will act aecordiDg to what I have written above. 

In Maharajee Pirthee Singjee's handwriting. 
What is written above is correct, 

Ahmednuggur,"! (Sd.) Tukht Singjee. 

\Uh February l^ZQ. J 



No. XXXIV. 



Translation of an Yadee, dated 28tli October 1861, passed by the Edtte Duebae when 

Majoe Whitelock was Poiitical Agent in the Maheb Kanta. 

* 

1. The duty on Marwar salt by way of Poseena amounts to Rupees 
250, and the duty on other merchandize taken away in exchange for the salt 
from this Putta amounts to Rupees 1,000, altogether Rupees 1,250, but from 
the stopping of this salt and the consequent decrease of other merchandize 
taken from the Putta, 1 claim Rupees 700 as compensation for the salt which 
comes by way of Poseena, and Rupees 300 is the revenue derived from the 
duty on the salt in Kheroje, for this I claim Rupees 300. 

The duty on salt which passes into the territory of the Edur State 
amounts to Rupees 1,000, for this I claim Rupees 700, altogether Rupees 
1,600. To please the Sircar I have only shown what is due on account of 
compensation for salt alone, but the revenue derived from the duty on salt is 
fluctuating, therefore in exchange for the duty on salt which comes by way 
of Poseena, I should get a jaghire, so that in future I should receive no 
hindrance. 

2. After the arrangements about the salt are completed, should any one 
bring salt from Marwar via Poseena and other places into my State, and if 
such person is arrested by Sircar's men and handed over to me, I will put 
under attachment the carts or bullocks on which such salt may be, and have 
it sold by auction, and divide the proceeds into three shares, of which one share 
will be given to the person who gave the news thereof, and one share will be 
given to the sepoys of the Sircar's Chowkee and to the Karkuo and half of one 
share to the Talookdar in whose territory the capture is made, and the balance 
will be taken by my State, and beyond this the Sircar will not be troubled in 
the matter. 

3. After these arrangements are made, and six months after a proclama- 
tion has been promulgated that salt from Marwar is not to be brought into 
my territoiy ; if any Sircar's ofBcial informs me that there is such salt from 
Marwar in any one's house or shop or other place in my State, I will attach 



78 Mahee Kanta Agency— Edur- No, XXXIV. 



and have it sold by auction, and the amount derived from the sale v^ill be dis- 
posed of as laid down in the 2nd paragraph ; but if before the six months 
^ • has* expired any one informs me that either in his house or 

shop there are a certain number of maunds of salt, and that 
he is not able to sell it within the six months, then should purchase it at 
the rate obtaining then, if not tlien a Sunnud should be given to the owner 
permitting him to sell the salt, and after it has been sold the Sunnud should 
be taken back. 

4. The inhabitants of my talooka obtain Marwar salt at a low price, 
and when that is put a stop to in case salt at an equally low rate cannot be 
obtained from the Sircar's salt pans. My subjects are not rich, so the Sircar 
should fix a price and enable them to obtain salt from the Sircar's salt pans. 
At about the same low rate they at present get the Marwar salt at, so that 
they may not feel aggrieved or suffer loss. 

In order to assist the Sircar in making the arrangements for the preven- 
tion of salt passing into my State from Marwar I have written as above, 
therefore if arrangements are made in accordance with what is written above 
then I acquiesce, therefore I should receive from the Sircar an agreement to 
the above effect, and I will make arrangements as above about the salt. 

lUh October 1?,&\.—Edur. 

True translation. 

Sadea, ■) (Sd.) P. H. LeGbyt, 

The Z\st May 1873. / Acting Political Agent. 



Teanslation of a Letter from Mahakaja Jowast Singhjee of Edue, to Captain 

J. Black, Political Agent. 

After compliments. — Your letter of the 23nd May last on the subject of 
the exclusion of Marwar salt I received, and I replied thereto on the 24th 
idem, on which you again wrote to me on the 26th idem, and to that letter 
I replied on the 2nd ultimo ; after that, my Karbaree Kevulram and Sirdar 
Thakoor Urjun Singjee being with you at Sadra, you requested them to ascer- 
tain the price at which I required the salt should be sold by Government, so 
as to be cheap enough for the Edur Sunsthan ryots : on this, Karbaree Kevul- 
ram and Thakoor Urjun Sing represented to you*that I had on a previous 
* 28th October 1861 occasion presented a yad* and that if Govern- 

ment were to give the salt at Anwurpore gratis 
even, it could not be supplied at a rate such as would suit the Edur ryots, but 
that the salt should be supplied at the rate of one anna per (Bengal) maund, 
to which you replied that you wished me to put in writing what terms I 
wished for the information of Government- My reply is as follows : — 

1. You informed me at Edur that Government had sanctioned com- 
pensation to me at the rate of Rupees 1,600 per annum, provided I should 



Mahee Kanta Agency— Danta—BTo. XXXIV. 79 



agree to exclude Marwar salt, but I, from the first, informed Major Whiteloek 
that I required a jaghire of that value, on which that gentleman wrote to the 
Dufturdar, Mr. HeeraLall Balcrishna (then atBdur), to inform me that when 
the division should take place of the co-shared villages, that matter would 
be considered, and you also told me so ; and in receiving compensation as you 
are aware many difficulties arise, and you ai*e aware too that my receipts on 
account of dan are of a fluctuating kind, just like the revenues of a village, 
and should I receive compensation I might be annoyed with Government 
taxes, and the way to avoid all such annoyances is to give me a jaghire, 
therefore as before requested let a jaghire be given of the value of Rupees 1,600. 

i to Informer. 2- ^ stipulate for the division .of smuggled 

i to Government servants. salt that may be seized according to the scale I 
i to Maharaj of Edur. agreed to in my yad of 28th October 1861. 

3. You informed me that Government wished that all cases of smuggling 
should be made over to the Political Agent for disposal by him, but should 
any offence, such as smuggling, be committed, it should be disposed of by me 
if it occurs within my jurisdiction. 

4i. With regard to any Marwar salt which may be in the houses of my 
ryots after the Marwar salt has been declared contraband, I require that the 
provisions of the 3rd paragraph of my former yad may be observed, viz , that 
from the date of the proclamation excluding Marwar salt, six months may 
be allowed to my bunyas and other? to dispose of any Marwar salt they 
may have. 

5. Should Government give me compensation in jaghire instead of 
money, I agreed in my letter of the 1st June to take salt if it were given at 
such a price as would enable the ryots to purchase it at the same rate as Mar- 
war salt, but to please Government and on condition that the price shall never 
be raised, and that sufficient salt be given at that price for all the inhabitants 
of my Sunsthan, on my order to the person in charge of the salt work, and 
on condition that Government give me a Sunnud granting me these conditions, 
I agree to take salt at one anna per Bengal maund. 



True translation. 
Edur, ) (Sd.) J. Black, 

T/ie Ziid July 1863. ) Political Agent. 

True copy. 

(Sd.) P. H. LbGeyt, 
Acting Political Agent. 



Tbanslation of a Lettee from the Rana of Daunta to Majok Whitblock, Political 
Agent, Mahee Kanta, dated the 20th February 1857, No. 341. 

After compliments. — On receipt of your letter No. 4245, dated the 
15th November 1856, and other letters Nos. 4326, 53, 272, and 473 on the 



80 Mahee Kanta Agency— Danta— No, XXXIV. 



subject of putting a stop to salt being brought from Byatra and Bakeysir 
through my talooka and of my rehnquishing my right to take the duty on this 
salt on receiving compensation in lieu of it from the Sircar, I sent to your 
presence my Vakeel, Narotamdas Ijatram, and I have received a letter from 
bini, telling me what instructions he has received from you, and therefore I 
now write : — 

1*^. — On Wallace Sahib requesting it, I had formerly furnished a state- 
ment showing the receipts on account of revenue from duty on salt for 15 
years from 1892 to 1905 Sumbut. After this at your request a statement 
shewing receipts of revenue on the same account from 1908 Sumbut to 1911 
Sumbut was sent to you. 

From the improvements in the roads and better arrangements for the 
safety of travellers, the receipts for the four years are considerably larger than 
those for the 15 years which will be perceived by you, and I am hopeful that 
through proper arrangements, the revenue in every way will be increased, so 
that to relinquish my right to take the duty on this salt and to take iu 
exchange a fixed sum is not what I wish to do at all, but as it is the wish of 
the Sircar I do not wish to oppose it, so to please the Sircar I agree. 

In the statement of the receipts for salt revenue for four years, namely, 
from 1808 Sumbut to 1811 Sumbut before furnished, there is not mentioned 
the amount of duty on salt which the Bheels and other poor people of my 
talooka had been excused from paying, and if this duty were to be taken from 
them at any time again, they could not deny them liability to pay it, but 
when the Sircar fixes a certain sum as compensation, then it can neither be 
increased nor lessened, therefore you should take the revenue I receive on 
account of the duty on salt into consideration, and estimate its amount at an 
increased rate, but should you not be disposed thus to increase it, then for 
such a trifling amount I am not willing to give you trouble. 

If an average is taken of the receipts on account of revenue from duty 
on salt for the four years from Sumbut 1908 to Sumbut 1911 it gives one of 
Rupees 31 per annum, for which sum I beg you will make an arrangement, 
and on receiving your reply I will cease from taking duty on salt, but for the 
sake of my subjects I feel it necessary to state as follows for your favourable 
consideration — that when the Pahlunpoor Dewan and Thakoor Therad agreed 
to stop taking duty on salt and to receive in exchange a fixed sum, it was 
settled by the Sircar that they should obtain as much salt as was required for 
the use of their subjects from the salt pans of the Sircar, and that the price of 
it should be somewhat lower than the price then obtaining. I beg you will 
write to the Sircar and make a similar arrangement for my subjects) and I 
am hopeful if you do thus write that the Sircar will give its consent. 

Favor me with correspondence. 

Metee-Mah wiid lltk War ShooJeer 1913 "Said." 



True translation. 
P. H. LeGe: 

The ilsl May 1873. j Aciing PoUk Agent. 



Sadea, I (Sd.) P. H. LeGeyt, 

3. ) 



Mahee Kanta Agency— Sameyra and Pol— Ifo. XXXIV. 81 

Teanslation of an Agebement passed by the Thazooe of Sameyea to Majoe White- 
lock, Political Agent, Mahee Kanta. 

Written by the Thakoor of Sameyra Becharji Savji as follows : — 
It is the wish of the Sircar to make arrangements to prevent salt from 
Marwar and places of another jurisdiction being brought into the Mahee Kanta, 
if the Sircar makes such arrangemejnts then I agree to prevent salt being 
brought through my State from places of another jurisdiction, but in conse- 
quence of this I shall be a loser, therefore in exchange for the duty on said 
salt, I am willing to take as compensation annually Rupees 35 of the 
Bombay currency, so from the date the Sircar orders it j I agree from that date 
to stop salt from places in another jurisdiction passing through my territory 
and from that date I should receive annually Rupees 35, and if the Sircar 
makes arrangements for presenting salt from places ih another jurisdiction 
passing through my territory and if the Sircar orders me to see to this and to 
help in the matter I will act up to such orders. 

Shrawan wad Wth Sumhut 1917 "SJianiwar," ZUt August 1861. 

S A D K A . (Sd.) Thakooe Bechabji Savji. 

Written by Parick Lallu Pitambardas of Attursumba, at the wish of the 
principal. 

Given before me at Sadra on 31st August 1861. 

(Sd.) C. R. Whitelock. 

True translation. 

Sadka, ) (Sd.) P. H. LeGeyt, 

Slst May 1873. ) Aciing Fold. Agent, Mahee Kanta. 



Teanslation of an Ageeement passed by the Thakooe of Pol, to Majoe Whitelock, 
Political Agent, Mahee Kanta, dated 9th September 1871. 
After compliments.— The Sircar's Hoozoor Karkoon, Amrut Lai Gulab- 
chand has informed me of the wish of the Sircar to prevent salt passing into 
and from the Mahee Kanta from Marwar and other places. I agree to the 
wishes of the Sircar and beg to write that no salt passes through my Putta 
of Pal into the Mahee Kanta from the salt pans m Marwar and places ot 
another jurisdiction, and as it is the wish of the Sircar 1 agree and write 
that for the future I will put a stop to any salt being taken from the salt 
pans in Marwar and places of another jurisdiction through my Putta of 
Pal into the Mahee Kanta nor will I allow it to be brought into the Putta. 

IV 



82 Mahee Kanta Agency— Pol— No. XXXIV. 

Salt is brought from Marwar and other places for the use of the people 
in my villages by way of Poseena^ Putta, and other places passing through the 
villages of Edur, and passing through my Putta it is taken into Meywar and 
Wagar and other Zillas, the duty on this and on the salt from the Sircar's 
salt pans passing through my Putta is received by my Durbar. A statement 
showing the receipts for five years from Sumbut 1912 to Sumbut 1916 is sent 
the Sircar will take this into consideration, but I wish to mention that except 
transit duties there is no revenue in my Putta, so if the Sircar will take 
this into consideration and will make an arrangement to give me compensa- 
tion yearly I will agree to it, and stop taking the duty on the salt from 
Marwar and other places in Rajasthan which comes into this Putta through 
Edur and other places, and which passing through my Putta goes into Meywar 
Wagar and Malwa, and will not allow it to be brought into or taken through ' 
my Putta. 

In this manner if the salt from Marwar and places of another jurisdic- 
tion is stopped from being brought, you. Sir, should make arrangements for 
a sufficient quantity of salt for the use of my subjects to be obtained at low 
rate from the Sircar's salt pans. 

In the above manner I have agreed and write this ^ agreement, the Sircar 
therefore should order as it thinks fit, so that the ordei" may be carried into 
effect. 

Tke Wi September 1861. Bliadarwar Sud Uh Sumbut 1917 "Warsome." 

(Sd.) Thakoor Lakhman Singjee. 

True translation. 

Sadra, I (Sd.) P. H. LeGeyt, 

The Zlst May 1873. ) Acting. PoUl. Agent, Mahee KaMa. 



Teansiation of an Ageeement passed by the Eao of Pol to Majoe Whitelock, Poli- 
TiCAL Agent, Mahee Kakta, dated 12tli September 1861. 

After compliments. — The Sircar's Hoozoor Karkoon, Amrut Lai Gulab- 
chand has informed me of the wish of the Sircar to prevent salt passino- 
into the Mahee Kanta from Marwar and other places of another jurisdiction. 
I agree to the wishes of the Sirkar and beg to write that no salt passes into 
my territory from Marwar and other places of another jurisdiction, nor does it 
pass into the Mahee Kanta, and as it is the wish of the Sirkar I agree 
and write that for the future I will not allow any traders or others to pass and 
repass with salt from Marwar and places of another jurisdiction through my 
State of Pole into the Mahee Kanta, and I will stop them from doing so.' 



Blahee Kanta Agency— Dhrole— No. XXXIV. 83 



Bunjaras and other traders bring salt from Marwar and places of another 
jurisdiction for the use of the people in my villages by way of the Poseena, 
Putta, and thence through the villages of Edur, and then passing through my 
territory Jbake it for sale into Meywar and other zillas, and my Durbar enjoys 
the revenue from the duty thereon, and I send a statement showing the 
receipts for five years from Sumbut 1912 to Sumbut 1916, and after taking 
them into consideration whatever the Sircar orders 1 will agree to. Further 
about (800) eight hundred mannds of salt are required for the people of my 
Putta, if the Sircar will arrange that this may be obtained at a low rate from 
Sircar's salt pans, and give orders to that effect, then I will put a stop to the 
bringing of salt into my State from the Edur villages and to it passing from 
my State into the Meywar Zillas. 

Should any trader avoid paying duty to the Sircar and pass through any 
of the villages of my State, I will, have him apprehended and will hand him 
over to the Sircar, but should any one thus avoid paying the Sircar's duty 
unknown to me I must not be held responsible. 

In the above manner I have agreed and write this agreement, the Sircar 
therefore should do as it thinks fit. 

12fA Septembm- 1861, Baderwa Sood Uh Snmhct 1917, " War Geraoo" 

Wazeanugger. 

(Sd.) Thakookjee Nuvulsingjee. 

True translation. 
Sadea, 7 (Sd.) P. H. LeGeyt, 



1 



The Z\st May 1873. j Acting Poltl. Agent, Mahee Kanta. 



Teanslation of an Ageeement passed by the Thakooe of Deteole (Wagetla) to Majob 
Whitelock, Political Agent," Mahee Kanta, dated 13th September 1861. 

After compliments.— My request is that the Sircar's Hoozoor Karkoon, 
Amrnt Lai Gulabchaud, has informed me that it is the wish of, the Sircar to 
prevent salt passing into the Mahee Kanta from Marwar and places of 
another jurisdiction. I agree to the wishes of the Sircar and beg to write 
that no salt passes through my Patta of Deyrole to the Mahee Kanta 
from Marwar and places of another jurisdiction, and as it is the wisb ot tho 
Sircar I agree and write for the future I will put a stop to any salt being 
taken by any trader, &c., through Deyrole or any of its villages into the 
Mahee Kanta from Marwar or places of another jurisdiction. 

Salt is brought from Marwar and other places by way of Poseena Putta 
and passing through my village of Radeewar is taken into the yillages of 
Edur, and so on to Wazanagar and Pal, and it is also used by the inhabitants 
of my Putta. 



84 Mahee Kanta Agency— Deygamra— Wo. XXXIV. 



For the salt which comes from places in other Rajasthan and passes 
through Radeewar I obtained a light duty, but I keep no account of it, how- 
ever the receipts per annum are about Rupees (51) fifty-one. If the Sircar 
will take this and the fact that about (900) nine hundred maunds of salt are 
required for my subjects into consideration, and that you will make arrange- 
ments for me to obtain salt at low rate, I will stop taking duty on and 
prevent the salt being brought through my talooka into Edur and other 
zillas from Marwar and places in another jurisdiction by way of Poseena 
Putta. 

Further should it come to my knowledge that any one is attempting to 
avoid paying the Sircar's duty and is taking away salt, I will have him 
apprehended and will hand him over to the Sircar, but should any one thus 
avoid paying the duty unknown to me then I must not be held responsible. 

In the above manner I have agreed ^nd write this agreement, the Sircar 
therefore should do as it thinks fit, this is my request. 

IStk September 1861, Badefwa Sood 9tA Sumbut 1917. 

" War Shukar." 

" Beyrole." 

(Sd.) Thakoorjee, Mohobatsingji - 

SUBULSINGJI. 

" True translation." 
Sadea, ■) (Sd.) P. H. LeGeyt, 



>.} 



The 31«< May 1873. ) Acting Political Agent. 



Teansiation of an Ageeement passed to Captain Black, Politicai. Agent, Mahbb 
Kanta, by the Thakooe of Detgamea, dated April 1862. 

Written by Jessji Katooji Patwee Kooer of Thakoor Katooji Ujumji of 
Deygamra in behalf of the said Thakoor as follows :^- 

It is the wish of the Sircar to arrangements to prevent salt from Meywar 
and places of another jurisdiction being brought into the Mahee Kanta if 
the Sircar makes such arrangements then I agree to prevent salt being 
brought through my State from places of another jurisdiction, but in conse- 
quence of this I shall be a loser as to the duty on the said salt, therefore in 
exchange for this duty I am willing to take compensation annually Rupees 
10 of the Bombay currency, so from the date the Sircar orders it I agree 
from that date to stop salt from places in another jurisdiction passing, 
through my territory, and from that date I should receive annually Rupees (10) 
teu, and if the Sircar makes arrangements for preventing salt from .places in 



Mahee Eanta Agency— Edur— No. XXXV". 85 

another jurisdiction passing through my territory, and if the Sircar orders 
me to see to this and to help in the matter I will act up to such orders. 

Chaitor Wad, Sumbut 1918, A^ril 1862. 

War Edur 

(Sd.) In behalf of Thakoor Katooji Ujumji 
KooEE Jbssingji Katooji 
Witness. written by himself. 

(Sd.) Patel Abechand Shamboo of Jotana 

written bj' himself. 
(Sd.) Patel Dwaeka Punja of Jotana 
written by himself. 

(Sd.) J. Black. 
True translation. 
Sadea, 1 (Sd.) P. H. LeGeyt, 



a 



The ^Ist May 1873. ) Acting Political Agent, Mahee Kanta. 



No. XXXV. 

Translation of an Agreement between the Edue State and the British Goveenmeht. 

The following are the articles of agreement between the Edur Durbar 
and the British Grovernment. 

The river Hathmateeis near Ahraednuggur. The Hon'ble Government's 
order No. 8509, dated 16th December 1868, in the matter of the canal from 
it has been received. It is directed therein that the consent of the Maliaraja 
of Edur should be obtained to the construction of a weir in the river, and of 
a canal through the Edur limits. The undermentioned agreement has been 
passed in the matter : — 

1. In the plan there is the red line D C, showing the site on which 
the weir is to be built in the river. It should be built there. The Engineer 
first searched for a site for constructing (a weir on) and found out the afore- 
said site. It is on the east and the distance of about 350 feet. 

2. By building the weir on the abovementioned site D C, the whole 
of the water of the river will be confined and the inhabitants of Moujey 
Parbuda and other villages withiu the jurisdiction . of Edur and the Sabar 
Kanta villages which are situated along the bank of the Hathmatee river 
until its junction with the Sabar river will not get water for drinking and for 
irrigating their land with. Government have therefore agreed to keep an 
outlet for water on one side of the weir, in order that people may get water 
for drinking and irrigating their land with, in view to cultivate the same. 

3. The Karbaree of the Edur Durbar stated certain objections to the 
building of the canal from near the town of Ahmed'nuggur. Government 
thought that it would be better if the canal within the limits of Edur be exca- 
vated agreeably to the Durbar's wishes. Thereupon the Karbaree of the Edur 



86 Mahee Kanta Agency— Edur— No, XXXV. 



DurTsar expressed his desire to have the canal built from another site and 
showed the same in the plan. When an enquiry was made about that line, 
it was found that the building of the canal in that line was highly objection- 
able and that therefore it could be built. Afterwards one line was fixed for 
the construction of the canal. It is shown under C, E, P in the plan and 
the line in which it was first proposed to build, the canal joins it. From 
thence the mark from F to G is made in the plan. The Edur boundaries con- 
tinue as far as that. The Engineer had first fixed this site. Edur boundaries 
terminate at the mark G. 

4. The line, of the site for the land shown above is from north to south. 
There are roads crossing the line (between the two points). In order that 
the said roads may not be interfered with, it has been decided to construct 
three bridges over them. The sites of the bridges will be determined by the 
Political Agent and the Engineer. The bridges will be constructed at the 
expense of Government. 

5. Water will be supplied from the canal during twelve months in the 
rubbee, khareef, and hurree seasons to the land under the jurisdiction of the 
Durbar, in the same manner in which it has been decided to supply water 
to the cultivators of the villages belonging to Government. No buck or 
allowance will have to be paid to Government for taking the water. But as 
regards the quantity of water to be given, it is to be stated that the culti- 
vators of the villages under Edur will be allowed to take water in the same 
proportion in which those under Government will be allowed to take water 
ibr their land. 

6. Owing to the construction of the weir, water will accumulate for 
certain miles in the river. The people will therefore find it difficult to ford 
the river, and the cultivable land in the river will be submerged under water 
in consequence of which loss will be sustained. With reference to this. Go- 
vernment have agreed that so long as the river is unfordable, that is to say, 
until the river is filled up with sand and kurup (mud ?) and becomes fordable 
as now, a double boat capable of conveying men, cattle, carts, &c., &c., will, 
as written by the Political Agent, be maintained at the expense of Government. 
By this means the inconvenience I'elt by passengers in going and coming will 
be removed. 

The cultivable land in the river will, owing to the weir, be submerged 
under water, the produce of the said land will be taken into consideration. 
An average thereof will be taken and compensation for the proportionate 
amount that may be found for one year, will be paid annually by Government, 
and this until the land by the kuruss (mud ?) and sand being dried is hard- 
ened and becomes as it is now. Government will pay compensation until that 
time. 

7. By the construction of the weir, as mentioned above, in the river, 
there will be an accumulation of water therein. The cultivators under Edur 
have a right to convey water therefrom to raise crops on their lands. But in 
what manner and quantity should water be taken ? The provision about tak- 
ing water from the canal is stated in the preceding 5th paragraph will be 
allowed to be taken in accordance therewith. 



JIahee Kanta Agency— Petty Chiefs— Zohar Zemindars— No. XXXVI, 87 



8. Ifj in consequence of the construction of the weir in the river as 
stated above, the river is much flooded and loss is tliereby occasioned, compen- 
sation for as much loss as may he caused will be paid by Government. If per- 
adventure the river be flooded to such an extent as to oblige the inhabitants of 
Dhanda and other villages on its banks to remove their houses, &c., the loss 
will be made up by Government according to the estimate thereof framed by 
the Engineer. 

9. A place will be required for the residence of the Engineer. Tlie 
Durbar will give ground bighas 5 (five) for it without taking any price. 
Government will pay the cost of the bungalow or any other building which 
may be required to be erected thereon, 

10., Land one hundred yards wide within the limits of the Edur Saus- 
than has been given for the canal. As shown in the plan the length of the 
land commencing from the mark C on the south side of the Hathmatee river 
extends as far as the mark G, The Political Agent or the Assistant Political 
.Agent in charge of Edur is authorized by the Edur Durbar to enquire into 
and determined any revenue or criminal case that may arise within the aforesaid 
locality, and the British Government has consented to this delegation of autho- 
rity and the exercise thereof by the Political Agent and the Assistant Political 
Agent in charge of Edur, agreeably to such orders as may from time to time 
be issued by His Excellency the Governor in Council of Bombay. 
Dated Sansthan, Edur, 20M July 1874, 

The Signature of Mai-iaeanbejee 
Haleejee Sa, 

(Sd.) Venayek Wassoodew, 
Oriental Translator to Government, 

(True copy.) 

(Sd.) S. Macdonald, 

Superinleiident. 



No, XXXVI, 

Teanslation of an Ageeembnt executed by Bhaeote Samul Sing Goman Sing to 

the SiECAE GtriKWAE. 

This Agreement is executed with the Sreemunt Maharaj Sena Khas 
Kheyl Shnmsher Bahadoor, that I, Samul Sing Goman Sing, of my own 
free will and inclination, do hereby stand perpetual security for Choowan 
Bhattajee Jalljee, of Amliarah, and that I will not permit him or his people, 
brothers, nephews, relations, dependants, servants^ or subjects to commit 
disturbance or thefts in the Sircar mehals, those belonging to the Punt 
Prudhan, or the Honourable Company, 

Bhattajee shall not offer any annoyance or connive at otliers doing so 
in the mehals of Cupperbund, Deogaum, Edur, Ahmednuggur, Mandwa, 



88 Mahee Kanta Agency— Petty Chiefs— ioAo*- Zemindars— No. XXXVI. 

Moondassoo, Hursool, "Puranta, and all other pergunnahs, and he shall also 
be prevented from disturbing merchants travelling on the road or possessing 
himself by his own means or those of others of their goods or property. 

The delinquents or criminals of the Sircar shall have no asylum with 
Bhattajee or in his territories, nor will he give them countenance or encou- 
ragement ; and in the event of any person coming to Bhattajee without the 
permission or knowledge of the Sircar and the Sircar shall demand him, he 
shall be delivered up. 

In like manner if stolen property should be sold or given to Bhattajee 
or his dependants without knowing it to be such, the same will be restored 
on demand. The Mandwa pergunnah which belongs to the Sircar shall not 
in the mosb trifling degree receive annoyance or injury from Bhattajee. 

Bhattajee is to enjoy his Girass dues from the following pergunnahs in 
the same proportion as it stood in the reign of the late Futteh Sing Rao 
Guikwar, viz., Mandwa, Edur, Moondassoo, Ahmednuggur, Cupperbund, 
Deogaum, Puranta, Hursool, &c. 

All new claims for Girass on other villages or places cease from this 

day. The ghasdana, as settled by Babajee Appajee in his Mahee Kanta 

Moolookgeeree to be given to the Sircar, shall in future be annually dis- 
charged. 

Bhattajee and his servants shall faithfully perform the usual service to 
the Sircar thannah at Mandwa. Bhattajee shall not permit the Koolee of 
Lobar to reside within the limits of his territories, nor will he allow him or 
his people of every description even to stop or eat victuals at his villages, nor 
will Bhattajee's subjects associate with "the Lobar Koolees. 

I am security and personally responsible that Bhattajee shall conduct 
himself according to the tenor of this agreement, and if it should ever be 
necessary that the Sircar should send mohsuls the charges and expenses shall 
be defrayed by me. I am perpetual security. 

Wherefore witness my hand. 

(Sd.) Samul Sing Goman Sing, 

Bharote of Cujpperhund. 
I agree to be arr zamin for Bhattajee. 

(Sd.) Ram Singjee Tblleck Singjee, 

Thakoor of Agloode. 

(True translation.) 

(Sd.) J. R. Caknac, 

1*^ Assistant. 
Dated Sumbut 1804, Aswin Vud Uh, ^th Odoler 1808. 

Skee Malsakhant. 



Mahee Kanta Agency— Petty Chiefs— Zohar Zemindars— No. XXXVII. 89 

Peewannah of Anttnd Rao Guikwae Sena Khas Khetl Shumshee Bahadooe to 

EhATTAJEE of AmIiIASAH. 

You are to conduct yourself according to your separate writing. 

The English Company Bahadoor are your bhandary ; therefore you must 
remain quiet in your possessions. 

Dated Assum Soodh \Mh, \%th Shahan 1804. 



Moortub 
Soodh. 



On the part of the English East India Company. 



L. s. of 

Major 
Walker. 



No. XXXVII. 



Teanslation of a Khtjt of Genebal Secusity by the Lohae Zbmindae to the Siecae 
of Anund Rao Guikwae Sena Khas Khetl Shumshee Bahadooe. 

# To WIT.— Whereas do we, the Bhats of Cupperbund, viz., Bacher Deep- 
sing and Veeram Bacher, of our own free will and pleasure, and in behalf of 
Kotewal Nanajee Jaitajee, and Soortanjee Sirtanjee, and Roopa Gulljee, 
and Adjajee Jallumjee, and Dhunajee Soozanjee, and Oomajee Suttaghee, all 
the six sharers hereof, including also all brothers, nephews, all friends and 

'relations all the Koolees residing respectively within the separate precincts of 
each sharer, all inhabitants and those bearing arms, all those residing within 
the iampa, or town gate, of the said place, and all those who may reside m 
outerpoorahs, designated Mowarah or Warawas, and for the whole of whom 
we do hereby afford perpetual security with further counter security, to which 

' fully assenting we have executed this bond to the Sircar, providing on the 
nart of the six sharers and all others concerned, of Lobar, residing withm 
their respective precincts, that in all the districts of the Guik war dominions, 
as wettas the possessions of the Punt Prudhan and the mehals of the" Honour- 
able Enslish Company, the parties aforegoing shall not commit any act of 
irreffulantv or aggression; and further that any fugitive, thief, or plunderer 
of the dominions of three governments above related, or from the pergunnah 
Maadwa,ortalooka Edur, or Abmeduuggur, or Monassoo,or other place from 

1 It 



90 Mahee Kanta Agency— Petty Chiefa—Zohar Zemindars— TSo. XXXVZI. 



whence may come a culprit of the Sircar, or person of the description of Bhar- 
wuttea, or criminal or ryot who may come to Lohar, shall not be permitted to 
remain, nor shall be given sustenance, nor be in any way aided or counte- 
nanced, nor entertained in the different asylums, nor shall the Koolees of Lobar 
join, abet, or accompany others of such description in acts of misdemeanour, 
or plunder, or theft ; besides, all such description of persons who hitherto have, 
unknown to the parties, come and taken up his or their residence, all such 
person or persons to be given over to the custody of the Sircar ; and independ- 
ent of persons belonging to any of the three aforegoing governments, persons 
such as merchants from other countries, or Wunzaras or other, or any descrip- 
tion of traveller from any quarter, whether going or coming, shall not be 
impeded at their place of encampment or temporary residence ; neither shall 
the parties concerned instigate others to the commission of irregular deeds, 
conducting all travellers of whatever description safely through their country; 
and whereas in regard to the Girass dues of the parties from Deogaum and 
elsewhere of long standing, and of the time of the late Putteh Sing Rao Baba, 
the Sircar will make due investigation thereof in view to ascertain the extent 
of the same, which, after such process, being made permanent to them, they 
will realize the same in virtue of and according to the Sircar's orders and per- 
mission, nor shall they otherwise show hindrance or injury to the villages ; 
and of all property belonging to any of the three aforesaid Sircars or indivi- 
duals thereof such as may unknowingly have been brought to Lobar, all such 
description of property shall be restored ; nor shall the smallest injury be 
practised on the Mandwa pergunnah ; and henceforward are the parties entitled 
only to the Girass dues of old and established date, all of a later date being 
herefrom made null ; nor shall the parties show hindrance or injury to the 
ryots in view to obtain from them the Girass already realized by the Sircar, 
and they shall be strictly confined to the enjoyment of the Girass to be granted 
to them on obtaining possession of Lobar ; and whereas all ghasdana dues from 
Lobar or its dependencies, as well as jummabundee, are due to the Sircar, we 
engage that all such description of public revenue be yearly discharged to ^e 
proper authorities without difficulty ; and whereas the parties will continue in 
obedience to the Sircar, and to serve in whatever they may be commanded, 
and whereas we have become diie security for the parties in all acts of mis- 
demeanour, or in making them forthcoming, as provided for in virtue of this 
our writing to the Sircar, we do bind ourselves duly responsible in all and every 
particular obligation hereof and in any instance of default in this our deed of 
bond, being, as we are, united and equally responsible, and we will further pay 
all the Sircar monies as well as account for the due appearance of the parties. 

Bone Sumvut 1866, KarticJc Vud Sj-^^ 1809-10, November. 

To which is affixed the following signatures, viz. — 

S Barole Bacher Defcpsing. 

S „ Veerum Bacher. 

Arrzamin or counter securities are — 

1. Zallum Khant, of Ghorasur, security for Dhunajec and Gonduljee, 
having both together 1^ share. 



Mahee Kanta Agency— Petty Chiefs— Zohar Zemindars— "Sio. XXXVII. 91 



3. Kassuria Meya, of Kaumal, security for Suntajee, and Adjajee, and 
Bhuttajee, having in all 2^ shares. 

3. Joorah Meya, of Poonadera, security for Nathjee Jaitajee, having 1 
share, mating in all 5 shares. One still remains, there heing no heir thereto 
the concern and its enjoyments rests with the parties above written. 

Seek Malsakhant. 




TeanslatIon of the Peewannah of Rao Seeb Anttnd Kao Gtjikwar Sena Khas 
KhetIi Shumshee Bj&adooe to the Zbmindaes of Lohae. 

Nuthoo Jaite, Soortsihjee Seertan, Roopa GuUjee, Ahja Jallum, Dhunah 
Soozain, Oomah Puttah, and others^ to wit. 

That you did practise a series of aggression on the Sircar dominions, 
wherefore you were punished, and Lohar, your possession, was taken by the 
Sircar, whereupon you have been a fugitive for four or five years and suffered 
much ill; you, however, have lately altered your demeanour, and through the 
medium of the Honourable Company's Government preferred your petition to 
the Sircar, stating your errors and soliciting a forgiveness of your faults, and 
to reinstate you as before to live in quiet at your place, and that you would 
duly afford all description of security in behalf of your better demeanour; 
which being the subject of your petition, this Sircar has in its pleasure and in 
view to that of the Honourable Company's government directed that you be 
reinstated in your place of Lohar, where you will remain in perfect peace and 
quiet with your family without erecting fortifications, digging ditches, rearing 
trees, strong brushwood, or other unnecessary means of defence. All your 
Girass dues that you were in the habit of receiving in the time of the late 
Futteh Sing Rao Baba Saheb you will enjoy the same of long standing, and 
in the due enjoyment of which continue to serve the superior government with 
all fidelity and due attachment; and whereas you have afforded -the required 
securities and counter securities in executing a separate bond, according to 
which you will continue to conduct yourself, in regard to the yearly govern- 
ment dues of the description of ghasdana and jummabundee, and others, you 
will duly pay, according to the peculiar custom of such revenues and the forms 
of the pergunnah. From the time of your flight up to the end of the year of 
1865—1808-9, the Sircar has taken all your Girass dues, and on which account 
up to the same period you are hereby enjoined not to show any hindrance 
thereon. Your Girass dues are yet to be defined, according to which you will 
receive them from the commencement of the year 1866—1809-10, being care- 
ful to avoid any kind of hindrance throughout the country in view to obtain- 
ing more. And whereas in view to your observing such line of conduct as 



92 Mahee Kanta Agency— Petty Chiefs— Ahi/ma—THo. XXXVIII. 



herein provided for^ yOu are allowed the guarantee of Captain James Rivett 
Carnac, Acting Resident, on the part of the Honourable English Company; 
you have also the Sircar's kowls. 

Done Sumvut 1866—1809-10 Kartick Vud, Uh November. 



Moortub 
Soodh. 



On the part of the English East India Company. 



L. S. of Capt. 

J. B. Carnac, 

Acting 

Resident. 



No. XXXVIII. 

Teansiation of a Baeote's Deed of Secukitt granted by Tooebaee Thakooe of Ahyma, 

to the HoNotTEABLE Company. 

Granted to the Honourable Company's Sircar by Dulput Khurshunjee 
Barote of the city of Neriade. Whereas I have of my own free will become 
security for Baria Joorbaee Goolab Sing, of Ahyma, in the Neriade pergun- 
nah, with all his brothers and other relations, and also Gis ryots and Rajpoots, 
Koolees, and sepoys, and all the armed men, with every other kind of ryot 
belonging to his share, as also for all the ryots and others inhabiting Bajee- 
poora ; for all enclosed by the fence and gates, I have become security both 
for good conduct and appearance ; if they shall be guilty of any irregularity 
or disturbance of the peace, or by instigating others to cause such crimes to 
be committed, or shall steal or harbour thieves or other incendiaries, or give 
them any kind of food, or shall permit them to live in the village, and annoy 
any other person, or cause any to be so, or if any horsemen, armed men, or 
others belonging to the village, shall go or come with thieves, on their being 
detected I will answer for it ; if the footsteps of thieves are traced to the 
village, they shall be carried fairly on to the next village ; if the Sircar's 
people come to apprehend them they shall go along with and assist the foot 
or horsemen ; no offender against the Sircar shall be entertained nor shall any 
irregularities be committed within the dominions of the Honourable Com- 
pany, or of their Highnesses the Guikwar and Peishwa, and should any of 
them (inhabitants of Ahyma) be detected in committing any irregularity or 
disturbance I will deliver them up, and should a complaint be made in the 
Adawlut against any person for robbery, murder, or on account of debt or 



Mahee Kanta Agency— Petty Chiefs— Titovee—TSo. XXXIX. 93 



other cause, and a mohsul comes iipon the defendant, he shall go into the 
presence, no one shall obstruct his doing so ; and also, for whatever fields may 
be held in mortgage the money shall be taken and the field released, and of 
such Sircar's ground belonging to this or other villages as may be held by 
sale or mortgage, and cultivated, the urgotee and salamee shall be paid year 
after year ; also no Sircar's land shall be taken either by sale or in mortgage ; 
they will enjoy such Girass or property as may be regularly inherited by them 
and not create any new j in this way I have become perpetual security, and 
whatever answer the Sircar may demand, agreeably to this writing, I will, 
from my own property, make : the above written is true. Joosabhaee Poon- 
jajee, of Kulwar, has become counter security ; for all this, his own property 
also is responsible ; the security and counter security are equally responsible, 
according to the terms of this writing ; the above written is true. 

Sated Sumhut 1867, Weishak Soodh 8rd, corresponding with \ht7t April 
1811. 

(Sd.) DtTLPUT Khurshunjeb. 



Tbanslation of a Deed of Countee Sectjeitt granted by Joosabhaee Thakgoe of 
Ahtma, to the HoNOUEABLE Company, Sumvut 1867, Choitro Vud 13th. 

I, Baria Joosabhaee Poonjajee, inhabitant of Kulwar, with my own 
hand, write that I have become counter security for Baria Joorbaee Goolab 
Sing, of Ahyma, as also all his brothers and relations, and all the ryots of 
his share, and all the armed men, and all inhabitants within his boundaries, 
including people of every sort and description without any kind of exception; 
that ill case the Ahyma Baria Joorbaee, or any other person of his share, 
shall commit any kind of irregularity, or cause any to be committed, I will 
immediately produce them, as also answer for the crime ; for these purposes 
I have become, year after year, perpetual counter security to the government 
of the Honourable Company ; the people of every description inhabitmg his 
Bajeepoora, without any exception, are included in this writing. 

(Sd.) Bakia Joosabhaee Poonjajee. 



No. XXXIX. 

Teansiation of an Ageeement entered into by Kunk;ajee Ghumpavut, Chief of 
TiTOVBEi and his son Lalljee, with Captain William Miles, dated Cheiter Vud 
12th, or 29th April 1821. 

Article 1. 
I engage not to rob or plunder in any part of the country, nor be the 
cause of robbery or plunder, nor will I cause any disturbance. 



94 Mahee Kanta Agency— Petty Chiefs— Tltovee— No. XXXIX. 



AUTICLE 2. 

I engage not to receive or harbour any outlaw or offender from the 
territories of the Honourable Company, the Guikwar, or any other part or 
country, but will seize and deliver up such offender or outlaw without delay 
or excuse. 

Article 3. 

I will not fail to resist persons in opposition to the British Government 
or the Guikwar to the utmost of my power, and will not give theni assist- 
ance in any way, but use my best endeavours to cut off their supplies and 
apprehend them. 

Article 4*. 

I engage not to enter into any quarrels among my br^ethren ox neigh- 
bours, nor will I entertain any foreign troops, as Sindees, Mukranees, 
Arabs, &e. 

Article 5. 

Whatever quarrels may arise between me and my neighbours I will 
submit them to the British Government, and abide by its decision. 

Article 6. 

I engage to protect the passage of merchandize through my limits, and 
to conform to whatever regulations may be made by the British Govern- 
ment respecting the collection of customs or transit duties. 

Article 7. 

I will not allow any trade in opium except that regulated by the orders 
of the British Government. 

Article 8. 

On Margsir Vud ISth, Sumvut 1875, or the 25th December 1818, I 
gave security to the British Government, which is still in force, and I engage 
to conform to the terms of that security and not to deviate from them. 

I have subscribed to the above eight Articles, and will strictly observe 
them. The perpetual security for this engagement is Bharote Khuta, 
Humeei', and Bharote Koosiall Gela, of the town of Etaree, pergunnah 
Morassa ; they will secure the performance of this contract. 

(Sd.) Thakoor Kunkajee Sing. 

and his son Lalljee. 

Securities — Bharote Khuta, Humeer, and Bharote Koosiall Gela. 

Similar engagements were made with the Chiefs of Dhudalia, Bakrole, 
Soorpore, Churunwaree, Mohimpore, and Runnasur. 



Mahee Kanta Agency— Petty Chiefs— XooZees— No. XL. 05 



No. XL. 

Teanslation of the Teems of Sbcueitt taken from Doodhoo Kaunt, the Chief of Gajun 
and his Koolees, dated Bysaok Soodh 7th, 1877, or 6th May 1821. , 

I o£ my own free will do engage to conform to the following Articles :— 

Article 1. 

I engage to pay the amount of jumma due by me to government from 
the year 1875 to 1877, three years. Rupees 4-0 a year, the whole Rupees 120, 

Aeticlb 2. 

From and after the year 1878 the government dues of Gajun shall be 
assessed, agreeable to the produce of the village, by an inspection of the 
crops, &c. 

Article 3. 

I engage to restore all property proved to have been stolen by the Koo- 
lees of my village from the year 1875 to the present day without excuse or 
delay. 

Article 4. 

From this day forward I engage not to rob or plunder in the territories 
of the Honourable Company, the Guikwar, or in any other part or country, 
nor will I cause the commission of any robbery or crime, or cause any disturb- 
ance. I also engage not to be concerned in any matter from which loss may 
result to o-overnment, but answer all demands upon me as a peaceable subject, 
and whenever I am summoned by the officers of government I will attend. 

Article 5. 
I engage not to join any parties of robbers or plunderers, nor will I give 
them the least assistance in any way, and if any thieves should pass by my 
village I will apprehend and deliver them over to government, and will be 
responsible if tliey pass my village ; I will also keep a watch as far as my 
limits extend for this purpose. Also if any offenders against the British 
Government, that of the Guikwar, or any other, should come .to my village or 
its limits I will apprehend them and deliver them up to government. I will 
not associate with thieves to plunder, and if intelligence of the robberies of 
any other village should reach me I will give instant information thereof to 
government, and failing to do so I shall be an offender and answerable for the 
same. 

Article 6. 
I will not cause any hindrance to the passage of merchandize, and will 
protect the roads to the utmost of my power, and should any property be 
stolen in my limits I will produce the thief or answer for the amount. If 
any thief should be traced to my village or limits I will carry on the trace or 
be responsible. 



96 Mahee Kanta Agency— Petty Chiefs— JEboZee*— No. XLI. 



AfiTICLB 7. 

I will make known to government what horses I have, and will only keep 
as many as government shall direct and will sell the rest: i£ I keep more 
horses they b6 seized by governmentj I have no claim to them. 

Article 8. 
I will obey all orders of the thannadar. 

Article 9, 
Besides the above Articles, whatever orders I may receive from govern- 
ment I will obey without fail or fault ; also in demands regarding offences 
whatever orders may be sent by the Adawlut shall be obeyed, and the offend- 
ers given up. 

I will strictly conform to the above nine Articles. 

(Sd.) DooDHOO Kaunt, &c. 

Securities — Bharote Girder, wulud Gulla, of the village of Bhautkooloo. 
Arr zamins or counter security — Khaunt Sahiba, wulud Khoora, and 
Tral FuUa, wulud Soojee, Chiefs of the villages of Wagheria and Malwan. 

A similar engagement was made with the Chief of Autrole. 



No. XLI. 



TijANSLATioN of the Secueity given by the Koolee' Chiefs of Anoeia to the Beitibh 
GovBJiNMENT, 1st Jesht, or 1st June 1821. 

We, the Chiefs and inhabitants of Anoria, do make this agreement with 
the British Government, and furnish security to the following Articles : 

Article 1. 
On the 4th Falgoon 1876, Jemadar Yaroo, kamaisdar of Bejapore, took 
the security of Anoria ; this engagement was forwarded to government, and 
from that day to this all thefts proved to have been committed, or whatever 
injury may have been done by us, shall be answered and satisfaction made 
without demur or excuse. 

Article 3. 
From this day forward we engage not to plunder, rob, or commit acts of 
violence in the Honourable Company's districts, those of the Gaekwar, or any 
other ; nor will we cause any such acts, nor be parties to any violence or injury. 



Mahee Eanta Agency— Petty Chiefs— Koolees— No, XLI. 97 



Article 3. 

We engage not to join any robbers on any pretence whatever, nor will 
we afford them any aid or assistance, and should any enter our limits we 
engage to apprehend them, or should they pass we will be answerable. 

We will keep a guard in our limits, and, should any offenders against the 
British or Guikwar Governments enter our town or pass our limits we will 
seize and deliver him or them up. We will not associate with thieves ; and if 
information of robbery or crime committed by the Koolees of any other 
village reach us, we will declare the same to the Sircar, and failing therein we 
will be held as offenders and answerable. 

AUTICLE 4. 

We engage not to cause any hindrance to the passage of merchandize and 
will provide for the safety of the roads, and if any loss should be sustained in 
our limits we will deliver up the thief or be answerable for the amount. If 
any thief should be traced to our village or limits we will carry on the trace, 
and if we do not we will answer for the loss without delay or excuse. 

Akticle 5. 
We will make known to government whatever horses we may have in our 
village, and will keep only as many as government may direct and sell the rest; 
if we keep more they may be seized by government. 

Article 6. 
We engage to obey the orders of the thannadar. 

Article 7. 

We engage to receive from the Collector or his Agent on the 2nd Pous 
Vud whatever Girass may be due to us in the Honourable Company^s districts, 
and we engage not to demand such Girass from the Patell or cultivators, nor 
cause any expense to them ; and if we act contrary to this we agree to submit 
to such punishment as may be ordered or directed, and also_ to return any 
money so obtained. 

Article 8. 

Two men belonging to the Sircar were murdered by some persons near 
the village of Nowagaum. We engage to search for the murderers, and if 
they be of our village we will deliver them over to the Sircar, or should they 
be discovered by other persons we also engage to give them up. 

In addition to the above Articles we engage to obey all the orders of 
government and to commit no crimes, and in cases of dispute or offence what- 
ever orders may be received from the court of Adawlut shall be obeyed, and 
the offender delivered up. 

We will strictly conform to the above Articles. 

IV 13 



98 Mabee Eanta Agency— Petty Chiefs— s:oolees— No. XIiII. 

Perpetual security^ Mai, fael, and hazir zamin — Bharote, PuthoOj Guma. 
Ditto ditto — Veera Guma, of Prautej, Poonja Pergunnah, Bejapore. 

Arr zamins or counter security — Nathajee Sumbhoorathore and Soot 
Hauttijee, of Mayend ; Khaunt Ojumjee, Nurirjee and Sooltanjee Bhanjee, 
&e., &c., Mohoori; Thakoor Vuktajee Anoopjee, Sungpore; Bhowan Sing 
Sumtajee, Lakeora ; Sewajee Soortajee, Vaugpore. 



No. XLII. 



Teanslation of a Draft for a Settlement of Village Peace, &c., with Secubities and 
CouNTEE Secueities, proposed by LiEtrTENANT-CoLONEL Ballanttne, to be executed 
witb sundry Villages in the district under his charge. 

We (the Chief and his relations of every denomination, all the inhabi- 
tants, whether of the zillah or the town, or its suburbs, or its outskirt 
hamlets, good or -bad, all classes) of our free will and accord pledge ourselves 
to government, under the following Articles of security for good behaviour, 
for appearance on summons, for payment of dues, and additional security for 
the efficiency of the above securities : — 

Article 1. 

We pledge ourselves to be guilty of no irregularities, to lend our counte- 
nance to none, nor to afford any aid, shelter, or protection to people of bad 
character ; and in case of their entering our limits we pledge ourselves to do 
our utmost to apprehend them, that is to say, offenders against the British 
and Guikwar Governments, and deliver them up pursuing them so long as 
they are in our limits in order to apj)i'ehend them. 

Aeticle 2. 

Wherever any zemindar has been deprived by force of lands or villages, 
or been compelled to resign them, the said transactions to be investigated, 
and the lands and villages thus unjustly taken away to be restored, and the 
bonds thus extorted to be cancelled, and for the future no transfer of vil- 
lages or territory is binding unless with the knowledge and approbation 
of government. 

Article 3. 
We pledge ourselves to carry on no intestine disputes of civil discords or 
private hostilities. Our causes of difference to be reported for the decision 
of government, and that decision abided by, and we promise not to entertain 
in our service any armed men of any denomination, whether foreign Arabs, 
or Pathans, or Mukranees, or Rajpoots or Kattees, or Mahrattas. 



Mahee Kanta Agency— Petty Chiefs— ^ooZees— No. XLII. 99 



Article 4. 

"We pledge ourselves neither to raise uor protect gangs of robbers assem- 
bled for the molestation of the British or Guikwar districts, and we will 
afford every assistance in our power of guides and bearers to merchants and 
travellers proceeding through our districts, and guard them and their property, 
and we bind ourselves to answer the losses they may sustain in our limits ; 
and in case of their being robbed we will trace the course of the robbers, and 
either prove that they left our limits or make good the loss. 

Article 5. 

A faithful report shall be made to the Sircar of all the Koolees who 
through our limits keep horses, and those only shall be allowed to keep them 
to whom the Sircar shall grant permission to do so, and the remaining horses 
shall be disposed of as government shall be pleased to direct ; and in case 
of any disobedience under this head we consent to our horses being seized as 
forfeit to government : we will in this matter in no respect depart from the 
wishes of government. 

Article 6, 

The old established claims of ghasdana possessed by the Guikwar govern- 
ment and neighbouring zemindars over our villages shall be faithfully dis- 
charged yearly, and no difficulties shall be started by us, but the whole 
regularly paid. 

Article 7. 
Wherever we possess claim of Girass, vsranta, or produce of land or trees 
upon the villages of the Sircar or of the neighbouring zemindars, or they 
possess such like claims upon-^iis, we pledge ourselves to refer the same to the 
arbitration of the Sircar, binding ourselves to abide by the decision and in 
no way to oppose the wish of government. 

Article 8. 

Whenever any agent of government sent by government; comes to any 
of our villages, we bind ourselves to pay every attention to his instructions, 
and in no way to oppose the wishes of government. 

Article 9. 

The parties stationed by government through the country for the pro- 
tection of the peace shall be assisted by us in every manner in our power, 
and on any alarm of robbers we will join in the pursuit with every individual 
under our control, consulting in every respect the wishes of government. 

Article 10. 
We pledge ourselves to'attendto the regulations of government respecting 
opium in every respect whatever, and to pay the plough tax and land tax 



100 



Mahee Kanta Agency— Petty Chiefs— ^ooZees— Wo. XLII. 



as established by ancient usage, and to whomsover it is due, whether for the 
cultivation of our own lands or on lands rented from other villages, 'to the 
Patells of those villages. 

AUTICLE 11. 

Upon the arrival of merchants and travellers passing through our limits we 
engage to protect their persons and property, and to extort from them nothing 
under the name of custom, tolls, or fees, but what is fixed as due to us by 
government. 

After this manner we pledge ourselves, for oui'selves and our descendants 
for ever, a perpetual agreement, undertaken of our free will and accord, and 
after full deliberation, for ourselves and for our children after us, and the 
undersigned are securities for our due fulfilment of our part of the agreement. 

Particular Statement of the names of the Tillages of Megraj Talooka with 
which the above Agreement was made : — 



m. of 




Names of 


No. of 


Names of 


Ullages. 




Villages. 


Villages. 


Villages. 


1. 


Mouzah Dhulwanee. 


14. Mouzah Bhattuvara. 


a. 




Koonail. 


15. 


, Sahrunpore. 


3. 




Jessodrah. 


16. 


, Lhebodrah Mottah. 


4. 




Raj pore. 


17. 


, Bheemapore. 


5. 




Toomaliah. 


18. 


, Kumrodah. 


6. 




Gundiah. 


19. 


, Peessaal. 


7. 




Lhebodrah. 


20. , 


, Kheroy Dhoodah. 


8. 




Wausnah. 


21. 


, Kuttrah. 


9. 




Bharuj Vulonah. 


22. 


, Bellah. 


10. 




Royniah. 


23. 


, Royawana Soorujderee 


11. 




Oodwah. 


24. , 


, Sulthanah. 


12. 




Dhoodah Motlah. 


25. 


, Sheegaal. 


13. 




Wossoy. 


26. 


, Moolud. 



KATTIAWAR AGENCY. 

Bombay Governmeni Becords, Nos. XXXVII. 8f XXXIX. of new Series, and 
Reports hy the Bombay Government. 

By the 4tli* Article of the definitive Treaty with the Gaekwar of 1805 
it was stipulated that a portion of the subsidiary force should proceed to 
Kattiawar whenever there should be a real necessity for itj the British Govern- 
ment being the judge of the necessity. During the close connection which 
existed between the British Government and the Gaekwar at the beginning of 
the present century, it was soon discovered that a considerable portion of the 
Gaekwar's revenues depended on the realization of the revenues from 
Kattiawar, which were annually collected by a moolkgeeree army. As early 
as 1802 the evils of this system, which was a special characteristic of the 
Mahratta empire, attracted the attention of the British Government. The 
moolkgeeree collections differed from ordinary revenue, inasmuch as they were 
fixed, less with reference to the capabilities of the country, than to the power 
of the government of the day to exact them. They implied on the part of 
the government no examination of the assets of the possessions which paid 
the contribution, but were liable to diminution or to increase in proportion to 
the weakness or the strength of the government ; nevertheless the moolkgeeree 
system was fully recognized in the constitution of the Mahratta empire. In 
almost all the conquests which the Mahrattas made, the first object was money. 
Being peculiarly a military power, the Mahrattas cared not for the institutions 
of civil government except as a means of subsisting their armies. It was only 
after districts had for years been subject to their immediate influence that any 
regular judicial system was attempted, and even then the judicial power was 
almost without exception vested in the ofiicers by whom the revenue was 
collected. Although at first the moolkgeeree system implied but an imperfect 
conquest, it came in time to be regulated by fixed rules and customs. For 
example, unless the subject provinces rebelled against the supreme authority, 
the Mahrattas took little pains to preserve the peace of the country; every 
petty landholder made peace or war with his neighbour as he pleased, provided 
the results of quarrel were not troublesome or inconvenient to the superior 
power ; but it was an established rule that all internal disputes should cease 
as soon as the moolkgeeree army made its appearance on circuit, and that the 
troops of the dependent Chiefs should retire into their forts. The exactions 



* See page 218. 



102 Kattiawar Agency. 



of the moolkgeeree army also were directed cbiefly against property — never 
against persons, unless the demands of the government were resisted. If a 
Chief settled with the government before the army entered his estates, he was 
secure from oppression, but if he resisted, the whole open country was put 
under forcible contribution. As the moolkgeeree expeditions began to be 
undertaken with greater regularity, the contributions were increased, till 
eventually Mahratta establishments were introduced into the country. In 
this way the Gaekwar had established himself at Lathee, Amrelee, Luktur, 
Palitana, and other places in Kattiawar, principally in the districts bordering 
on his substantive possessions in Guzerat. 

Two very obvious evils were inseparable from this system, to neither 
of which could the British Government lend its countenance. In the first 
place there being no civil government, the country was desolated by the 
intestine feuds of the petty landholders, and in the next place, the injury 
done to the country by the moolkgeeree army was out of all proportion 
greater than the revenue realized. When, therefore, the British Government 
associated itself with the Gaekwar in enforcing the rights of the Gaekwar 
in Kattiawar, it placed before itself two objects to be attained, — 1st, the 
maintenance of tranquillity in the country ; and 2nd, the commutation of 
the variable and generally increasing collections made by the Gaekwar to a 
fixed money payment to be made annually without the necessity of the 
periodical advance of an army. Further than this it was not proposed to 
interfere with the rights and powers formerly enjoyed by the Chiefs and 
landholders, or the rights of the Gaekwar. In the districts ceded to the 
British Government by the Peishwa and the Gaekwar in 1802-3, the same 
system of moolkgeeree collection, with comparative independence of the 
landholders, was found to exist, more especially in Gogo, Dundooka, Ranpore, 
and Dholka. But the enforcement of British laws has long since obliterated 
the powers of the Chiefs in these districts. In Kattiawar, on the other hand, 
the engagements which it was the policy of the day to conclude while as yet 
the province was under the Peishwa and the Gaekwar, have stereotyped the 
state of things then existing, and have prevented the assimilation of the 
administration in Kattiawar with that of provinces whicli came earlier under 
British influence. 

In December 1803 the Chiefs of Cheetul, Jeitpore, Koondala, Joriabunder, 
and Morvee applied for British protection, and offered, on certain conditions, 



Kattiawar Agency. 



103 



to cede their estates to the British Government ; but as the rights of all parties 
in Kattiawar were unknown, and no specific arrangement had been framed 
with the Gaekwar's governmentj the offer was not accepted. In 1807 the joint 
forces of the British Government and the Gaekwar advanced to Kattiawar. 
Before entering the country, circular letters were addressed by Colonel Walker, 
Resident at Baroda, and the Gaekwai-, to twenty-nine* of the principal Chiefs, 
explaining to them the object which government had in view. The intention 
of the British Government was in many cases misunderstood. Some Chiefs 
believed that moolkgeeree collections were to be levied on account of the 
British Government, and others, supposing that the intention was to supplant 
the rights of the Gaekwar, made open assurances of their dependence on the 
British. With little difficulty these misunderstandings were removed, and the 
Chiefs readily entered into the engagements proposed to them. But from the 
peculiar tenure of property in Kattiawar, the number of engagements con- 
cluded, instead of being 29 only as at first supposed, amounted to no fewer 
than 153; t and this number was afterwards largely increased as deserted 
estates became settled. In Kattiawar, except among the leading Rajpoot 
families, the property of the father is subdivided among the sons, and the 
subdivision becomes more complete as the families descend in the scale of 
wealth and importance. No families of the first or second class divide, nor do 



In Jlialawar 
In Gohelwar 
In Hallar, &c. 



9 

4 
16 



f Colonel Walker in his reports mentions 192 States, but he made revenue settlements of 153 
only, viz. •■ — 





Mentioned. 


Settled. 


Jhalawar 

Muchoo Kanta ... 

Gohelwar 

Burda 

Soruth 

Hallar 

Kattiawar Proper 


49 
2 

31 
1 
6 

35 

68 


48 
1 

29 
1 
3 

32 

39 


Total 


192 


153 



There are no authentic lists of the Chiefs with whom the engagements were made, except 
the Schedules attached to Colonel Walter's reports. The list given at page 232 of Mr. Hughes 
Thomas's collection of Treaties is incorrect, and appears to have heen borrowed from a list of the 
Kattiawar Chiefs submitted to the Bombay Government in 1842. Column 6 of the statement 
which forms Appendix No. I. indicates those of the Kattiawar States with which Colonel Walker 
made engagements, which remain to this day and have not been absorbed in other States. 



104 Kattiawar Agency. 



the leading Rajpoots of the third class ; but among the small proprietors the 
practice is all but universal, the eldest son in some cases receiving the largest 
share, and enjoying certain privileges as the head of the family. The posses- 
sors of these shares and their descendants are called the Bliayad or brother- 
hood of the principal Chief. They claim the same powers in their estates as 
the Chief, paying their c6ntributioa of the general collections made in the 
country, and frequently claiming the right of a separate settlement of their 
own account. There is another class called Moolgirassias or original owners of 
villages, who had come to terms with the Chiefs who had established sway 
over them, and by surrendering a portion of their lands had retained the 
remainder in Girass or hereditary landed property subject to the conditions of 
military service and tribute, from all such as could establish their right to a 
separate settlement, separate agreements were taken. 

The permanent Engagements (No. XLIII.) concluded were of two 
kinds,* for each of which separate security was taken. The first engagement 
was Pa'el Zamin, providing for the general peace of the country and the pro- 
tection of the possessions of the British Government, the Peishwa, and the 
Gaekwar. This engagement was signed by the Bhatf of the Chief, and for 
the faithful performance of its terms counter-security or Arr Zamin was taken 
from some other Chief, so as to establish a chain of responsibility, making each 
Chief answerable for his neighbour. The second engagement was for the pay- 
ment of a fixed revenue in perpetuity, for which was given security renewable 
after ten years. When the Chiefs paid no revenue to the Gaekwar, the engage- 
ment of the first kind only was taken. After these engagements were concluded, 
a Memorandum (No. XLIV.) of the engagement was given to each Chief 
under the guarantee of the British Government. The settlements made in 1807 
were based upon the state of things existing at the time, and this is the period 
to which all enquiries in disputes regarding landed possessions or hereditary 
rights in Kattiawar are limited. The aggregate amount of revenue fixed at 
these settlements in perpetuity was equivalent to Government Rupees 9,07,415. 

It is a singular fact that in all these arrangements the rights of the 
Peishwa in Kattiawar were overlooked. To the major part of the Kattiawar 



* Besides these a document called Hat Salamnee was sometimes taken. This was a prelimi- 
nary obligation to contract certain engagements. It was always cancelled and returned to the 
Chief when the permanent engagements were signed. 

_+ The Bhats or bards are a class of people highly respected by Eajpoots. Their persons iire 
considered sacred, and hence they are commonly employed as sureties. 



Kattiawar Agency. io5 



revenues the Gaekwai- was entitled, not in bis own right, but in his capacity 
of farmer for the Peishwa. Yet the engagements concluded were drawn up 
solely inj;he Gaekwar's name. The Peishwa's consent to the settlement of 
bis revenues in perpetuity was never asked, nor was he even informed of what 
had been done till 1814, after the Gaekwar's lease had expired, and the 
disputes arose* between the Peishwa and the Gaekwar, which ended in the 
murder of Gungadhur Shastree, when the British Resident at Poona delivered 
a draft engagementf to the Peishwa, explaining the nature of the engage- 
ments which had been made, and requiring him to respect them. 

Bub in this draft engagement the serious mistake was made of describing 
the engagements as settlements for ten years, whereas the collateral security 
bond only was renewable after ten years , the settlements were in perpetuity. 
To this draft engagement the Peishwa did not agree, and he presented 
another-j- to be substituted for it. Besides these, several other proposed 
engagements were exchanged in the course of the negotiations, but no final 
agreement was ever come to. The discussions with the Peishwa, however, 
were ended by the Treaty of 1817 by the 7th Article,^ of which he ceded 
to the British Government all his rights in Kattiawar; and since the agree- 
ment§ in 1820 with the Gaekwar, by which he engaged to send no troops 
into Kattiawar and to make no demands on the province except through the 
British Government, the supreme authority in Kattiawar has been vested in the 
British Government alone, firstly, in its own share acquired under the Treaty 
of 1817, and secondly, in the Gaekwar's share by virtue of the above agree- 
ment. In the districts known as the Panch Mehals,|| however, which had 
come under the direct rule of the Gaekwar, and in Okhamundul, which, after 
its conquest by the British Government, was ceded to the Gaekwar by the 
7th Article of the Treaty If of 6th November 1817, the internal management 
is conducted by the ofiicers of the Gaekwar. 

It was soon discovered that the Kattiawar Chiefs, partly from their pecu- 
niary embarrassments and partly from their weakness and the subdivision of 



* See page 181. t See Vol. V., page 67. 

t Appendix No. II. § See page 235. 

il Amrelee, Dharee, and Danturwas, in the Kattiawar division ; Korinar in Soruth ; and 
Dapinuggur in Qohelwar 

T See page 229. 

IV 14 



106 Kattiawar Agency. 



their jurisdictions, were incapable of acting up to the engagements which 
bound them to preserve the peace of the country and suppress crime. On 
the other hand, the British Government was fettered in its efforts.to effect 
an improvement in the administration by these very engagements which it 
had mediated when the country was under the authority of the- Peishwa and 
the Gaekwar, and when the substitution of the direct control of the British 
supremacy for that of the native governments had not been contemplated. 
These engagements, besides considerations of financial and political expediency, 
prevented the subjection of the Chiefs to ordinary British rule, and no course 
of reform was left open save to introduce a special authority suited to the 
obligations of the British Government, the actual condition of the country, 
and the usages and character of its inhabitants. Inquiries which had been 
instituted in 1825 showed that the Kattiawar Chiefs believed the sovereignty 
of the country to reside in the power to whom they paid tribute ; that before 
the British Government assumed the supreme authority, the Gaekwar had the 
right of interfering to settle disputed successions, to punish offenders seized 
in Chiefships of which they were not subjects, to seize and punish indis- 
criminate plunderers, to coerce Chiefs who disturbed the general peace, and 
to interfere in cases of flagrant abuse of power or notorious disorder in the 
internal government of the Chiefs. Based, therefore, upon these rights of the 
supreme power, the British Government, in 1831, established a criminal court 
of justice in Kattiawar, to be presided over by the Political Agent aided by three 
or four Chiefs as assessors, for the trial of capital crimes in the estates of Chiefs 
who were too weak to punish such offences, and of crimes committed by petty 
Chiefs upon one another, or otherwise than in the legitimate exercise of authority 
over their own dependants ; but with this exception no magisterial interference 
in the administration of the territories subject to the various Chiefs was 
exercised by the Political Agent. 

N"otwithstanding these efforts to reform the administration of Kattiawar, 
there was little improvement in the condition of the country. The social 
and political system of Kattiawar was described as a system of sanguinary 
boundary disputes, murders, robbery, abduction, arson, and self-outlawry. 
Upwards of two hundred persons were said to have voluntarily made themselves 
outlaws and to subsist professedly by depredation. Although about eighty 
of the petty States which existed in 1807 had been absorbed in other States, 
yet, from the constant subdivision of possessions by inheritance, the number 



Kattiawar Agency. 



107 



of separate jurisdictions* rose to four hundred and eighteen, and in the 
majority of these the jurisdiction claimed was over two villages, one village, 
and often over a fraction of a village. 

In 1863 the administration was reorganized by arranging in seven classes 
all the Chiefs of Kattiawar, and defining their powers and the extent of their 
jurisdiction. The country was divided into four districts or prants, correspond- 
ing with the ancient divisionsf of Kattiawar, and European officers were 
appointed to these districts to superintend the administration generally, and 
more particularly to try interjurisdictional eases and offenders who had no 
known Chief, or who were under such petty landholders as might be unable to 
bring them to trial. 

There are four Chiefs in Kattiawar, viz., Joonagurh, Nowanuggur, Bhow- 
nuggur, and Drangdra, who exercise first class jurisdiction, that is to say, 
have power to try for capital offences, without permission from the Political 
Agent, any persons except British subjects; and eight, viz., Wankaneer, 
Morvee, Rajkot, Gondul, Dhrol, Limree, Wadwan, and Palitana, who exercise 
second class jurisdiction, that is to say, have power to try for capital offences, 
without permission of the Political Agent, their own subjects only : the 
others have powers more or less restricted according to their class. As a rule 
there is no appeal from the decisions of the Chiefs, but their proceedings 
may be called for and reviewed on suspicion of injustice. The Political 
Assistants have the civil powers of zillali judges and the criminal powers 
of district magistrates. Appeals lie from their decisions to the Political 
Agent, but in civil cases the right of appeal has of late been somewhat 
restricted. Each Political Assistant in charge of a prant has an Assistant 



* In Jhalawar 


In Kattiawar Ptoper 


In Muchoo Kanta 


In Halar 


In Soruth, 


In Burda 


In Gohelwar 


In Oond Surwya 


In Babriawar 


t Jhalawar 


Gohelwar 


Sorath 


Halar 



Total 





102 




151 




2 




47 




7 




1 




51 




37 




20 


... 


418 


North. 
East. 




South. 




West. 





108 Kattiawar Agency. 



subordinate to him who resides at the head-quarterg of the prantj and has 
civil and criminal powers up to a fixed limit. There are also a certain numher 
o£ subdivisional thanadars in each prantj each of whom is invested with 
lower civil and criminal powers over a cluster of villages contiguous to his 
thana, but with no responsibility for police. 

In these arrangements no special provision was made for the hearing of 
Girass eases, or those in which landed estates held on a semi-feudal tenure were 
involved. If a case fell within the jurisdiction of a Chief it was heard by 
him, if it fell beyond his jurisdiction it was heard by the Political Assistant, 
but it was not the practice to interfere in eases which a Chiei in virtue of 
bis jurisdiction was competent to hear. The efEect of this was to deprive 
the Moolgirassias of the right of appeal against their Chiefs, and in 1867 it 
was decided by the Home authorities that the Moolgirassias were entitled to 
look to the British Government for an enforcement of the obligation which 
the Chiefs undertook in the Fa'el Zamin bond of 1807 not to seize the 
lands of another. 

To give effect to these views it was at first proposed that Girass cases 
should be heard by a court composed of a Judicial Assistant to the Political 
Agent assisted by the karbharis of the Chiefs as assessors. This arrangement 
however was viewed with disfavour by the Chiefs, and, after much discussion 
during which the Chiefs were allowed every opportunity of representing 
their views, a scheme was introduced experimentally providing for the survey 
of the estates and settlement of the right in land of the subordinate Moolgiras- 
sias, and for the establishment of a Rajasthanik Sabha court for the decision of 
questions in dispute between Moolgirassias and Bhayads on the one hand, and 
the Chiefs on the other. The court is composed of a British officer as president, 
and six members who are chosen by Government out of a list of twelve 
names submitted by the Chiefs. Of these si:^ members the president chooses 
two to sit with him as assessors, and either party to a dispute has a right of 
objecting to one of the members. Rules (No. XLV.) have been drawn up 
for the working of the court. 

For many years the southern districts of Kattiawar were exposed to the 
depredations of bands of Waghers who plundered the Gaekwar's Mehals and 
created a wide spread feeling of alarm throughout Kattiawar. In 1867 a 
large band of these outlaws attacked and plundered several villages in the 



Eattiawar Agency. 109 



vicinity of Eajkotj killed and wounded upwards of seventy persons and 
carried off property valued at. two lakhs of rupees. A small British force 
was despatched against them and with the loss of two officers, completely 
defeated them near Machurda in the territory of the Jam of Nowanuggur. 
To assist the Chiefs in the maintenance of order the formation of a local 
corps composed of contingents from several of the first class States under the 
control of two British officers was sanctioned in March 1867 with the title of 
Federal Seebundy of the Kattiawar States. In May 1868 the remainder of 
the Wagher band was destroyed by a party of this corps. 

In 1873 special measures had to be adopted to repress the excesses 
committed by outlaws, and a British officer was appointed with the consent 
and at the expense of the States to the duty of moving through the various 
jurisdictions with a small body of horse in pursuit of offenders. The cost of 
this measure which was sanctioned for three years is Rupees 18,000 per annum. 

Each State in Kattiawar keeps up its own police and is responsible for 
the preservation of order ; in order to secure due co-operation in the repression 
of crime it was arranged that the police of any State should be allowed to 
enter the territory of another to effect a capture provided they communicate 
at once with the officials, and the same privilege was granted with reference 
to British districts. These measures combined with an improvement in the 
villao-e police have resulted in a marked diminution of crime. 

In 1871 the Kajkoomar College was established for the education of the 
sons of the Chiefs and nobles of Kattiawar. 

The area under the Kattiawar agency is 22,000 square miles ; the popu- 
lation is estimated at 2^ millions ; the gross income of the Chiefs has been 
stated to be Rupees 86,52,700, but is probably considerably above a crore of 
Rupees; the tribute and other collections realized in 1862 were Rupees 
11,81,140, of which Rupees 7,23,370 were collected for the British Govern- 
ment, Rupees 3,10,000 for the Gaekwar, Rupees 64,500 for the Nawab of 
Joonagurh, and Rupees 83,270 for local funds. 

The investigations which were made at the settlement in 1807 revealed 
the fact that the Rajpoot tribes in Kattiawar, more particularly the Jharejas 
and Jetwas, were distinguished by the barbarous practice of female infanti- 
cide. Mr. Duncan, the Governor of Bombay, who some years before, when 



110 Kattiawar Agency. 



in charge of the province of Benares, had induced a caste called Rajkoomars 
to put a stop to this usage, instructed Colonel Walker to endeavour to induce 
the principal Chiefs in Kattiawar to hind themselves and their followers to 
renounce the crime. With much difficulty Colonel Walker succeeded in 
persuading twenty Chiefs and their Bhayad, including every Jhareja Chief 
who enjoyed the smallest separate jurisdiction, to sign an Engagement 
(No. XLVI.) binding themselves under penalties to prohibit infanticide and 
giving the British Government and the Gaekwar the right to punish offenders. 
The engagement comprised within its obligation every Jhareja family inhabit- 
ing the peninsula of Guzei-at. It was first signed by the Chief of Gondul 
and last by the Jam of Nowanuggur. In consequence of violations of this 
agreement, two Chiefs were subsequently required to renew it — the Jam of 
Nowanuggur in 1812 (No. XLVII.), and the Chief of Eajkot in 1835 
(No. XLVIII.). The latter Chief was fined Rupees 12,000 for breach of his 
engagement, and by the new agreement, for which he had to furnish two 
securities, he was required to inform the Political Agent in Kattiawar of any 
expected birth in- his family. 

Shortly after the conclusion of the settlement of Kattiawar, Colonel 
Walker left India, and the subject of infanticide was for some years lost sight 
of. Attention was again directed to it, however, in 1817, when it was found 
that between December 1808 and June 1817 sixty- three female infants had 
been rescued from murder. In July 1824 the number had increased to 
266. In 1825 the infanticide fund was established. This fund is composed 
of mohsulee collections, and of all fines under Rupees 20,000 imposed upon 
Chiefs for breaches of the peace or other misconduct, which may not be paid 
to sufferers on whose account the fine may have been levied. From this fund 
assistance is given to poor Jharejas and others in defraying the expenses of the 
marriage of their daughters, and rewards are distributed to such as may 
merit them by their efforts in rescuing female children from destruction or 
in bringing offenders to detection. 

The British Government in 1834 issued a proclamation to all the 
Kattiawar Chiefs, reminding them of their engagements, and declaring the 
intention of punishing persons guilty of infanticide in such manner as might 
be deemed most expedient and conducive to the complete suppression of the 
practice. The proclamation was renewed in 1838, and further measures were 
taken to remove the causes which lead to infanticide by inducing the Chiefs 



Kattiawar Agency— Okhamundul. Ill 

of other Rajpoot tribes not to give their daughters to any tribe who will not 
give their daughters in return ; by diminishing the expenses at marriagesj &c. 
These measures^ backed by the persevering efforts of the officers of the British 
Government, have been attended with the most successful results. 

Engagements have also been entered into by the Kattiawar Chiefs 
generally, binding themselves to buy opium at the warehouse of the British 
Government, to prevent smuggling, and to intercept all opium not covered 
by a regular passport. These Engagements (No. XLIX.) were concluded in 
1820-21, 

In 1854 the Kattiawar Chiefs engaged to suppress the adulteration of 
cotton practised by traders within their districts and in 1864 agreed to 
abolish transit duties. 

Besides the general engagements above noted, agreements have at 
different times been concluded between the British Government and the 
following Chiefs : — 

Chiefs of OJchamundul. — The district of Okhamundul, in the extreme 
west of Kattiawar, is occupied by Wadhil Rajpoots and Wagbers, a mixed 
race of Mahomedans and Hindoos. The first intercourse of the British 
Government with these tribes was occasioned by their notorious piracy. They 
subsisted chiefly by , the fruits of their piracy and by the offerings of the 
numerous pilgrims attracted to the celebrated shrines of Beyt and Dwarka; 
and the superstitious reverence attaching to these temples prevented neigh- 
bouring States from prosecuting operations against them. When Colonel 
Walker entered Kattiawar in 1807, he was instructed to negotiate agreements 
with the Chiefs of Okhamundul with a view to the suppression of piracy, not 
only with respect to British ships, but the ships of Native States. The four 
Chiefs with whom Engagements (No. L.) were concluded were the Chiefs 
of Beyt, Aramra, Dwarka, Dhingey, and Positra. The C/hiefs of Beyt 
and Aramra were also required to pay Rupees 1,10,000 as compensation for 
injuries occasioned by their piracies. 

The repeated violations of these engagements and the renewed piracies 
committed by the Chiefs compelled the British Government to take possession 
of the country. Okhamundul was conquered in 1816, and was ceded in full 
sovereignty to the Gaekwar by the 7th Article of the Treaty of 6th 
November 1817. 



112 Kattiawar Agency— Joonagurh. 

Joonagurh. — This State is situated in the Soruth district of Kattiawar, 
which was governed by Rajpoot Rajahs of the Choorasama tribe till its con- 
quest by Mahomed Begra, king of Guzerat^ in 1476^ from which time it has 
been subject to Mahomedan Chiefs. The present family of Joonagurh was 
founded in 1735 by Sher Khan Babee, a soldier of fortune, who possessed 
himself of the country and expelled the Mogul deputies. He was succeeded 
by his son, Salabut Khan, who divided his possessions among his sons, 
assigning Joonagurh to Bahadoor Khan, and Bantwa to his two other sons, 
Dillut Khan and Zaman Khan. 

Bahadoor Khan was succeeded in Joonagurh by his son, Mohubut Khan, 
and he, in 1775, by his son, Hamed Khan, then a boy of thirteen, who main- 
tained himself in power by intrigue and crime through a very troublesome and 
stormy rule, and was in possession at the time when Colonel Walker made the 
first settlement of Kattiawar. In addition to the engagements which were 
taken from the Nawab of Joonagurh in common with the other Chiefs of 
Kattiawar then under the authority of the Gaekwar, the Nawab was required 
to make similar agreements with his dependants, from whom he exacted 
collections under the name of zortulbee. This is stated to be a tax imposed 
in the year 1760. In 1822 the British Government interfered to regulate its 
collection ; the amount was ascertained, and the British Government under- 
took to realize it on condition (No. LI.) of receiving one-fourth of the 
amount for the expenses of collection. 

In 1808 Hamed Khan entered into an Engagement (No. LII.) re- 
nouncing piracy and all right to wrecks. He died in 1811, and the succes- 
sion was disputed by his two sons, Bahadoor Khan and Salabut Khan. Even- 
tually Bahadoor Khan was recognized, but he was kept in restraint by an 
Arab Jemadar named Umr Mokassum. From this thraldom he was released 
in 1816 by the interference of the British Government, in return for which 
service the Nawab agreed (No. LIII.) to pay the expenses of the British 
force, to give up his moolkgeeree claims in the British districts of Dundooka, 
Ranpore, Gogo, and Dhollerah, and to cede the revenues of certain villages for 
the expenses of a British agency. The territorial cession, however, was not 
accepted. The Joonagurh Nawab has also other Engagements (No. LIV.) 
to prohibit suttee, and (Nos. LV. and LXIV.) to exempt from duty vessels 
entering his ports from stress of weather. In 1873 this exemption was 
extended (No. XI.) to vessels belonging to the Rao of Kutch. 



Kattiawar Agency— Nowanuggur. 113 

Bahadoor Khan died in 1840, and was succeeded by his son, Hamed Khan, 
who died in 1851, and was succeeded by his brother, Mohubut Khan, the 
present Nawab, now thirty-eight years of age. He has re3eived the assurance 
(No. XXIII.) that any succession to his State which may be legitimate accord- 
ing to Mahomedan law will be upheld. 

The Nawab has a son, Bahadoor Khan, who was recognized by the British 
Government in 1866 as the heir to the Joonagurh State. Claims were 
advanced by the Nawab of IRadhunpore on behalf of a reputed son by his 
daughter, Kamal Bukhta, the first wife of the Nawab of Joonagurh, whom 
the latter had always refused to acknowledge. After a full consideration of 
the ease Government pronounced in favour of Bahadoor Khan. The Nawab 
is a Knight Commander of the Most Exalted Order of the Star of India. 

In 1874< the Joonagurh State entered into an Agreement (No. LVI.) 
for the construction of a line of telegraph. 

The gross revenues of Joonagurh are about Rupees 15,00,000, and the 
State pays to the British Government Rupees 28,324, and to the Gaekwar 
Rupees 36,413. The population numbers 380,921 souls. The military force 
of the State consists of 2 field and 6 other guns, 14 artillerymen, 1,270 cavalry, 
and 3^750 infantry and police. 

The Nawab of Joonagurh is entitled to a salute of eleven guns. 

Nowanuggm — The Chief of this State, which is in the Halar district of 
Kattiawar, is a Jhareja Rajpoot of the same family as the Raos of Kutch 
and has a large Bhayad, of whom the most important and powerful are the 
Chiefs of Gondul, Rajkot, Dhrol and Morvee. These Chiefs, however, have 
long since disused the name of Bhayad, and consider themselves as heads of 
families with a Bhayad of their own. The family emigrated from Kutch to 
Kattiawar and founded Nowanuggur about the year 1442, driving before 
them the Jetwa family, who formerly possessed the country, but who are now 
confined to the small State of Porebunder. 

In 1808 an Engagement* (No. LVII.) was made with the Jam, by 
which he renounced piracy and all right to wrecks. In 1811 the turbulence of 
the Jam made it necessary for the British Government to reduce him by force. 

* A similar engagement was made witTi the CJiief of Joriabundur, which originally formed 
a part of Nowanuggfir, but was separated from it before the settlement of Kattiawar. Nowanug- 
gur was virtually governed by Meroo Khawass, a man of low origin, but considerable ability, from 
1760 till his death in 1800. He received from the Jam the grant of Joriabundur, Balumba, and 
Amrun. The last of these places is still in possession of his descendants as a dependency of Nowa- 
nuggur, but Joriabundur and Balumba were restored to the Jam in 1815 in consequence of the 
Chief being implicated in the rebellion of some Arabs in the Jam's service. 

IV 15 



114 Kattiawar Agency— Bhownuggur. 

He refused to settle heavy pecuniary claims whieli the Rao of Kutch had 
against him for military assistance rendered in time of danger; he ejected from 
his State the Agent of the British Government^ who was making enquiries 
regarding the prevalence of infanticide; and made preparations to assert 
his independence by inducing other Chiefs to combine against the paramount 
power. A force was therefore marched against him^ and on 23rd February 
1812j after much evasion^ he agreed to terms of submission (No. LVIII.). 
He was also required to conclude a fresh Engagement (No. XLVII.) to 
prevent infanticide. 

Engagements exempting from duty vessels entering his ports from stress 
of weather were executed by the Jam of Nowanuggurin 1846 and 1849 (Nos. 
LIX. and LXIV.). This exemption was extended (No. XI.) in 1873 to vessels 
belonging to the E,ao of Kutch. 

The present Jam, Veebajee, is the son of Ranmuljee, who was the nephew 
of Jam Sutwajee and was adopted by him in 1814. He has received a Sunnud 
(No. XVIII.) guaranteeing to him the privilege of adoption. He is forty-nine 
years of age. The gross revenues of the State amount to about Rupees 
15,00,000. The Jam pays annually to the British Government Rupees 50,312, 
to the Gaekwar Rupees 64,183, and to the Nawab of Joonagurh Rupees 4,843. 
The population is 290,847 souls. The military force of the State consists of 
10 field and 75 other guns, 1,050 cavalry, and 4,080 infantry and police. 

The Jam of Nowanuggur is entitled to a salute of eleven guns. 

Bhownuggur. — The Thakoor of Bhownuggur belongs to the tribe of 
Gohel Rajpoots. This tribe are said to have settled themselves in the country 
about the year 1200 under their Chief Sejek, from whose three sons, 
Ranojee, Sarunjee, and Shajee, are descended, respectively, the Chiefs of 
Bhownuggur, Lathee, and Palitana. The Wala State also is an ofEshoot 
from Bhownuggur. The town of Bhownuggur was founded in 1742 by 
Bhow Sing, grandfather of Wukut Sing, who succeeded to the Chieftaincy 
in 1772, and was in possession at the time of Walker's settlements. Bhow 
Sing, his son, Rawul Akerajee, and his grandson, Wukut Sing, took great 
pains to improve the trade of their country an^ to destroy the pirates* who 

* It is uncertain whether the Chief of Bhownuggur signed the general engagement to 
suppress piracy which was concluded in 1808 with other Chiefs of Kattiawar. His hostility to 
the pirates was probably too well known to make any engagement on the subject with him 
necessary. The engagement given at page 62 of Mr. Hughes Thomas's collection of Treaties as 
having been made with Bhownuggur was made with Jam Jessajee of Nowanuggnr, aud not with 
the Eawul of Bhownuggur. 



Kattiawar Agency— Bhownuggur. 115 

infested the neighbouring seaSj which led to a very intimate connection 
between Bhownuggur and the Bombay Government. In 1759 the British 
Government acquired a right to a fourth share of the customs of the port of 
Bhownuggur from the Seedee of Surat, to whom it had been granted by 
Bhow Sing as the price of protection from the enmity of the Nawab of 
Cambay. In 1771 Rawul Akerajee assisted the Bombay Government in 
reducing Tarraja and Mowa, which were occupied by piratical Koolies. After 
the conquest of Tarrajaj the fort was offered to Akerajee by the Bombay 
Government, but he refused to accept it, and it was in consequence made over 
to the Nawab of Cambay. Wukut Sing^ how;^v^r, after his accession, dis- 
possessed the Nawab of the fort, which, under an Engagement ( No. LX.) 
mediated by the British Government in 1773, he was allowed to retain on 
paying a sum of Rupees 75,000. The boundaries of the Bhownuggur State 
were largely increased by various other acquisitions made by Wukut Sing 
previous to the settlement of Kattiawar. 

When Guzerat and Kattiawar were divided between the Peishwa and the 
Gaekwar, the western and larger portion of the Thakoor's possessions were 
included in the Gaekwar^s share, and the eastern and smaller portion, including 
Bhownuggur and the original estates of the family in Sehore, fell to the 
Peishwa, and formed part of the districts of Dundooka and Gogo, which the 
Peishwa ceded to the British Government under the Treaty of Bassein. At 
the time of the settlement of Kattiawar, therefore, part of the Bhownuggur 
possessions had already become British territory, while part remained under 
the Gaekwar. The revenue demanded from the British portion was Rupees 
11,651, and that payable to the Gaekwar was fixed at Rupees 74,500. But 
as it was expedient to consolidate in the hands of the British Government the 
various claims over Bhownuggur, an Agreement (No. LXI.) was made with 
the Thakoor's consent for the transfer of the Gaekwar's revenue in Bhow- 
nuggur to the British Government, which was accordingly included in the 
additional cessions made in 1807 by the Gaekwar for the support of a con- 
tingent force. 

In 1839 the British Government suppressed the mint at Bhownuggur, 
where copper money had previously been coined. As compensation for this a 
sum of Rupees 2,793-6-5 a year was granted to the Thakoor. A further sum 
of Rupees 4,000 was given him in consideration of his resigning all claims 
to share in the land or sea customs of Gogo. These sums are now annually 



116 Kattiawar Agency— Bhownuggur. 

paid under an Agreement (No. LXII.) concluded on 8th September 1840. 
The Rawul also subscribed the usual Engagements (Nos. LXIII. and LXIV.), 
exempting from duty vessels putting into his ports from stress of weather. 
The exemption was extended (No. XI.) in 1873 to vessels belonging to the 
Rao of Kutcb. 

After the cession of Dundooka and Gogo, the Rawul of Bhownuggur, 
in consideration of his iDfiuence and good government, was tacitly permitted 
to exercise the same powers as before in the portion of his estates which fell 
within these districts. But in consequence of a serious abuse of power, the 
Rawul was, in 1815, declared to be amenable to the same measures within his 
British estates as were applied to the other cessions acquired in 1802. His 
British estates were brought under the jurisdiction of the British courts, and 
the revenue payable by him was raised. By these measures the Chief was 
placed in an anomalous position very irritating to him. In his Kattiawar 
estates he continued to exercise his former powers, paying a fixed revenue, 
while in his British estates, including his two largest towns and his place of 
residence, he was subject to ordinary British laws. The Rawul never ceased 
to complain of this and to bring forward many claims against -the British 
Government. These claims were all carefully enquired into in 1859, and an 
Agreement (No. LXy.) was concluded on 23rd October 1860, by which the 
Thakoor's revenue in his British estates was fixed at Rupees 52,000 in perpe- 
tuity and his other claims were adjusted. It was at the same time proposed to 
place the town of Bhownuggur and its subordinate village of Wudwa, 
with the town of Sehore, and ten other villages which formed the old 
possessions of the family, on the same footing as the estates in Kattiawar; 
but owing to some doubts as to the precise status of Kattiawar with respect 
to British laws, this was not at the time effected. 

In January 1866 the Bombay Government issued a notification whereby 
in accordance with the agreement of 1860 certain villages belonging to the 
Chief of Bhownuggur and situated in the Ahmedabad pergunnahs of Dun- 
dooka, Ranpore, and Gogo were declared to be removed from the 1st February 
1866 from the jurisdiction of the revenue, civil, and criminal courts of the 
Bombay Presidency, and transferred to the supervision of the Political Agency 
in Kattiawar on the same conditions as to jurisdiction as the villages of the 
talooka of the Chief heretofore in that province. Doubts have since 
been raised as to the legal effect of these proceedings and the steps which 



Kattiawar Agency— Porebunder. 117 

it may be necessary to adopt with the view of solving such doubts are 
under consideration. 

Eawul Wukut Sing was succeeded in 1816 by his son, Wijeh Sing, and 
he, in 1828, by his son, Akerajee, who died in 1864. Rawul Akerajee was 
succeeded by his brother, Jeswunt Sing, who received a Sunnud (No. XVIII.) 
guaranteeing to him the privilege of adoption. 

Jeswunt Sing died in April 1870, when the succession of his son, Tukht 
Sing, now seventeen years of age, was recognized. During his minority the 
State is managed by joint administrators, one of whom is a British officer, 
and the other the former minister of the State. 

In 1873 the Bhownuggnr State entered into an Agreement (No. LXVI.) 
for the construction of a line of telegraph. 

The State contains 543 villages. The population is 403,754, the revenue 
of the Chief is about Rupees 25,00,000. He pays annually to the British 
Government Rupees 1,30,000. 

The Thakoor of Bhownuggur is entitled to a salute of eleven guns. The 
military force of the State is 17 guns, 9 artillerymen, 550 cavalry, and 2,200 
infantry and police. 

Porehunder. — The Chief of this State, which is situated in the Burda 
district of Kattiawar, belongs to the tribe of Jetwa Rajpoots. At the time 
of the settlement of Kattiawar the ruling Chief was Sirtanjee, but the State 
was virtually managed by his son, Hallajee. At the close of last century this 
State was subjected to many exactions from its neighbours ; and besides the 
revenue payable to the Gaekwar, it paid a tribute of Rupees 7,300 to Joona- 
gurh, Rupees 2,000 to the Babee Chief of Bantwa, Rupees 1,933 to the 
Kusbatee of Mangrole, and Rupees 1,400 to the Portuguese Settlement at Diu. 

In 1808 the usual Engagement (No. LXVII.) against piracy was taken 
from the Chief of Porebunder. In 1809 Rana Sirtanjee quarrelled with his 
son, in consequence of which a rebellion broke out, and the fort of Kundorna 
was seized by the mercenary troops of the Chief, who made it over to the 
Jam of Nowanuggur. The aid of the British Government was called in, by 



118 Kattiawar Agency— Jaflferabad and Bajkot. 

whom the mercenaries were expelled. For the purpose of obtaining the con- 
tinued support of the British Government^ the Chief ceded (No. LXVIII.) half 
the port of Porebunderj and a party of sepoys was stationed there. In 1849 
the Chief executed the usual Engagement (No. LXIV.) to levy no duties on 
ships driven by stress of weather into his ports. This exemption was extended 
(No. XI.) m 1873 to vessels belonging to the Rao of Kuteh. 

In 1869 Porebunder which had till then been a 1st class State was reduced 
to the 3rd class as a punishment for an act of cruelty committed by the Chief. 

The State contains 103 villages. The present Chief, Vikmatjee, is now 
fifty-six years of age. His revenues amount to Rupees 4,00,000. He pays to 
the British Government a tribute of Rupees 21,202, besides Rupees 15,000 
as compensation for the half share of the sea customs, in consideration of 
which he is considered to be specially entitled to the assistance of the 
British Government; to the Gaekwar Rupees 7,196; and to Joonagurh 
Rupees 5,106. 

The Rana of Porebunder is entitled to a salute of eleven guns. The 
military force of the State consists of 2 field and 4 other guns, 10 artillery- 
men, 275 cavalry, and 650 infantry and police. 

Jafferabad. — This petty State, otherwise called Mozufferabad, is subject 
to the Seedee of Jinjeera who ranks in Kattiawar as a 3nd class Chief.* It 
pays no tribute either to the British Government or the Gaekwar. The Seedees 
were the admirals of the Mogul fleet. They possessed some of the principal 
ports on the west coast of India, and the British Government at an early date 
formed commercial relations with them. A commercial Treaty (No. LXIX.) 
was concluded with Seedee Hillol of Jafferabad in 1761. In 1838 the Seedee 
agreed (No. LIV.) to take measures to prevent suttee in his State, and in 
1849 he executed the usual Engagement (No. LXIV.) regarding duty on 
vessels driven into his port by stress of weather. 

This State contains 12 villages with a gross revenue of Rupees 30,000. 
It maintains a military force of 2 field and 2 other guns, 30 cavalry, and 125 
infantry and police. 

Bajkot. — An Agreement (No. LXX.) was made with this State in 1863, 
granting a remission of Rupees 1,500 from the annual tribute as compensa- 
tion for lands ceded as a site for a civil station. 

Thakoor Bawajee, the present Chief of Rajkot, is a Jhareja Rajpoot, and 
nineteen years of age. He is a 2nd class Sirdar of the British Government. 

* See Jiujeera, page 325. 



Kattiawar Agency— Gondul, Wadwan and Mallia. 119 

This State contains 60 villages. The revenues are about Rupees 1^60^000. 
The population is 36^770. The tribute to the British Government, excluding 
the remission, is Rupees 18,991. The Nawab of Joonagurh also receives Rupees 
2,3j30 fromRajkot. A sum of Rupees 2,803-11-10 is yearly paid to the Chief 
as compensation for lands taken up as a site for a cantonment in 1823. The mili- 
tary force of the State is 2 guns and 25 cavalry. 

Gondul. — In 1873 an Agreement (No. LXXI.) was executed with this 
State for the construction of a line of telegraph, which is an offshoot from 
Rajkot. The gross revenue of the State is Rupees 8,80,000 with a popu- 
lation of 137,217 : it contains 180 villages. 

Thakoor Bhugwunt Singjee, the present Chief, is a Jhareja Rajpoot^ and 
is a minor ten years of age. 

The military force of the State consists of 6 field and 10 other gunsj 
198 cavalry, and 659 infantry and police. 

Wadwan. — Dajiraj, Chief of Wadwan, is one of the principal Chiefs in 
the Jhalawar division of Kattiawar. 

In 1864 a remission of Rupees 2,250 was made from the payments to the 
British Government under an Agreement (No. LXXII.), by which the Chief 
ceded certain lands required for civil buildings. At the same time a remission 
of Rupees 250 was made (No. LXXIII.) to the Bhoomias of Doodrej, who are 
of the Wadwan Bhayad. The Bhoomias of Doodrej pay to the British Govern- 
ment Rupees 939-8, besides Rupees 105 to Joonagurh. Their gross revenue is 
about Rupees 12,000. The State is managed by the minister of the late 
Thakoor. 

The present Chief is a minor fourteen years of ag;e. He pays to the 
British Government Rupees 25,778, besides Rupees 6,719-15 for villages 
in Ahmedabad. He also pays Rupees 2,682 to the ^awab of Joonagurh, 

The revenues of Wadwan amount to Rupees 3,50,000. The population is 
45,431 souls : the number of villages is 30. The military force amounts to 
3 field guns, 8 artillerymen, 60 cavalry, and 110 infantry and police. 

Mallia.— In 1863 the Chief of Mallia executed an Agreement (No. LXXIV.) 
engaging to make effective arrangements for keeping the Meenas under proper 
control, to put a stop to their predatory habits, and to be responsible for their 
actions. 



120 



Kattiawar Agency— Mallia. 



Thakoor Moodjeej the present Chief of Mallia, is a Jhareja Rajpoot, 
twenty-nine years of age. Mallia is a ith class State containing 10 villages ; 
its revenue is Rupees 30,000, with, a population of 10,019 souls. The military 
force amounts to 3 guns, 5 artillerymen, 15 cavalry and 40 infantry and police. 

The following are the principal Chiefs in Kattiawar, exclusive of those 
already mentioned. 





Name of Chief. 


Caste. 


Class. 


<1 


o 

r 


Popula- 
tion. 


Revenue. 


MiLITAET POBCB. 


Name of Place. 




is 


if 

1 


Ss 














Bs. 










Drangdra 


Raj Man Sing 


JhalaRiypoot... 


Ist 


38 


125 


87,948 


4,00,000 


6 


12 


140 


160 


Morvee 


Thalsoor Waghjoo 


Jharq'a do. ... 


2nd 


17 


125 


90,616 


6,55,000 


11 




109 


1,060 


Wanlcaneer ... 


Bane Singjee 


JhalaEajpoot... 


„ 


33 


76 


28,760 


1,25,000 


2 


6 


45 


70 


Palitana 


Thakoor Sur Singjee ... 


Gohcl Eajpoot... 


„ 


31 


100 


51,256 


3,00,000 


2 




50 


60 


Dhrol 


,. Jye Singjee 


Jhareja Eajpoot 


„ 


61 


61 


18,321 


1,60,000 


7 




25 


208 


Limree 


„ Jaswut Singjee 


Jhala do. ... 


>» 


16 


72 


46,000 


2,10,000 


3 




32 


84 


Lukhtur 


„ Kahan Singjee... 


Ditto ditto 


3rd 


30 


41 


20,436 


76,000 


3 


6 


35 


60 


Sayla 


„ Kesree Singjee... 


Ditto ditto 


»» 


30 


38 


16,628 


6,000 


1 


10 


20 


40 


Chura 


„ Beohar Singjee... 


Ditto ditto 


„ 


35 


13 


13,793 


■ 1,26,000 


1 


5 


25 


50 


Wala 


„ Wnkhut Singjee 


Gohel Eajpoot 


„ 


11 


40 


13,026 


1,25,000 


2 




60 


60 


Jasdun 


Kachar Ala Chela 


Kathee 


,, 


43 


61 


33,796 


1,46,000 


4 


10 


20 


40 


Bantwa 


Babce Kumal-ood-deen 
Khan. 


Mahomedan ... 


■• 


63 


23 


26,011 


1,40,700 


4 




15 


30 


Lathee 


Thakoor Tnkht Singjee... 


Gohel Eajpoot... 


4th 


32 


8 


7,747 


48,760 


2 




20 


20 


fflooli 


Parmar Sartun Singjee ... 


Pnnnar Eajpoot 


» 


40 


19 


17,681 


1,00,000 


2 


6 


IS 


40 


Bajana 


Malek Nnsseeb Khan ... 


Mahomedan ... 


11 


48 


26 


17,456 


50,000 






16 


30 


Virpore 


Thakoor Sarjyee 


Jhareja Eajpoot 


>» 


30 


12 


6,320 


20,000 











Besides the above Chiefs there are 'in Kattiawar eighteen jurisdictional 
talookdars of the 5th class, forty-three of .the 6th class, and seventeen of 
the 7th class. These smaller talookdars are mostly cadets of the Jhareja 
and Jhala houses, or either Kuchar or Wala Kathees. The Wala Kathees 
own the large estate of Jetpore, which has a revenue of about Rupees 
10,00,000, but it is divided among eighteen sharers, no one of whom is im- 
portant enough to have a higher than 5th class jurisdiction. Those talookdars 
whose jurisdiction has been surrendered or resumed are grouped under the 
thanas according to situation. 



Kattiawar Agency— Pa'el Zamin— Limree— General— TSo. XLIII. 121 



No. XLIII. 

Pa'el Zamin of the Chief of Limeee.* 

Teanslation of the Weiting of the Veeettmgaitm; Veas Bhugtee Moojee to the 
Sheeemunt Eowsheee Sena Khas Khetl Shumshee Bahadooe. 

To wit, — That I do of my own good-will, for the talooka of Limree, 
provide perpetual and effective Fa'el Zamin (or security against committing 
disturbances) to the Sircar of the Guikwar, and to that of the Punt Prudhan, 
or Peishwa, for the two shares, being the whole of the country, as particulars 
here following : — 

Akticlb 1. 

That I will not excite enmity with any other Chieftain, neither entertain 
any IBharwuteea or incendiary whether Kattee or Rajpoot, nor will I commit 
any disturbance by the hands of another, neither will I seize upon the land or 
lands of another, abiding strictly to the same conduct as hitherto observed ; 
neither will I purchase, at the offer of my brethren, their villages or lands 
when they may come to sell them. All past enmities or grievances are to 
rest in oblivion. 

Thieves shall not be entertained within our limits ; if they are permitted 
to remain, it shall be under proper-arrangements, to prevent them from com- 
mitting theft in other talookas, or on the highway. That in whatever case 
individual or individuals may be under the necessity of disposing of their 
villages or lands, that in all such cases the circumstances shall be reported to 
the Sircar previous to entering into the transaction. 

Article 2. 
No delinquent or criminal of the Sircars of the Company Bahadoor, or 
Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor, shall be protected or entertained by us. 

AUTICLE 3. 

The several mehals of the Sircars of the Peishwa, Guikwar, and the 
Honourable Company being situated on all sides of us, in none of these said 
mehals shall any theft or depredation be committed on the highways; pas- 
sengers, merchants, or others travelling shall meet with no molestation, but 
shall be assisted with carriage, and be protected to the extent of our 
boundaries. 

Shoiild any Soukar or other traveller suffer injury on the way, the same 
shall be made good to him by the lord of the talooka where the same took 
filace, who will also seek his redress from the talooka whence the thieves might 
have come. 



# 



This shows the general form of the engagements concluded with the Kattiawar Chiefs. 
With respect to the Chiefs by whom the engagements were signed, see foot-note to page 107 and 
Appendix No. I. 

16 



IV 



122 Kattiawar Agency— Fa'el Zaxain—Limree—Oeneral—TSo. XLIII. 



A.UTICLE 4i. 

If the lands or villages oS. any zemindar shall at present be retained 
forcibly, in case any such possessions shall have been obtained fej written deed 
from the ruined circumstances of any zemindar, the same shall be released and 
set at liberty after the forms of justice, there being no claim hereafter to be 
entertained or made. 

According to the above written Articles, I have afforded fresh security to 
continue from generation to generation, and if the Sircar's Mohsul shall come 
for any default, such satisfaction as the Sircar shall demand on the case in 
point, with daily expense and Mohsul included, shall be given, and for the 
same is Jhalla Ameer Singjeeof Di-angdra perpetual ArrZamin, and for which 
this bond is rendered. 

(Sd.) Veas Bhugteb Mogjeb. 



The writing of Jhalla Ameee Sing of Deangdra. 

To wit, — That I have become fresh and perpetual Arr Zamin to the 
Sircar to render the above Articles effective, and to be responsible in regard 
thereto. 

Signature of the Meiita Puebhoojee, 
on behalf of Jhalla Ameer Singjee, 

Bhandatee of the Honourable Company. 



Seal. 



(Sd.) A. Walker, 

Eesident. 



Perpetual Eevenue Engagement of the Chief of Limeee, 
To Sh-eemunt Bowshree Sena Khas Kheyl Shnmsher Bahadoor writes Jhalla 
Huree Sing, of the TalooJca of Limree, viz. : — 

The armies of the Honourable Company and Guikwar having come into 
this country, with a view to effect a permanent and equitable adjustment 
for the country of Kattywar, and its Bhoomias, Grassias, Kattees, and ryots, 
and that their revenues should continue to be paid at Baroda, I have of my 
own free will and consent engaged, and do by this writing engage, for the 
above talooka, its perpetual jummabundee and kharajat, as per bond separately 
executed, as given when the armies used to arrive in the country. This, 
however, 'being attended with great detriment to the country, and disturbing 
the tranquillity of the ryots, and being convinced that the above arrangement 
provides for my benefit, the jumma of the above talooka and its kharajat 



Kattiawar Agency— Pa'el Zamin—Idmree— General— "So. XLIII. 



123 



shallj each succeeding year, be settled at Baroda, according to the bond, by- 
sending an agent for the purpose, nor shaJl any deviation take place in tliis 
respect. 

I do therefore, for myself, my sons, and grandsons, from generation to 
generation, and my successors, engage ta the above purpose ; and for any 
deviations therein, they become responsibre to government. 

Signature of Jhalla Hueee Sing. 
Bhandaree of the Honourable Comjoani/. 



Seal. 



(Sd.) 



A. Walker, 
Resident. 



Teanslation of the Decennial Secueity Bond, being the writing of Sowjee Puttoo, 
on behalf of Jhalla Htjeee Singjee of Limeee, to the Sheeemunt Kowsheeb 
Sena Khas Khetl Shumshee Bahadooe. 

That for Jhalla Huree Sing, of the talooka of Limree, I have engaged 

for the jummabundee for ten years to the Sircar, being, for jummabundee 

and kharajat included. Rupees 51,931, and agreeably thereto are the several 

instalments given in writing ; and agreeably to these instalments are the 

payments to be made in Baroda, attending at the stated periods, and having 

made the settlement thereof, then return ; yet if it so happen that any 

delay shall in this occur, the same delay shall be made good by interest for 

the number of days beyond the stated period of instalment at one per cent. 

per month. 

Supees. 

The yearly kist or bond to be rendered will' be for ... ... 51,931 

Particulars of which are — 
Jummabundee ... 

Kharajat, in which will come Sooba Soofiree 
Benee Bahadaree 
Nuzerana horse ... 
Zemindar Sookree 
Dewanjee ... 

Durrukdars 
Shageerd Pesha ... 
Soot and Chumera 







... 48,001 






... 1,000 






... 1,101 






501 






501 






301 






326 






125 






75 


Total Rupees 


... 51,931 



Payable at these instalments, vie. : — 

Margsheerh Soodh (or December) 2nd. 
Pons Soodh (or Janua' y) 2nd. 
Magh Soodh (or March) 2nd. 
Falgoon Soodh (or April) 2nd. 



124 Kattiawar Agency— Arr Zaxxi.in.—Zimree—&eiieral—No, XLIV. 



No. XLIV. 

Memoeahdum of an Ageeembnt with the Chieftain of Limeee touching the Settle- 
ment of the Limeee Talooka. 

Article 1. 

A permanent agreement with a guarantee touching the injury to which 
my old talooka, including the villages in the Dhundooca and Ranpore, is liable 
by the egress and regress of the army. 

Article 3. 

The instalments and inoney payments shall be made as heretofore. The 
chundcj provision, and paun-sooparee shall be supplied by me, in the usual 
manner, to any village guard furnished on my requisition, during the egress 
and regress of the army. 

Article 3. 

If any cattle should go into the camp from my talooka after the payments 
shall be made, they shall be given up in the usual manner. 

Article 4. 
The payments of my Bhayad being made separately to the government, 
they shall be realized by it, without any molestation to me on that account. 

Article 5. 

If any of my Bhayad or co-sharers should prefer an appeal to Govern- 
ment, I am not to be restrained, by any unjust interference on its part, in 
what I have hitherto enjoyed under written instruments. On the other hand, 
I am to do nothing henceforward without the sanction of government pre- 
viously obtained. 

Article 6. 

If any part of my conduct should appear exceptionable to govei'nment, 
it shall, in the first instance, despatch a Cossid to warn me, and if I should 
omit to send back a person along with the same Cossid to justify myself to 
government, a Mohsul is to be thereupon despatched. 

Article 7. 

If through the dispensations of Providence my country should be visited 
in any year by afflictions, heavenly or earthly, the government shall afford 
me its succour in such year. 

Article 8. 
If the payments on account of the Choova talooka should not be made in 
any year, I will cause the Chief of Bhurkoova to liquidate the same accord- 
ing to the amount assessed by government on the said village of Bhurkoova, 
being Rupees 475, but no injury is to be done to the village. 



Kattiawar Agency— Girassia Court Kules— No. XLV, 125 



Article 9. 

I request the succour of government in conformity with the foregoing 
representation, and upon the condition that I regularly make the payments at 
Baroda from Siimwut of the year 1865, during the whole of the decennial 
settlement, and enter into a written engagement to make the same payments 
at Baroda in all time to come ; and further that I give fa' el and arr security 
permanently for my suhmission (Rujoo) to government. I request the 
guarantee for the just and due fulfilment of this agreement of Major 
Alexander Walker on the part of the Honourable Company. 



Article 10. 
It is herehy agreed that the stipulations of the foregoing ten Articles 
shall be carried into effect by government. 



Alexander Walker, Major. 



Seal. 



Persian. 
Signed in English. 

Bated Gamp near PergunnaJi Surpudtir, talooka Daley, in Kattywar, one 
Bamzan Sunnut Sttman-ivu Mytein-wu-Vlf {A.I). 1807-08.) 



No. XLV. 



Rules for the Settlement of Claims of Suboedinate Bhatads and Moolgieassias of 

Katitwak States. 

A survey and settlement of lands and settlement of other rights belong- 
ing to Bhayads and Moolglrassias will be made by the Durbars by means of 
their own officers. To ensure uniformity and greater skill in decision^ a 
General Superintendent of these surveys will be appointed and paid for by 
the Durbars. The survey and settlement will be proceeded with and com- 
pleted with all possible despatch. Quarterly progress reports will be sub- 
mitted to the Rajasthanik Sabha, by whom they will be forwarded to 
Government through the Political Agent. 

2. As a record of the survey and settlement in each State, a Eegister 
shall be prepared in triplicate, subject to the arrangements hereinafter 



126 Eattiawar Agency— Girassia Court Eules— No. XLV. 



described. One copy will be preserved in the records of the State concerned, 
one copy will be recorded by the Rajasthanik Sabha, and one copy will be 
placed in the Agency records. The Durbars will furnish to the Bhayad or 
Moolgirassia concerned a certified copy of the entry regarding his holding. 

3. Where there is no dispute about arrears or dues to the Durbar, or 
where the Bhayad or Moolgirassia agrees in writing to the settlement offered 
by the Durbar, an entry to that effect shall be made in the register. The 
Eajasthanik Sabha shall, by calling before them the parties concerned, or by 
other proper means, satisfy themselves that the settlement has been duly 
understood and freely agreed to, and shall then sign the entry in the .register, 
and no further proceedings shall be allowed. A quarterly progress reports 
of such entries having been signed will be made to the Political Agent for 
his information. 

4. "When at the time of survey and settlement the Bhayad or Mool- 
girassia declines to accept the terms offered, he shall give the Durbar oflScer 
a memorandum of his claim, which the Durbar shall dispose of in the first 
instance, noting the fact of the objection. The Durbar officer will imme- 
diately send to the Rajasthanik Sabha copy of his decision. 

5. If dissatisfied with the decision of the Durbar, the Bhayad or Mool- 
girassia may, within a period of ninety (90) days (exclusive of the days 
occupied in furnishing him with a copy of the decision) present a petition 
to the Rajasthanik Sabha, showing distinctly what he claims ; and the Sabha 
shall enquire into and dispose of the petition according to these rules. For 
special and sufficient reason the Sabha may extend the above period. 

6. The Rajasthanik Sabha shall be composed of a President and two 
Members : — 

I. — The President shall be appointed by Government from among such 
persons as the Durbars shall propose. Should none of the persons proposed 
meet with the approval of Government, the Durbars will be informed and 
requested to submit other names within a reasonable time. If they fail within 
a reasonable time to submit a list, which shall be approved. Government may 
appoint. 

II. — The Durbars will submit twelve names of persons suitable to be 
members of the Rajasthanik Sabha, and out of these Government will select 
six members. The President of the Court will call two out of these selected 
six from time to time to sit with him at the trial of cases. Either party to a 
case may object to one of the members called, and the President will substitute 
another for him. 

III. — All cases brought before the Rajasthanik Sabha shall be heard by 
the President and two members. But if upon any point whatever the Presi- 
dent and the two members differ in opinion as to the decision which should be 
passed, the Political Agent, who, for the case in question, will be the chief 
President, shall decide which of the opinions shall be the decision of the 
Rajasthanik Sabha. 



Kattiawar Agency— Girassia Court Rules— No. XLV. 127 

7. The persons entitled to have their claims of the kind described in 
paragraph 8 heard and disposed of by the Rajasthanik Sabha are — 

I. — Bhayads. | II. — Moolgirassias. 

By the term Moolgirassia is meant the original proprietor or the descen- 
dant of the original projirietor of a village or villages, or portion of a village 
or villages, who has made over a village or villages, or portion of a village or 
villages, or a portion of his ancient rights over a village or villages, or portion 
of a village or villages as Moolgirassia to the Chief, retaining to himself 
another portion or certain rights therein. 

Within the term Moolgirassia shall also be included, for the purpose of 
the proposed arrangement, Girassias holding or claiming to hold rights which 
in the judgment of the Rajasthanik Sabha are similar to those of the Mool- 
girassias. 

The claims of persons (not being Bhayads) holding or claiming to hold 
rights on account Ckakari/at (in consideration of service to be rendered) , on 
account of Inam (in consideration of past service or under grant or gift), on 
account of Dhurmada (under a grant for religious purposes), and on other 
personal tenures which in the judgment of the Bajasth'anik Sabha are similar 
to those set forth in this proviso, shall not be heard by the Rajasthauik Sabha 
but shall be heard by and disposed of by the Durbar Courts. 

The claims of mortgagees, sub-tenants, or assignees of Bhayads or 
Moolgirassia shall not be heard by the Rajasthanik Sabha, but shall be heard 
and disposed of by the Duibar Courts. 

8. The Rajasthanik Sabha shall, subject to the limitations contained in 
paragraph 7, have jurisdiction in Girass cases brought before them by Bhayads 
and Moolgirassias when the dispute is between the Bhayad or Moolgirassia on 
the one part, and the Durbar on the other part. But when at the time of the 
survey and settlement a dispute arises in which the Durbar is not, a party, as 
for example between a Moolgirassia or a Bhayad on one side, and another 
Moolgirassia, Bhayad, or other person, on the other side, the settlement will be 
effected by the officers of the Durbar ; and if either party is dissatisfied, he 
shall be left to make his appeal in the ordinary Durbar Court, or in the third 
or fourth class States when the claim may be beyond the jurisdiction of the 
Durbar, it may be made in the Agency Court. Such cases shall not be heard 
in the Rajasthanik Sabha, 

Provided always that the Rajasthanik Sabha shall have jurisdiction in 
any ease in which the claimant establishes to the satisfaction of the Rajas- 
thanik Sabha that the Durbar or a principal officer of the Durbar have a sub- 
stantial interest in the case whether immediate or contingent. 

9. The onus of proving that a complainant is a Bhayad or Moolgirassia 
shall rest on the claimant. 

10. The Rajasthanik Sabha shall have power at its discretion to reject 
or require amendment of any petition when on the face of it it appears that 



128 Kattiawar Agency- Girassia Court Rules— No. XLV. 



the claim is not within the jurisdiction of the Sabha, or is contrary to these 
rules. 

11. A fee of one-half of an anna per rupee shall be paid by the com- 
plainant on the estimated value of the property in dispute. The value shall 
be calculated at ten years' income. 

The fee shall be refunded to the person paying it if the decision shall be 
given in his favor, and if part of the claim only be awarded, the refund shall 
be in that proportion. 

Otherwise the fees received shall go to defray the expenses of the Sabha. 

12. Complaints, where the alleged dispossession of land or other rights 
has occurred since 1860 a.d.; shall be heard and disposed of whatever now 
pending or not. 

Complaints, where the alleged dispossession of lands or other rights 
occurred before 1850 a.d., shall not be heard, unless the case was returned to 
the Durbar under Colonel Keatinge's arrangements in 1863. 

Provided, however, that where the Rajasthanik Sabha is of opinion that 
for any other special and sufGcient cause complaints of dispossession of lands 
and other rights occurring before 1850 a.d. should be heard, it shall have dis- 
cretion to do so. Provided that a previous complaint has been made and that 
the dispossession has occurred after 1830 a.d, 

13. No case in which Government or the Political Agency has passed a 
decision, or in which a settlement has been made by the free consent of both 
parties, or by a Punchayet appointed by both parties, shall be re-opened. 

14. The Rajasthanik Sabha shall be guided by the Mulk Sherista and 
by local usage. 

15. The Political Agent shall in conjunction with the President of the 
Rajasthanik Sabha, and two of the six selected members, named by the Dur- 
bars, frame subsidiary rules for the procedure of the Rajasthanik Sabha, sub- 
ject to the approval of Government. 

16. On the consent of both parties the Rajasthanik Sabha may refer 
matters for the decision of a Punchayet. 

17. All previous records relating to any case before the Rajasthanik 
Sabha may be taken as evidence, the vaule or weight of such evidence being 
estimated by the Sabha. 

18. When the Rajasthanik Sabha has passed a decision, an entry in 
accordance with such decision will be made in the register, and will be signed 
by the Rajasthanik Sabha. 

19. Professional Vakeels will be admitted at the discretion of the Sabha, 
but costs will not be allowed. 

~ 20. The decision of the Rajasthanik Sabha shall have the same finality 
in cases heard under these rules as those passed by the Talookdaree Courts in 
ordinary cases. There shall be no appeal from the Rajasthanik Sabha to any 
Agency or other Court, but its proceedings shall be subject to the general 



Kattiawar Agency— Infanticide— No. XL VI. 129 



control of the paramount power, exercised through the Political Agent in 
Kattywar, and the decisions of Rajasthanik Sabha shall be upheld by the 
same authority. 



StrPPLEMENTAET KuLES. 

I. The Rajasthanik Court to have the powers of a Political District 
Court as regards the causes triable in it. The President will at his discretion 
impose Mohsuls to ensure attention to the orders and processes of the Court, 
and may otherwise assert its position by the means open to a District Civil 
Court. Mohsuls should be sent on Durbars where they are in fault, and 
through the Durbars where their subjects are concerned. 

II. — Mohsuls imposed by the president to be credited to the Sabha in the 
Treasury accounts. The Political Agent to be removed to allow an account to 
be kept in his Treasury. 

III.— ^When in the opinion of the President it may be necessary, he may 
associate with himself either one or two chief Karbharies in the place of a 
member or members of the Court. 

IV. — The court will notify to the Political Agent its terms of sessions 
and vacations. 

By order, &c.j 

Bombay Castle, ^ (Sd.) C. Gonne, 

The 26tA August 1873. ) Secy, to the Govt, of Bombay. 



No. XLVI. 

ENaAGEMENT entered into by the Jhabeja Chiefs for the suppression of Infanticide. 

Whereas the Honourable English Company and Anund Rao Gnikwar Sena 
Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor having set forth to us the dictates of the 
Shasters and the true faith of the Hindoos, as well as that the ' Brumhu 
Vywurtuk Pooran ' declares the killing of children to be a heinous sin, it being 
written that it is as great an offence to kill an embryo as a Brahmin ; that to 
kill one woman is as great a sin as killing a hundred Brahmins ; that to put 
one child to death is as great a transgression against the divine laws as to kill 
a hundred women ; and that the perpetrator of this sin shall be damned to the 
hell Kule Sootheeta, where he shall be infested with as many maggots as he 
may have hairs on his body, be born again a leper, and debilitated in all his 
members, we, Jhajeja Dewajee and Kooer Nuthoo, zemindars of Gondul (the 
custom of female infanticide having long prevailed in our caste,) do hereby 
agree, for ourselves and for our offspring, as also we bind ourselves, in behalf of 
our relations and their offspring, for ever, for the sake of our own prosperity, 
and for the credit of the Hindoo faith, that we shall from this day renounce 
this practice; and, in default of this, that we acknowledge ourselves offenders 
against the Sircars. Moreover, should any one in future commit that offence, 

IV 17 



130 



Kattiawar Agency— Infanticide— No. XLVI. 



we shall expel him from our caste, and he shall bo punished according to the 
pleasure of the two governments and the rule of the Shasters. 

The above Engagement was signed ly the following Chiefs: — 



No. 


Names. 


Talookas of Villages. 


1 


Jhareja Hoteejee 


Kotara Sanganee. 


2 


Jhareja Dossajee and Kooer Suttajee 




MaUia. 


3 


Jhareja Jehajee 




Moorvee. 


4 


Jhareja Eunmuljee and Kooer Lakajee 




Eajkot. 


5 


JamJessajee 




Nowanuggur. 


6 


Jhareja Eunmuljee, by the agency of Kooer verajee 




Sirdhar. 


7 


Jhareja Dewajee and Kooer Nuthoojee 




Gondul. 


' 


Jhareja Boput Sing 




Dehrol. 


8 


Jhareja Hoteejee 




Kursura. 


^ 


Jhareja Suttajee 




Jallia. 


9 


Jhareja Khengarjee 




Hurmuteea. 


Jhareja Jehajee 




Kotaree. 




J harej a Eamsingjee 




Amba. 




Jhareja Kheemajee 




Lodeka. 




Jhareja Dewajee 




Paal. 




Jhareja Morjee 




Goureedur. 


10- 


Jhareja Dossajee 




Kotaria. 


Jhareja Khanjee 




Wudalee. 




Jhareja Tejmuljee 




Veerwa. 




Jharejas Khanjee and Bhanjee 




Gudka. 




Jhareja Eai Sing 




Shapoor. 




Jharejas Eaojee and Hudoojee 




Kangseealee. 


( 


Jharej a Phoolj ee 




..» 




Jhareja Salleyuljee 






" 


Jhareja Eaebjee 

Jhareja Jejee Easanjee ... 




■ Drappa. 


I 


Jhareja Eamsingjee 






12 


Jhareja Maroojee and Kooer Osajee ... 




Eajpoor ; the Bhaya^ 
of Kotara Sanganee. 


13 


Jhareja Bunajee 




Barwa. 


14 


Jhareja Samutjee ... ... .,.- 

Jhareja Phoolajee 




Mengnee. 


15 


Jhareja Dadajee 
Jhareja Soojajee 
Jhareja Mukunjee 




Seesang. 


16 


Jharejas Pemjee and Wagjee 




Dedee Molee. 


17 


Jhareja Soorajee 




Kuree and Veerpoor. 


/ 


Jhareja Kana Mooloo 




■> 


I 


Jhareja Kana Mota 






jsj 


Jhareja Kana Hookajeo ... 
Jhareja Kana Eokajee ... 
Jhareja Kana Puchanjee. . , 




• Salodur Wowree. 


V 


J harej a Kana Nuthooj ee . . . 






19 


Kooer Sallajee 






20 


Eana Sirtanjee and Kooer Hallajee, Jetwas 




Porebunder. 



(Sd.) A. Walkkb, 

Resident, 



Kattiawar Agency— Infanticide— Wo. XLVII. 131 

" Nq. XLVII. 

Eenewed Engagement against Infanticide entered into by the Jam of Nowanugguk, 

on the 25tli February 1812. 

Engagement passed by Jam Jessajee of NowANUGGtrE, to Sheeemunt Rae 
Sheee Sena Khas Khetl Shumshee Bahadooe, and the Honotjeable East India 
Company Bahadooe, dated Falgoon Soodh 13th, Sumwut 1868 (a.d. 15th February 1812). 

From the commencement it was a custom in our Jhareja caste not 
to preserve the lives of daughters. On this both governments, after expound-, 
ing the Shaster on this subject, and pointing out to us the way of the 
Hindoo religion, stated that it is written in the " Brumhu Vywurtuk Pooran," 
(a sacred work,) that whoever commits this act his sin is great, equal to 
" Gurbhu Hutya," (killing an infant in the womb,) and " Brumhu Hutya," 
(killing a Brahmin,) so that killing a child is equal to killing 100 Brahmins ; 
but in this act two sins are committed, viz., that of killing woman and child. 
The punishment written for this sin is that the person who commits it will 
remain in "Ruvruwadik Kuth Soothul Nurk," (name of a particular place in 
hell,) for as many years as there are hairs on the person of the said woman, 
after which, when he is born again, he would become a "Koreea," (leprous), 
and be subject to " Puksh Ghat" (paralytic stroke) . Both governments said 
this to us according to the Shaster, in which, the year Sumwut 1864, (a.d. 
1808), I, my brothers, nephews, &c., all the Jharejas of my talooka, passed 
a writing to the Sircar, binding ourselves not to kill daughters. To enquire 
about this a person lately came to us from the Sircai', and we wrote a reply 
and sent with him. The Sircar again, in the year Sumwut 1868 (a.d. 1813), 
required me to pass this agreement ; and I do hereby state that, out of deference 
to the Hindoo- religion, I and my posterity, viz., sons and grandsons, and my 
brothers and nephews, and all, bind ourselves in perpetuity that henceforward 
we shall not do this act ; if we do, we shall be considered offenders against 
the Sircar. If in future any one of our caste people commits this act, and 
if it shall come to our knowledge, we shall, after expelling him out of caste, 
make him answer for his sin, and according to the will of the Sircar. Per- 
petual securities, given for the fulfilment of the above writing, are Bharote 
Meroo Mehta of Veerumgaum, and Bharote Ramdass Nuthoo of Julsum 
who shall be answetable for it. This is a true writing. 

Dated Sumwut 1868, Falgoon Soodh 13tA, corresponding with the ^bih 
February AD. 1813. 

(Sd.) Jam Shueb Jessajee, 

We, Bharote Meroo Mehta of Veerumgaum, and Bharote Ramdass 
Nuthoo of Julsum, pergunnah Petlaud, do hereby state that we shall abide, 
and cause them to abide also, by the above writing, and we ourselves shall be 
answerable for it. 

Marked x of Bhauotb Mbkoo Mehta. 
Marked x of Bharote Ramdass Nuthoo. 



132 Kattiawar Agency— Infanticide— No. XLVIII. 



No. XLVIII. 

Tbansiation of a Letter from Jhaeeja Sooeajee of Kajkot, to J P. WiiiLouGHBT, Esq., 
Political Agent, dated Shrawun Vud 10th, Sumwut 1892, corresponding with 18th 
August A.D. 1835. 

Your letter of the 20tli June has been received. You have therein 
written that I am to pay a fine of Rupees 12^000. My circumstances are in- 
sufficient to enable me to pay this sum at once. I beg, therefore, you will do 
me the favour to settle some way in which I can do it. You have further 
written that I am to inform you beforehand of births likely to take place in 
' my family. This is well, and I shall do so. In regard to your request that 
I should furnish security to abstain from the custom of putting my daughters 
to death in future, I beg to state that I am determined to renounce the custom. 
My possessions are entirely under the Sircar ; but if notwithstanding this, 
you should wist me to give security, I shall duly furnish the same. I have, 
agreeably to your orders, banished Mehtas Bulwunt Joeta, and Dulputram 
.Kooshall from my talooka. In respect to Patel Lukmon's mother and the 
other persons who gave evidence in my ease, or any of their relations, not 
suffering, as you have written, any harm at my hands, I beg to state that 
Patel Lukmon is as a son of the Durbar, and there is no one higher in its 
estimation than he is. I have, notwithstanding this day called him into my 
presence, and spoken to him in terms of encouragement and confidence before 
four Sowkars and two other persons, whom I had summoned on the occasion. 
The proclamation regarding the daughters of Jharejas, which you have trans- 
mitted, has been received, and I shall take the measures it directs. Whatever 
the Sircar does is designed exclusively for our good, and I am therefore obedient- 
to its wishes. 1 beg you will fix some way in which I can pay the fine im- 
posed on me, and withdraw the attachment on my talooka. The character of 
my place depends on the Sircar. 

Rajah Chundersingjee of .Wankaneer writes as follows :— 

Whereas the Jhareja people formerly put their daughters to death, there, 
by committing a sin of great enormity, and Colonel Walker, in Sumwut 1864, 
caused them to enter into engagements to abandon the inhuman custom and 
preserve their female offspring for the future ; but notwithstanding this the 
Chief of Rajkot, Sirdar Jhareja Soorajee, disregarded and broke this engage- 
ment, and put a daughter to death, which case of infanticide was investigated 
in the month of October ] 834<, and the crime proved by means of witnesses ; 
it therefore became necessary to call upon him to furnish security that he 
would not commit such a dreadful deed in future, and he has named me : I 
therefore agree to become perpetual security for him, and accordingly execute 
this writing, to the effect that Jhareja Soorajee shall inform the Sircar when- 
ever the birth of a child may be expected in his family, and that he shall never 
injure or threaten Patel Lukmon^s mother, or any other people or their rela- 
tion he who may have given evidence in the case of infanticide against him ; 
that he shall act agreeably to, and maintain the engagements formerly effected 
by the Sircar for the preservation of the daughters of Jharejas, and the 



Kattiawar Agency— Opium— ITo, XLIX. 133 



■proclamation, dated 23nd November 1834, issued on the same subject ; and that 
Jhareja Soorajee shall punctually inform the Sircar of any breach of these 
engagements which may occur within his talooka. I have become security for 
him in case he may not inform the Sircar of any case of infanticide coming 
within his knowledge, or uphold and maintain the engagements for the aboli- 
tion of this horrid custom, and am therefore bound to see the same done, and 
responsible to government for any breach that may hereafter arise. 

This writing is duly signed, Ashad Soodh \hth, Sumwut 1891 {correspond- 
ing with Uh October A.D. 1835.) 

(Sd.) Jhalla Chcndersingjbe, 
and for him by Koobr Wukutsingjee. 



Similar security from the Chief of Kotra Sangana. 



No. XLIX. 



To Sheee Siecae Captain Baenewbll, Political Agent in Katttwae, on beHaif of 

the HoNOUEABLE Company. 

To wit, — The Dewan of talooka Nowanuggur, Mehta Motiram Samuljee, 
writes that a store has been established at Ranpore since 1st February a.d. 1821, 
corresponding with Sumwut 1877, Pons Wud 14th. Draft of a proclamation 
has also been furnished to me, directing that those who wanted opium for 
retail sale within this talooka should purchase the same from that store._ The 
proclamation in the prescribed form will be published in the town and villages 
of the pergunnahs for the information of the people at large. If any one 
requires any opium for retail sale, he will be furnished with a letter, and sent 
to the government store to purchase it. If any one purchases any opium 
from any place other than the government store, or if any one sells it, or 
brings it from other countries, the facts shall be reported to government 
immediately, and the opium appearing to be other than of the government 
store drug shall be confiscated by government; one-third of it shall.be paid 
to the informer, and the remaining two-thirds to the talookdar within whose 
limits it was seized. Should it be confiscated within my territory, govern- 
ment will be pleased to make over the same to me. 

Sumwut 1877 ;Fot(S Soodh %th, Thursday Uth January A.B. 1821. 

(Sd.) MoTi Samuljee. 



134 Kattiawar Agency— Opium— ITo. XLIX. 

Letters to the same effect as the preceding, addressed by the undermen- 
tioned Chiefs, are also forthcoming : — 

Bate of letters. 

rSumwut 1877, Pous 
1, Rana Shree Kheemajee of talooka Poorbundur ...J. SoodhSrd (7th Janu- 

(. uary 1831). 

1, Rana Shree Umersingjee, zemindar of talooka P"^."^"* l^nl'.u^^f^ 

Drangdra ... 1 Wud 1st (17th Feb- 

^ (. ruary 1821). 

r Sumwut 1877, Pous 
1, Maharana Pratheeraj, zemindar of Than Lukhtur. ] Soodh l^th (17th 

( January 1831). 
1, Mulck Bawa Meean, Mulck Chandajee, Mulck ( Snmwut 1877, Magh 
Larjee, Mulck Dullajee, and the Dassareas ] Wud 1st (17th Feb- 
jointly, zemindars of talooka Dussara ... ... ( ruary 1821). 

( Sumwut 1877, Magh 

1, Mulck Duria Khan of talooka Buj ana \ Wud 1st (17th 

( February 1821). 
1, Puthoojee, Koombhajee, Geerdhurjee, and Kah- ( Sumwut 18 7 7 

najee, zemindars of talooka-fhinjoowara ... ( (1820-21). 

\ Sumwut 1877, Magh 
1, Mulck Bapjee, zemindar of talooka Wunode ... j Wud 1st (17th 

( February 1821). 
1, Jadeja Mooloojee of talooka Veerpore Khureree 18th January. 

1, The undermentioned Zemindars of the Talookas in Kattywar have signed 
one joint letter, dated 18th January : — 

1. Wala Vicumsee Jetha'nee and others of Jaitpoor Cheetul. 

2. Khachur Chella Wajsoor of Jusdhun. 

3. Khachurs Ogur and Moka, sons of Wajsoor, of Khumbhala. 

4. Khuvur Sadool Loona of Soodamra, signed on the 19th January. 

5. Wala Hursoor Hathia of Bhulgam. 

1, Guzuffer Khan, Mahomed Khan, and Unwur Khan ) , oxi t 

of Batwa 18th January. 



Teanslation of a Notification sent ty Captain Baenewell, Political Agent in 
Katttwae, to the Chief of the Peovince of Katttwae, for Publication with- 
in theii- Eespective Teeeitobies, with the endorsement of some consenting to 
act accordingly. 

_ Shree Durbar proclaims to all the people that Captain Barnewell, the 
Political Agent in Kattywar, has sent us a notification, which is published for 
your information. 



Kattiawar Agency— Opium— Wo. XLIX. 135 



The Political Agent will address a perwannah to me about the Showkar's 
opium passing through my territory, which will dontain the quality and quan- 
tity of the opium, and whether it is contained in baskets, leather-ppts, boxes 
or carts, as also the place where it will be stored. 

A register containing the names, &c., of the persons who bring opium to 
my town and villages dependent to it and sell it, and of the purchasers, should 
be kept. On enquiry by Government, should any one fail to produce a regular 
register, or if any one conceal the real amount sold, a duty, at the rate of one 
Rupee per each seer short, will be charged and recovered from the dealer. 

The duty on the opium covered by a pass will not be much. This arrange- 
ment has been made by Government with a view to prevent opium being 
exported at any of the seaports. 

Should any opium be brought on carts, camels, bullocks, vessels, or by 
any other oonveyance without a pass, the opium, with the conveyance, will be 
confiscated in payment of the fine. A third part of it will be paid to the 
person who causes it to be seized, or who points out the smuggler with cer- 
tainty, and the remaining two parts will be paid to the Talookdar or Zemindar 
of the place where it was seized, and if it be seized within my talooka, the 
same will be given to me. 

Should any person keep or cause to be kept concealed any opium which 
has been smuggled as above, the opium will be seized for the offence, and an 
amount double its value will be recovered from him as fine. A third part of the 
whole will be paid to the informer, and the remaining two parts to the Talookdar 
or Zemindar in whose limits it may be seized. If it be discovered within 
my territory, the same will be paid to me. 

Simwut 1876, Znd JesM, Wud 9tA {Uh July 1830;. 



Endorsements helow copies of the draft proclamation or letters containing 

similar clauses. 

WUDWAN. 

Proclamations to the above effect will be promulgated within my territory 
and arrangements about opium made accordingly. 

(Sd.) Jhalla Jallxjmsingjee. 
Sumwut 1876, Ind JesRl, Wud 2th (UIi July 1830;, 



136 Kattiatirar Agency— Opium— No. XZiIX. 

LiMRBB. 

Arrangements will be carried out in conformity to your letter which has 
been received. 

(Sd.) Jhalla Hubee Sing, 
In the handwriting of Nuthoo Jbeyunram. 
Sumwui 1876; Znd JesU, Wud %th (UJi July 1820;. 



GONDXIL. 



Government having sent Mehtas to make arrangem^nis about opium to 
Gondul, Dhorajee, and Oopletta, I agree to act as above. 

Mark x of Jadeja Sheee Chunduasingjeb. 
Sumwut 1877, Magh, SoodA Ul (1th February 182^. 



Teanslation of a Lettbe from Jhala Chundba SiwajEB of Wankaneee, to Captain 
Baenewbll, Political Agent in Katttwae. 

After compliments. — The Sircar's notification about opium has been 
received. I have made arrangements by your order since last year. In my 
town no one has got any old opium. The quantity required up to this time 
for the talpoka's consumption was obtained from the Government store at 
Limree. Hereafter it will be fetched from Eajkot. Enquiries are being made 
about passers by, but as yet no one has been apprehended. Whenever any one 
is seized. Government will be informed. Please write letters in return. 

Sumwut 1878, KarticJc, Wud Uh (Vith November 1821;. 

Letters to the same effect as the preceding, from the undermentioned 
talookas, are forthcoming : — 

1, Saela, dated Sumwut 1878, Kartick, Soodh llth (6th November 1821). 

1, Moolee, dated Sumwut 1878, Kartick, Soodh 13th, (7th November 
1821). ^ 



Teanslation of a Lettee from Jhala Ubhb Singjee of Swusthan Chooea, to the 
address of Captain Baenewbll, Political Agent in Katttwae. 

After compliments.— The Sircar's perwannah about opium has been 
received, and will be proclaimed throughout my territory. No one will import 



Kattiawar Agency— Opium— No. XLIX. 137 

smuggled opium. Those who require opium will be made acquainted with the 
contents of the Sircar's perwannah. In these days no one can act irregularly. 
Dealers sell opium by order of Government at the rate of three Rupees' weight 
per Rupee. This is my request. 

Sumwut 1878, Kartick, Soodh iWi (Qth November 182y. 



A similar letter has been received from the Bhoomia of Wurode, dated 
Sumwut 1878, Kartic, Soodh 13th (7th November 1821). 



Teanslation of a Lettee from Khachue Chella Wajsgoe of Jusdun, to Captain 
Baenewell, Political Agent in Kattywae. 

After compliments. — The Government Notification about opium has been 
received, and the contents have been made known. I will make arrangements 
as therein directed. Should I require any opium for consumption, I will 
obtain it from the Government store at Rajkot. 

Dated 1878 Kartick, Wud 5tk f'Zdtk November 1821^. 

Letters to the same effect as the preceding, from the undermentioned 
Girassias, are forthcoming : — 

r Sumwut 1878 (a.d. 
1, Jhala Jeevunjee, &c., of Chucliana ... ... ... < 1821), Kartick Wud 

( 7th. 

( Sumwut 1878. (a.d. 
1, Jhala Nuthoohhae and Kurunbhae of Pulaloe ... . . . < 1821), Kartick Wud 

( 11th. 

( Sumwut 1878 (a.d. 
1, Jhala Agar Sing of Kurmur ... ... ...\ 1821), Kartick Wud 

I 4th. 

C Sumwut 1878 (a.d. 
1, Bhambhla Kadoo Jiva of Bharejra ... ... ... 1821), Kartick Wud 

[ 11th. 

[Sumwut 1878 (a.d. 
1; KurpraMoolooof Kampur... .,, ... ... < 1821), Kartick Wud 

. i 13th. 

( Sumwut 1878 (a.d. 
1, Eae Sauklee, Desaeebhae Ramdass ... ... ... ] 1821), Kartick Soodh 

i 13th. 

r Sumwut 1878 (a.d. 
1, Khachur Kama Mooloo and Oonur of Paliad ... ... < 1821), Kartick Wud 

{ 2nd. 



Teanslation of a Letter to the address of Sheee Siecae Captain Baenewell, Politi- 
cal Agent in Katttwae, on behalf of the Honoueable Company Bahadooe. 

To wit, — Purmar Bunney Sing and the other brothers of Moojpur, 
jointly beg to submit their respectful compliments, and to represent that your 
IV 18 



138 



Kattiawar Agency— Opium— If o. XLIX. 



perwannah about making opium arrangements has been duly received. The 
arrangements will be made as directed by you. The opium required for our 
consumption will be obtained from the government store. Should any one 
carry any opium without a government passport^ we will apprehend him 
and communicate the circumstances to government. This is the petitionj dated 
Sumwut 1878, Kartiek Wud 11th, Tuesday (20th November 1821). 



(Sd.) PuKMAR BUNNEY SlNG, 

In the handwritinsr of Jhala Mallajee. 



Similar letters have been received from th€ undermentioned Girassias, 
dated as set forth opposite tlieir names : — 



1, Jhala Bechmjee of Wunna 

1, „ Kussyajee of Oontree 

1, „ Nagjee and Kandhabbhae of Gen-ee 

1, „ Jalumsingjee and Jivabhae cf Devulia 

1, „ Jetheejee of Wimala 

1, „ Runchoijee and Hallabhae of Kumalpore 

1, „ Nuthoojee and Kanthurjco of Laliad 

1, „ Chandabhae and Hurribhac of Bhurukwa ... 

1, „ Kusiabhae, Euttonjee, and Attabhae of Durode 

1, „ Wustajee of Khumbhlao 

1, „ Puthobhae and Gujabhae of Jakhun 

1, „ Euttonjee and Attabhae of Chulala 

1, „ Hurjee of Showka 

1, „ Jeebhae and Bhimjee of Bhulgami'a 

1, „ Jethibhae and Jorabhae of Kuntharia 

1, „ Khimabhae of Tulsana 

1, „ Bhimjee and Nathoobhae of Bhuthan 

1, „ Gopaljee and Bunnabhae of Unkawalia 

1, „ Nagbhae and Jemulbhae of Khandia 

1, „ Kusiabhae and MuUabhae of Sumla 

1, „ Fuljee Bharajee and Jethibhae of Tavee 

1, „ Seshabhae of Julala 



f Sumwut 1878 (a.d. 
{ 1821), Pous Soodh 
( 4.th, Friday. 



' Sumwut 
IS^I), 
\ 8th. 


1878 (a.d. 
Pous Soodh 


Sumwut 
1821), 
[ 11th. 


1878 (a.d. 
Kartiek Wud 


Ditto 


ditto. 


Ditto 


ditto. 


Ditto 


ditto. 


Ditto 


ditto. 


Ditto 


ditto. 


Ditto 


ditto. 


Ditto 


ditto. 


Ditto 


ditto. 


Ditto 


ditto. 


Ditto 


ditto. 


Ditto 


ditto. 


Ditto 


ditto. 


Ditto 


ditto. 


Ditto 


ditto. 


Ditto 


ditto. 


Ditto 


ditto. 


Ditto 


ditto. 


Ditto 


ditto. 


( Sumwut 1878 (a.d. 
1821), Kartiek 
I Soodh 15th. 



Kattiawar Agency— Okhamundul— Wo. L. 139 



No. L. 

Tkanslation of an Aoeeement executed by Rana Sheee Suggaeamjee of Aeamea and 
KooEE Babjee of Bate by the Agency of Adekaeee Suddaeam, renouncing in future 
PiEACY and all Eight to Weecks. 

I, Rana Shree Suggaramjee of Aramra, do hereby bind myself to this 
writing-, which includes Bate and Aramra, and what is here written I agree 
to abide by. 



Seal of 

Kooer Babjee 

of Bate. 



(Sd.) (Sahee) by Rana Suggaramjee. 



Be it known to all that 1, Kooer Babjee of Bate, by the agency of 
Adekaree Suddavam, in order to affoi-d the fullest testimony of respect and 
attachment to the Honourable Company, do engage and bind myself, my 
heirs and successors, to observe the following Articles of Agreement concluded 
by Adekaree Suddaram on my part, and by Major Alexander Walker on the 
part of the Honourable Company: — 

Article 1. 

Whereas the duty of protecting those who travel or trade by land extends 
equally to those who travel and trade by sea, I do, in like manner, for myself, 
my heirs and successors, engage not to permit, instigate, or connive at any act 
of piracy being committed by any person living under my authority, or 
subject to my control, nor shall those who follow the profession of piracy 
receive protection or assistance in my ports. I do also bind myself to the 
relinquishment of the practice of adding to the distress of the unfortunate, 
and will accordingly afford every possible assistance to vessels in distress, and 
renounce all claims to wrecks, to which an owner, capable of proving his right, 
may appear. 

Article 3'. 

The Honourable Company's vessels and subjects shall at all times have 
admission into my ports for the purpose of carrying on freely trade and 
commerce ; and those merchants and traders who are subject to my authority 
shall, in like manner, be allowed to visit and to trade in the countries and 
harbours of the Honourable Company. 

Article 3. 
As the temple of Bate is consecrated to the worship and adoration of the 
Supreme Being, the Honourable Company will be always disposed to afford 
the temple for those holy purposes every suitable encouragement and 
protection. 



140 Kattiawar Agency— Okhamundul— Wo. L, 

Article 4. 

It is further agreed to by me that to p'revent all future causes of dispute 
or of misunderstanding, the Honourable Company may appoint Soonderjee 
Sewajcc, or one of his connexions, to reside at Bate, and from time to time 
cause one of their (Company's Sircar) vessels to visit the port, and make siieh 
inspections as may be necessary, to ascertain that all these Articles are observed 
inviolably. 

Margsur SoorUi 15t//, Sumwut 1864, or HLh December A.B. 1807. 

(A true copy of the translate.) 

(Sd) AUCHIBALD ROBEETSON. 



Seal of 
Raiduiigee. 



Tbanslation of a copy of a Security Bond excciiced by Dewan Htjnseaj Sha on the 
part of Rao Shbee Raidun of Kutch for the Chiei' of Bate and Dewaeka. 

In consequence of Major Alexander Walker, on account of the Honour- 
able Company, having, through the agency of Khetree Soonderjee Sewajee, 
concluded friendship, and entered into a written agreement with Kooer 
.Mamunjee of Bate, through the agency of Suddaram and Mooloo Manick 
of Dewarka, I, Maharajah Rao Shree Raidun, by the agency of Hunsraj Sha 
Samedass Dewan, agree to become guarantee for the due observance of these 
engagements, and do hereby bind myself as answerable for the least aggression 
or theft on their part to the Honourable Company. This is. true. I have be- 
come security with my own free-will and consent. I am perfectly bound to 
cause an adherence to this. 

Dated Fons Soodh Wi, Friday, Sumwui 1864<. 

This has been executed in my presence. 

(True copy of the translate.) 

(Sd.) Aechibald Robertson. 



A precisely similar engagement was executed by Mooloo Manick Sumeanee 
of Dewarka, for which the Dewan of Kutch was security as above. 

A precisely similar engagement (omitting Articles 3 and 4 and thfe 
Security Boud) was taken from Wagha Manick of Dhingay. 



Kattiawar Agency— Joonagurh— No, LI. 



141 



Also (omitting Article 3) from Kooer Meghrajee of Positra, for which 
the Chiefs of Bate and Dewarka were security as in following bond : — 



Seal of 

Manumjee, 

son of 

Balijee. 



Teanslation of a Secueity Bond executed by Kooee Babjee of Bate and Mooloo 
Manick of Dewaeka for the Chief of Positea. 

I, Kooer Shree Babjeej by the agency of Suddaram Adekaree, and I, 
Mooloo Manick Sumeanee, in consequence of Positra^ having concluded 
arrangements with the Honourable English Company similar to those 
of Bate and Dewarka^ with a view to cause a due observance of these engage- 
ments, hereby become security, and if the Chief of Positra commit any 
aggression or theft, we are responsible for the same. Should the Positra- 
wallah any way commit aggressions, the whole of them (are on our necks) 
we are answerable for. 



Dated Fous Soodh 2nd, Sumwut 1864. 



(Signed twice.) 
Saheb. 
Sai-iee. 



No. LI. 



1230. 

Atbar Shah 

Badshah Ghazee's 

Servant Sher 

Khan Bahadoor 

Bahee. 



To Shree Sircar Honourable Company Bahadoor writes Nawab Baha- 
door Khan (of Joonagurh) that a right called Joretulubee (forced collection) 
leviable by moolookgeeree every year from Hallar, Kattywar (Proper), Gohel- 
war, and Jhalawar pertains to me. At the time Colonel Walker was carrying 
out the settlement of the province, I passed a writing to government, agree- 
ing that those States or talookas who might adjust the demand against them 
through government should be charged accordingly. I also hereby submit 
to government that I am desirous of having a settlement made of the Jore- 
tulubee, and the amount recovered every year from Sumwut 1878 (a.d. 1821- 
23) in perpetuity according to the government's wish, and that of the sum 
realized every year on account of the Joretulubee, four annas per Rupee 



142 Kattiawar Agency— Joonagurh— No. LII. 



should be received by government as charges on account of horsemenj foot- 
men^ &c., and the remainder paid to me. I pass this agreement. 

Bated Sumwut 1878, Malta Soodh IQlIi (1st Fehnmry 1821^. 



Mooruttub 
Shood 

or 
Finis. 



No. LII. 



TsANSLATiojf of an Ageeement executed by Hamed Khan Bahadooe, renouncing in 
future PiEACT and all Eight to Weecks. 

Be it known to all that I, Hamed Khan Bahadoor Babee Fidwee Shah 
Alum Badshah Ghazee, Governor of the city of Joonagurh, in order to afford 
the fullest testimony of respect and attachment to -the Honourable Company, 
do engage and bind myself, my heirs and successors, to observe the following 
Articles of Agreement concluded by me and by Major Alexander Walker, 
Resident, on the part of the Honorable Company : — 

Akticle 1. 

Whereas the duty of protecting those who travel or trade by land extends 
equally to those who travel or trade by sea, I, Hamed Khan Bahadoor, on 
my own part, and on the part of my heirs and successors, ,do in like manner 
engage not to permit, instigate, or connive at any act of piracy being com- 
mitted by any person living under my authority, or subject to my control, 
nor shall those who follow the profession of piracy receive protection or 
assistance in my ports ; and should any one being rebel against my govern- 
ment, and living in another country, enter mine and plunder any one, I will 
point out the residence of that thief. 

I, Hamed Khan Bahadoor, do also bind myself to the relinquishment of 
the practice of adding to the distress of the unfortunate, and will accordingly 
afford every possible assistance to vessels in distress, and renounce all claim 
to wrecks, to which an owner, capable of proving his right, may appear. 

Akticle 3. 

The Honourable Company's vessels and subjects shall at all times have 
admission into my ports for the purposes of carrying on freely trade and 
commerce; and those merchants and traders who are subject to my authority 
shall in like manner be allowed to visit and to trade in the harbours of the 
Honourable Company. 



Kattiawar Agency— Joonagurh— No. LIII. 143 



I have agreed to these Articles that no cause of misunderstanding or 
dispute may exist between me and the Honourable Company. 

Without date. 



The Seal of 

Hamed Khan 

Bahadoor, 



No. LIII. 

Tjjanslation of the annexed Papee, viz., to the Honoiteable the English East India 
Company from Nawab Sheeb Bahadooe Khan Bahadooe Babee of the Talooka 

of JOONAGUEH. 

To wit, — the Jemadar Oomur and other Arab Sebundy having become 
headstrong, I addressed a petition to the (said) Sircar, and in its favour a 
force was deputed, and all the arrangements required have been carried into 
effect in the most effectual manner by Captain Ballantine, and (whereupon) 
I do in my own pleasure enter into certain engagements with the (said) 
Sircar as in the following Articles : — 

Article 1. 
The Sicar's force having come to my aid, every arrangement was thereby 
effected to the utmost of my satisfaction and wishes, and the said Captain 
(Ballantine) shall address the Governor in Council in Bombay on the sum to 
be obtained on account of the expenses of the force, when, agreeable to the 
orders of the Sircar, whatever sum is fixed on in due faith shall be paid. 

AUTICLfi 2. 

And the payment of the above sum of expenses on account of the force 
shall be made available from the sum of recoveries on account of my moolook- 
geeree dues, to be made by him (the said Captain Ballantine) on the part of 
the Honourable Company, to commence from Sumwut J.873, a.d. 1816-17, 
and agreeable to the instalments to be agreed on. 

Article 3. 

My moolookgeeree circuit (or forceable collection) to be realized yearly, 
and in perpetuity, by the Honourable Company, on which duty let my agent 
be present, and. when occasion shall require, a force shall be supplied from my 
Sircar. 

Article 4. 
From the pergunnahs of Dundooka, Uanpore, and Gogo, &c., situated in 
the Honourable Company's talooka, and from the first period of becoming so 



144 Kattiawar Agency— Joonagurh — No. LIII. 



they have been subject to a yearly jummabundee to my Sircar; the same is 
therefore from that date and for ever, on the score of friendship, hereby 
annulled. 

Article 5. 

And whereas for the expenses of an Agency one lakh of corries shall 
yearly and for ever be paid, and in behalf thereof, Jaitpore (is ceded) as a 
residence, in which I have a share with the Balooches, besides my share also 
of the ten following villages belonging to ti)is pergunnah, and whose respective 
products, according to the realizations made by me, are all and severally hereby 
and for ever made over ; do you therefore credit the same sum, viz., yearly corries 
(as heretofore realized) 37,000 so ceded, and besides which, to make up the 
sum of corries one lakh, leaves a balance of sixty-three thousand (63,000) to 
be made good yearly from the receipts of my moolookgeeree collections. The 
following are the ten Jaitpore villages, viz. : — 

My share and the Balooches, both of Jaitpore — 

Each 4 of Sumundey Alloc. 

Do. 4 of Akaloo. « 

Do. 4 of Dadevever. 

Do. 4 of Khiresroo. 

Do. 4 of Sanklie. 

Do. 4 of Mohunpore. 

Do. 4 of Daridee. 

Do. 4 both of shares Belooches of Goondaloo. 

Do. 4-of Sirdarpore. 

Do. 4 of Peeplayoo. 

Aetiole 6. 

And (whereas) Arabs hitherto employed are not to be employed again, 
but when the Jemadar Oomur was headstrong, at that time Jemadar Hyhcha 
did me great service, on which occasion I gave him my lasting assurance of 
employment ; but at present as the subject has become matter of particular 
interest with the Sirqar, the said Jemadar shall, in the course of twelve mouths, 
be dismissed, and should the Arabs, within the specified period, commit any 
fault, I hold myself responsible for the same. 

Article 7. 
And (whereas) the aforegoing engagements have been entered into with 
the (Company's) Sircar; let the same be duly acted up to, and to the end of 
giving due effect to these friendly relations, I have, as well as Captain 
Ballantine, rendered to each other reciprocal assurance and satisfaction. 

Donemi/iei/earl87Z,A.D. 1816 and 1817, WaishacJc Soodli, May Uh, 
or Uh of the month of Jemadi Sani Sun, 1831 Hegira, 



Kattiawar Agency— Joonagurh— No. LIV. 



145 



SuNNUD from the Nawab of Joonaotjeh, ceding certain Eevenues to the Honoueable 

Company. ' 



Large 
Seal of the 
Nawab of 
Joonagurh. 



In the 4tli Article of the Agreement which I formerly executed in 
writing to government (dated the 2nd May 1816), the revenues (jumma- 
bundee) which I used annually to derive from Dundooka, Ranpore, and Gogo 
were given up in perpetuity to government^ as a mark of friendship, from the 
date on which the Honourable Company exercised jurisdiction thereon, to 
which effect a written instrument was executed through the intervention of 
Captain Ballantine, but as Dollerah was not specified therein, I have now, at 
the suggestion of the same ofBcer, in compliance with the wishes of Govern- 
ment, likewise ceded to Government in a friendly manner the revenues accru- 
ing to me from the said village. 

Bated the llth of Choitro Vud, Sumiout 1872, borresponding with the ISth 
April 1817. 



Small 

Seal of tlie 

Nawab. 



No. LIV. 

Engagement entered into on the 3rd January 1838 hy the Nawab of Joonastjeh for the 
SuppEESSioN of Suttee within his Jueisdiction. 

After compliments. — The cause of writing to you is this. A certain 
Bhattianee having arrived from Bombay and committed suttee at Pragrye, and 
the Sircar having issued oi'ders preventive of such a practice, a mohsul is upon 
me in order to make me answerable ; and the particulars of this subject (the 
suttee) having been reported to government, and it having been considered as 
a first instance of the kind, for which reason I have been pardoned, I give this 
writing to the effect that from henceforward such measures in the talooka 
will be taken so that no person will be allowed to become suttee in future. 
But if such should hereafter occur, I am responsible to any extent the Sircar 
may pronounce against, me. 



Seal 
of the 
Nawab. 



A similar engagement was made with the Seedee of Jafferabad. 
IV 19 



146 Kattiawar Agency— Joonagurh—Wos, LV. & LVI. 



No. LV. 

Tbanslation of a Yad from His Highness the Nawab of Joonagueh, to A. Malet, Esq., 
Political Agent in Katttwae, dated tlie 19tli March 1846. 

Your letter and His Highness the Guik war's agreement of the 19th 
Shuval have been received. His Highness the Eao (of Kutch) made an 
arrangement relative to the customs on boats, and you on the above mentioned 
Yad wrote your order, requiring me to make a similar engagement. 

My reply is, that according to the copies which you sent here, I have 
sent copies of them to all my Bunders, Verawul, Mangrol, &c., with orders 
to abide by it. 

Bated Siimwut 1902, Falgoon Fuel 1th (March 19th A.B. 1848). 



No. LVI. 



Ageeement entered into by the Joonaqtteh Durbar for the construction of a Telegeaph 

Line. 

Whereas the State of Joonagurh is desirous of having a line of telegraph 
constructed from Dhorajee to Joonagurh, to be worked in connection with 
the British lines of telegraph, the following terms are agreed upon by Colonel 
William Warden Anderson, Political Agent in Kattywar, on the part of the 
British Government, duly empowered by the Viceroy and Governor-General 
of India in Council on that behalf, and by His Highness Sir Mohobat Khan- 
jee, K.C.S.I., Nawab of Joonagurh: — 

1. The British Government agrees to construct for the Joonagurh State 
a line of telegraph, corfsisting of one wire, to be carried on standards to be 
erected between Dhorajee and Joonagurh at a cost of Rupees (14,000) 
fourteen thousand more or less, and the State of Joonagurh agrees to pay to 
the British Government the cost of the line as the money may be required. 

2. The receipts obtained by the opening of the Joonagurh Telegraph 
Office shall belong exclusively to the British Government, who shall defray 
the entire cost of repairing, maintaining, and working the telegraph line 
between Dhorajee and Joonagurh ; but when the receipts of the Office fall 
short of the cost of repairs, maintenance, and working, the State of Joona- 
gurh agrees to make good the deficiency ; should there, on the other hand, 
be a surplus left after payment of all expenses, such surplus shall be handed 
over by the British Government to the State of Joonagurh. 

3. With the consent of the Governor-General in Council extra wires 
may at any time be added by the Telegraph Department for the Joonagurh 
State on terms and conditions to be agreed upon at the time between the 
Joonagurh State and the Government of India, 

4. The line shall be called " The Joonagurh Branch Telegraph Line," 
and shall be managed and worked entirely by the officers of the British 
Telegraph Department. It shall not be dismantled without the consent of 



Kattiawar Agency— Nowanuggur— No. LVII. 147 

the British Government, but should it at any time be given up the materials 
of which it is composed shall become the property of the Joonagurh State. 

5. The accounts of the telegraph line shall be rendered yearly to the 
State of Joonagurh, and the balance shall be adjusted without delay. 

6. The State of Joonagurh agrees to apply to the Joonagurh Telegraph 
line the provisions of the British Telegraph Act VIII. of 1860, and such 
other Acts or legal provisions as have been, or may hereafter be, passed by the 
British Government with reference to the telegraphs. 

7. The State of Joonagurh agrees to apply to the Joonagurh Tdegraph 
line any rules or regulations that are now, or may hereafter be, made applicable 
to the lines of telegraph in British India. The British Government will 
undertake to furnish the Joonagurh State with accurate translation of such 
Acts, Rules, and Regulations. 

8. The State of Joonagurh agrees that the Joonagurh Telegraph line 
shall be opened to the inspection and supervision of the Director-General of 
Telegraphs and of any oflScer deputed by him for that purpose. 

(Sd.) W. W. Andeeson, Col,- 

Political Agent, Kattywar. 

Signed in Native character, i.e. 

(Sd.) Sib Mohobat Khanjee, K.C.S.I., 
The 20tA July 1874. Nawab Sakeb of Joonagurh. 



No. LVII. 



Teanslation of an Ageeembnt executed by Jam Jussajbe of NowANuaeuE renouncing 
in future Pieact and all Right to Weecks. 

Be it known to all that I, Jam Jussajee, in order to afford the fullest 
testimony of respect and attachment to the Honourable Company, do engage 
and bind myself, my heirs and successors, to observe the following Articles of 
Agreement concluded by me on my part, and by Major Alexander Walker on 
the part of the Honourable Company : — ' 

ARTICLE 1. 

Whereas the duty of protecting those who travel or trade by land extends 
equally to those who travel and trade by sea, I, Jam Jussajee of Nowanuggm-, 
do in like manner for myself, my heirs and successors, engage not to permit, 
instigate, or connive at any act of piracy being committed by any person 
living under my authority, or subject to my control, nor shall those who 
follow the profession of piracy receive protection or assistance in my ports. 
I, Jam Jussajee, do also bind myself to the relinquishment of the practice of 
adding to the distress of the unfortunate, and will accordingly afford every 
possible assistance to vessels in distress, and renounce all claim to wrecks, to 
which an owner capable of proving his right may appear. 



148 Kattiawar Agency— Mowanuggur— No. LVIII. 

Article- 3. 

The Honourable Company's vessels and subjects shall at all times have 
admission into my ports for the purposes of carrying on freely trade and 
commerce ; and those merchants and traders virho are subject to my authority 
shall in like manner be allowed to visit and to trade in the countries and har- 
bours of the Honourable Company. 

Bated Pous Fud 2)Wi Sumwut 1864, or lllh January A.D. 1808. 

(Sd.) RUDKAJEB RUGOONATHJBB, 

/or Jam Jussajeb. 

A precisely similar engagement was taken from Khowas Suggaram and 
Pragjee of Joriabundur. 



No. LVIII. 

Memoeandum of Articles, acquiescence in which was demanded from the Jam of NowA- 
NUGauE on the 23rd February 1812, and which was unreservedly given by that Chief 
on the same day. 

Article 1. 

The pecuniary demands of His Highness Mirza Rao Roydhtin, of Kutch, 
must be answered according to an equitable decision. 

Article 2. 

The whole of the port of Suryah, with its original boundaries, must be 
given up to the Guikwar government ; the produce, whatever it is found to 
be, will be included in a lakh of Rupees, to be added to your annual tribute. 
The revenue derivable by Khumbalia to be still realized upon the merchants 
of that place as formerly, and also upon goods sold by the Suryah people 
in IChumbalia. 

Article 3. 

The fort of Morpore must be destroyed. 

Article 4. 

The Arab foreign sebundy must be discharged, and only 800 of the 
oldest servants retained. 

Article 5. 

As security for the Kutch corries and for the discharge of the sebundy, 
and their never being re-entertained, Fukeer Mahomed and Kurreem Shah, 
the principal Sirdars, must be securities. Should there ever be occasion to 
entertain sebundy^ the permission of government must be obtained. 

Article 6. 
For the expense .of the army 15 lakhs of corries are requisite. 



Eattiawar Agency— Nowanuggur— Wo. LVIII. 149 

Article 7. 
The people who killed a British officer at Gope to be given up without 
reserve, and the gun and horse carried away to be restored. 

AUTIOLB 8. 
A fine of Rupees 5,000 to be paid for a breach of the infanticide engage- 
ments, and Bhat Charun security given to prevent infanticide in Nuggur and 
its dependencies. 

Akticie 9. 

The pergunnah of Surufdar must be returned to the Dherol family when 
the Company's Bahandary has expired ; security given to this effect. 

Article 10. 

The Girass of any Girassia that may have been bought or forced from 
the owner without the permission of government since the year 1864 (a.d. 
1807) to be returned. 

Article 11. 

The pergunnah of Ranpore, fort and town, in all twelve villages, must 
be given to Koonwur Sutajee, and the jummabundee payable to government 
to be decided by the Guikwar. The expense attendant on Sutajee seeking 
the Guikwar's protection, reckoned at Rupees 8,000, with any pi-operty of 
Sutajee's mother in the Jam's possession, to be returned upon oath; also 
Koonwur Sutajee's property which may have been kept. 

Article 12. 

The nuzzerana to His Highness Futteh Sing, amounting to Rupees 
25,000, to be paid. 

Article 13. 

Fa'el Zamin of Bhat and Charun to be given to the satisfaction of 
government. 

Article 14. 

One village to be given to Najee Jemadar in addition to his former one. 

Article 15. 

Any Baharwutias who may be in Nuggur to be sent to camp, where 
their business will be settled, never to be protected again. 

Article 16. 

All property stolen from the allied army in the Nuggur talooka to be 
restored. 

Article 17. 

A fine of one lakh to the Guikwar government for being compelled to 
erect batteries against Nuggur. 

Sahee (signature of the Jam). 



150 Kattiawar Agency— Nowanuggur—Ifo. LVIII. 

Teanslation of a Deed of Fa'el Zamin* executed by Bhaeote Mbeoo Mettah, Inhabi- 
tant of VBEBTrM&AUM, and Ramdass Ndthoo, Inhabitant of Juison, in tlie Petladd 
Pbe&unnah, to the Siecak of Shbeemunt Eao Sheeb Sbna Khas Khbyl Shumshee 
Bahadooe, Palgoon Vud 2nd 1868, 29th Fel>ruary 1812. 

We do of our own free will and pleasure become permanent Fa'el Zamin 
for Jam Jussajeej of Nowanuggur, as follows ; — 

Article 1. 

He shall not enter into internal disputes, afford refuge to any Baliarwutias 
Katty or Rajpoot ; he shall not encourage quarrels or encroach upon others' 
boundaries, but shall permit them to remain as they may have been from 
ancient times. Should any of the Bayaud offer his land or village, he shall 
not accept of it; in any way he shall not offer any injury on account of 
former quarrels ; he shall harbour no robbers, else he must do so with proper 
securities ; no robberies are to be committed in the talookas or in the roads. 
Should any person, from interested motives, offer his land or village for sale, 
it is not to be purchased or sold without the previous permission of the Sircar. 

Article 2. 

He shall not write with any enemies of the Guikwar or Company's 
government. 

Article 3. 

He shall permit no robberies, attacks, or plundering parties in the mehals 
of the government of Shreemunt Punt Purdhan, the Guikwar, and the 
Honourable Company. He shall allow of no injury being offered to mer- 
chants or travellers, to whom he is to give guides and escorts through his own 
districts. Any loss suffered by merchants, &c., shall be answered for by the 
village people in whose land it occurs, and the talookdar shall answer for the 
conduct of his villages or shall trace the robbers. 

Article 4. 

If he has possessed himself of any lands or village of an inferior zemindar 
it shall be released,and a just accommodation take place and the dispute cease. 



Article 5. 

In the year 1868 (1813,) he engaged with the Sircar not to entertain 
more than 300 Arabs as foreign sebundy. Should he require more, he shall 



* Separate security was taken for nearly every article of the engagement of 23rd February 
1812, but, with exception of tlie Fa'el Zamin, they were all temporary, aud it has therefore been 
thought unnecessary to load this volume with them. 



Kattiawar Agency— Nowanuggur— No. LVIII. 



151 



ask the permission of government, and if it is desired he is not to retain 
others. 

These are upon our heads and we shall pay all Mohsuls. 

The above is true. 

(Sd.) Bhauotb Meeoo Mettah ] 

MuTTOo X / their 

(Sd.) Bhaeote Ramdass Nuthoo X marks. 
MuTTOO X ) 



Large 
Seal. 



Teanslation of a PEBGrNNAH from the SiBCAE of Sheee Rao Sheee Antjnd Kao Guik- 
WAE Sena Khas Khetl Shumshee Bahadooe, to Jam Jessajee of Nowanuggtjb 
Talooka. 

You behaved in an unbecoming manner, which caused the Khas army 
and a large force on the part of the Honourable Company Bahadoor to enter 
your country. Every endeavour was made to effect an accommodation, but 
these having failed, in order to keep you in remembrance (of the past), your 
jummabundee has been increased by one lakh of Rupees annually, inclusive 
of the produce of the port of Suryah, from the year 1869, a.d. 1813. 
Should, however, your future conduct be such as is approved of by the allied 
government after a period of ten years, they may be induced to reduce in 
some proportion this increased demand. 

Falgoon Soodh XUh, 1868 (lUh Felrmry 1812;. 



MORTUB ShOOD. 



Seal. 



Tbanslation of a Deed executed by the Siecae of Eao Sheee Anund Rao Gttikwab Sena 
Khas Khbtl Shumshee Bahadooe in favor of Jam Jessajee of Nowantjggtje. 

The Sircar have taken the port of Suryah in the Nuggur talooka entire, 
and free from all other demands, in consequence of your unbecoming conduct. 
In this jnanner you have given it in writing. 

No trouble will be offered to your talooka by the garrison of the Sircar 
in that post, such as orders, horsemen, footmen, mohsuls, travellers to and 
from, &c., except in the articles of grass and wood ; our garrison will not 
listen to any. complaint made by your ryots, and no trouble offei'ed by the 
thannah. Our garrison will not protect any of your criminals. 



152 Kattiawar Agency— Wowanuggur & Bhownuggur— Nos. LIX. & LX. 



Merchants belonging to Khumbalia carrying goods from Suryah to the 
former place sball pay you the usual taxeSj and the same with respect to the 
Suryah merchaat vending goods in Khumbalia. 

Merchants of Suryah carrying goods from Suryah past the vicinity of 
Khumbalia will pay you the usual petty road taxes. Robbers, &c., of your 
talooka shall not trouble the Bunder or its merchants, nor shall the passage of 
goods through the country be in any way obstructed. 

Should any merchants be robbed of property (which has paid Khumbalia 
road tax) in your' territory, you shall cause restitution, and if the robbers 
belong to another district, you shall point out the place to which they belong. 

The Sircar may populate and otherwise increase the Bunder ; no obstacles 
are to be presented to this. 

The Sircar affords cowl for what is written above, and the Bahandary of 
Captain James Rivett CarnaCj Resident on the part of the Honourable 
Company, is attached. 



Falgoon Soodh Ut/i (%Uh February 1812;. 



MouTUB Shood. 



Seal. 



No. LIX. 



Tkanslation of a Note from His Highness Jam Eunmuljee of Nowanuogub to 
A. Malet, Esq., Political Agent in Katttwae, dated 22nd March 1846, Palgoon 
Vud 10th Sumwut 1902). 

Your Yad, with the copy of the rules for exempting vessels driven into 
port by stress of weather, was received, and we had some conversation on the 
subject when you were at Nowanuggur. I now write in this Yad that I will 
abide by those rules, and will send orders to my Bunders : this is written for 
your information. 



No. LX. 



Tbanslation of a Whiting passed on the 31st January 1773 between Dewjee Eesil and 
Wagjee Desst in behalf of Eawtjl Beek Sing, Eajah of Bhowntjggub, to 
William Andeew Peice, Esq., Chief for Affaies of the Beitish Nation, and 
GovEENOE of the Moghitl's Castle and Fleet at Stjeat. 

The Nawab Momin Khan, of Cambay, having been at Baroach, and fully 
empowered William Andrew Price, Esq., to treat with the Rajah of Bhow- 
nuggur for the surrender of the fort of Toolajee to him, we Dewjee Resil 
and Wagjee Dessy, being sent by the same Rajah, fully empowered by 
him to enter into an agreement for the said fort, have by this writing 



Kattiawar Agency— Bhownuggur— No. LXI. 153 



settled that it shall be delivered to the Rajah for the sum of Rupees seventy- 
five thousand, which the said William Andrew PricCj on the part of the 
Nawab, agrees to, and which we, the said Dewjee Resil and Wagjee Dessy, 
also agree to : and whereas the Nawab, having made good to the Honourable 
English East India Company the sum of Rupees twenty-five thousand in part 
payment of the said fort, we, the said Dewjee Resil and Wagjee Dessy, on 
the part of the said Rajah, agree that at the expiration of one month after 
delivery of the fort to the Rajah, with the same guns and stores as the 
Nawab received from the English, to make good to him the sum of Rupees 
twenty-five thousand; and with respect to the balance of Rupees iifty 
thousand due to the Honorable Company, we agree to make it good in annual 
payment of Rupees fifteen [thousand until the whole is discharged. In this 
there is not to be any difference. 

Bated in BaroacJt,, the Ith Zelimdah, in the year of the Hegira 1186, or 
the ^\st January 1773. 



(Sd.) Dewjee Resil. 
W agjee Dessy. 



We confirm the above. 

(Sd.) Daniel Draper. 

John Watson. 
Robert Garden. 
Bruce Elbtcher. 
William Shaw. 
Robert Gordon. 
Benjamin Lewis. 
William Tayler. 



No. LXI. 



Deeo passed on the 8tli November 1808 to Major Aiexandee Walker, Resident at 
Baeoda, on behalf of the Hon oueable Company, by Rawtjl Wukhut Sing, Tha- 
KooE of Bhownitggue, and his son Eoonwije Witje Sing, namely — 

A bond executed.to the Sircar of the Maharajah Anund Rao Guikwar 
Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor, by which, through the medium and 
on the security of Bharote Umar Jugrope, we became bound to make good 
the yearly dues of our talook, amounting to Rupees 74,500 (khurajaat in- 
clusive), at Baroda, for the period of ten years, and by a separate agreement 
from us, we also engaged for the perpetual payment of the same. 

Now the said revenue of Rupees 74,500 being transferred from the Sircar 
of Anundo Rao Guikwar to the Honourable Company, I do hereby bind 
IV 20 



154 Kattiawar Agency— Bhownuggur— Ho. LXI. 



myself, and my heirs and successors, from generation to generation, to make 
good to them or their assignees, in each year, as follows ; — 

1 Kist 

1 Do. 

1 Do. 



Magsur . , . 


... 24,834 


Pons 


... 24,833 


Magh 


... 24,833 



Kupees 74,500 

The said instalments being to be paid in the currency of Surat, 

This engagement is renewable at the expiration of ten years from the 
3'ear (1865, 1808-09) inclusive; and according to the terms of this engage- 
ment, I do promise to abide for myself, my heirs and successors, so long as 
my present possessions may remain with me; the said Rupees 74,500 being 
in full of all moolookgeeree demands whatever on my talook, either from the 
Peishwa's or Guikwar's government ; and in ease I do not pay at the stated 
periods of instalments, I do promise to pay at a rate of interest 1 per cent, 
per month. 

Bated Suimaut 1865, ^th Karlick Vud, or A. D. %th November 1808. 

The above is truth. 

Rawul Wtjkhut Sing. 



PeeWjCnnah from SfiJOB Alhxandee Walkeb, in behalf of the Honoueable Compant, 
to EawOl WtTKfftFT SiNO, Thakoob of BHowNUQGtrE, and hia son Koonwue Wuje 
Sure, to wit, dated 8th November 1808. 

Having, under date the 2nd Kartick Soodh 1864, (1st November 1807,) 
executed an agreement to the Sircar, binding yourself to pay to the Honour- 
able Company the annual amount of your jummabundee and khurajaat, and 
which engagement is renewable in ten years from 1865 inclusive, therefore, 
pursue the cultivation of your district with confidence, and pay your jumma- 
bundee and khurajaat according to youi" bond, as the kists become due; being 
for the following districts .• — 

1. Oomrala Loleeana. 

2. Talooka Muhwa and Bhauvur. 

3. „ Dehore. 

4. „ Talaja, &c. 

5. Talookas Julalpore, Marva, Dhusa, Lathia. 

6. Talooka Ajmer. 

7. „ Wagnuggur. 

8. Mouza Nily Godrun, Ashodur, Sbeldy Amba, &o., belonging to Khavapat. 

9. Talookas Gudhura and Bhimrad. 

10. Mouza KajooUa. 

11. Talookas Sanbur and Koondala. 
13. Talooka Gondaloo. 



Kattiawar Agency— Bhownuggur— No. LXII. 155 



Should in any year any real distress occur, in that year the Sircar will 
consider the same. You have afforded perpetual Fa'el Zamin, according to 
which perfoma your engagement, and be assured of receiving on all just cases 
the protection of government. 

Neither the Peishwa's or Gnlkwar government will afford any molesta- 
tion in respect to the above jummabundeee, and should they so do, the Com- 
pany will answer the same. 

(Sd.) A. Walker, 

Bated 8tA November 1808. 



No. LXII. 



Ageeement, dated the 8th September 1840, between the Honotjeable East India 
Company and the Thakooe of Bhownuggue, Rawul Wujesingjee Witkhiix 
Singjee, having been concluded, has been made out in three parts, signed and sealed, 
whereof one part is to be deposited with the Goveenment of Bombay, one part with the 
Thaeoob, and one in the Office of the Collectoe of Ahmedabad, viz. : — 

Article 1. ' 

The Thakoor, for and in consideration of the sum of Company's Rupees 
(4,000) four thousand being paid to him by the said East India Company, and 
to be annually paid to him and his hereditary successors, agrees to relinquish 
all claims to any share in the land Or sea customs at Gogo. He also agrees to 
relinquish all claims to any duties under the name of " Abbaree " on tobacco 
or any other goods in that cusba. He further agrees to relinquish all claims 
to the Huk termed " Dullalee " and " Tojee Veera, " together with the Huk 
" Bham Veera " in the said Cusba-. The Thakoor, moreover, agrees to relin- 
quish all claims, and hereby acknowledges that he has no right to any Huk, 
Lawazums, Duty, &c., in Gogo Cusba, either from the East India Company 
or the East India Company's subjects, or to any arrears, on account of the 
above items, antecedent to the 1st December 1836. 

Article 2. 

And whereas an order was issued by the Honourable the Governor in 
Council of Bombay for stopping the coinage of money at Bhownuggur, now 
the Thakoor, in consideration of the annual payment to him and his hereditary 
successors by the East India Company of the sura of Company's Rupees 
(2,793-6-5) two thousand seven hundred and ninety-three six annas and five 
pies hereby agrees to relinquish all and every description of coining money of 
every kind, both at Bhownuggur and its dependent villages, as well as in his 
(the Thakoor's) Kattywar possessions, hereby binding himself to abstain from 
coining either copper, or any other sort of coin, both in the abovmentioned 
places and everywhere else, and moreover hereby renounces all claims on 
account of the said Mint arising antecedent to 1st December 1836. 



156 Kattiawar Agency— Bhownuggur—Ifo. LXIII. 

Under the above two Articles of Agreement, the East India Company 
consents to pay the Thakoor annually, commencing from the 1st December 
1836, the sum of Company's Rupees (6,793-6-5) six thousand seven, hundred 
and ninety-three six annas and five pies. 

In witness whereof we hereunto set our hands and seals, John Hinde 
Pelly, Collector of continental Customs and Excise, in behalf of the East 
India Company, on the one part and the Thakoor Eawul Wujesingjee on the 
other part, this eighth day of September, in the year of Our Lord one thou- 
sand eight hundred and forty, corresponding with Sumwut one thousand eight 
hundred and ninety-six, Bhadurwa Soodh twelfth. 

(Sd.) J. H. Pelly, 
Collector of Continental Customs and Esscise. 

This Agreement was confirmed by government on the 30th September 
1840, 



No. LXIII. 



Tkanslated Extbacts from a Letteb addressed hj the Thakooe of Bhownttgque to 
Aethue Malet, Esq, Political Agent in Katttwae, dated the 18th January 1846. 
Your letter, dated the 3rd January 1846, has been received, and its 
contents have been understood. You state " that there is a difficulty regard- 
ing the duties leviable on boats passing to and fro from Bombay to Sinde, 
or elsewhere, which are obliged by stress of weather or other cause to touch 
at any of my Bunders ; that injury is thereby done to facility of traffic : that 
government has taken the case of such boats under its favorable consideration j 
and that the Rao of Kutch, to meet the wishes of government, framed 
certam regulations on the subject, dated 1st December 1840: that a copv of 
these regulations was forwarded to me in a letter dated 17th October 1844. 
m which I ana informed that it is to my credit to make arrangements for 
preventing obstacles being thrown in the way of persons navigating boats, 
and that if I could make regulations at my Bunders similar to those which 
are in force at the Bunders of Kutch, it would be pleasing to government 
Zi^'^'fTJ: ^3^.r\^°*^^^^*^-" You have asked me to rfply to this 
Jettei. I am most willmg to pay every consideration to the wishes of govern- 
ZIC^? anxious to benefit the interests of my country, and I have therefore 
now sent a copy of the regulations m question to the Bunders of Mowa and 
Tolaja that they may be enforced. I have also given a copy to my mootsud- 
dee at this place, with instructions to act accordingly. ^ mooubuu 

Dated m Pous Fud 1902, corresponding with the im January 1846. 



Kattiawar Agency— Bhownuggur—Wos. LXIV. & LXV. 157 



No. LXIV. 

TeansIiAtion of a Yad from the Thakooe of Bhownttggue to Majoe W. Lang, Poli- 
tical Agent in Katttwae, dated the 20th December 1849. 

Arrangements having been formerly made for not levying the customs 
on vessels driven to and detained in any port on account of stress of weather 
or for any other similar reason v^hile going from Bombay to Kurrachee or 
any other Bunder, and vice versa, I wrote to you on the subject ; but I now 
beg to add that, according to the said arrangements, I shall not collect 
the sea customs on vessels belonging to the Sircar and to the different ports 
in Kattywar that may happen to come to my Bunders on account of stress 
of weather ; but His Highness the Rao of Kutch having only agreed to 
exempt vessels belonging to Kurrachee and Bombay from the payment of 
these customs, and not those belonging to other ports, I shall be obliged ta 
pay to him the duty on such vessels of my Bunders as may be driven into 
ports belonging to Kutch by stress of weather, and for this reason I shall 
also levy the same on vessels of Kutch agreeably to my ancient custom. 

Bated Sumwut 1906, JPous Soodli Qth, corresponding with the 20^^ Becemler 
A.B. 1849. 

Written by Suwall Lall Shamjee. 

MEMORANDUM. 

Similar engagements to the foregoing were entered into by the following 
additional Chiefs on the undermentioned dates : — 

His Highness the Jam of Nowanuggur ... J q^ ^^^ ^^^^ December 

„ „ JNawab or Joonagurh ... '> iq^q 

The Rana of Porebunder ... . . . ) 



The Seedee of Jafferabad 



On the 30th December 
184.9. 



No. LXV. 



Settlement framed according to Kesolittions of the Bombay Goveenment, Nob. 3826 

and 3829, dated 23rd October 1860. 

The following agreement between Her Majesty^s government and the 
Thakoor of Bhownuggur, Juswuntsingjee Bhowsingjee, having been con- 
cluded, has been made out and signed in three parts, of which one part will 
be deposited with Her Majesty's government of Bombay, one part with the 
Thakoor, and one part in the office of the Collector of Ahmedabad : — 

Article 1. 

The Thakoor agrees that the lease of the villages of his talooka in the 

districts of Dundooka, Ranpore, and Gogo, which was executed in a.h. 1848, 

shall be cancelled from and after May 1st, 1861. Instead thereof the 

Thakoor hereby agrees to pay for the whole of the villages enumerated 



158 Eattiawar Agency— Bhownuggur— No. LXV. 



in that lease a fixed jumma of Rupees 52,000 yearly for ever. This sum 
shall not be in any way afEected by the result of any action or other process 
"brought by any party against the Thakoor's right of possession in any part 
of the said talooka, nor shall the said estates, excepting Bhownuggur, with 
Wudwa, Sehore, and the 10 villages thereof about to be attached to Kattywar, 
be exempted, on account of this payment, from any other general taxation 
not coming under the head of land tax' or rental which government may 
impose on their districts under the regulations. 

Article 3. 

The whole of the Thakoor's claims upon government have been computed 
up to May 1st, 1861, to amount to Rupees 12,21,041-] 3-7. To this the 
Thakoor agrees. There is due from the Thakoor in revenue to government 
Rupees 12,71,062-11-0. This the Thakoor admits. The balance. Rupees 
60,020-13-5, the Thakoor agrees to pay into the Treasury before May 1st, 
1861. Except the annual sum of Rupees 6,890-2-2, compensation fixed in 
A.D. 1840 for the Thakoor's rights in Gogo and for his mint, no yearly or any 
other sum of compensation will remain due by government to the Thakoor 
after that date. From and after November 186€, the Thakoor agrees to pay 
up his Kattywar tribute yearly in full according to settlement. 

Article 3. 

The Thakoor agrees to the following, instead of the rules heretofore fol- 
lowed, in collecting customs in the port of Bhownuggur : — 

I. Government shall collect port dues at the same rates as in British 
ports, and after deducting expenses, shall hand the proceeds to the Thakoor. 

II. Government shall collect customs on trade to and from other than 
British ports on the continent of India at the same rates as may be from time 
to time imposed by the British Government In their own ports. After deduct- 
ing the necessary expenses, three-fifths shall be the share of the Thakoor and 
two-fifths the share of government. 

III. The tariff in use in British ports shall be adopted instead of that 
now in use. 

IV. Nothing in this agreement shall affect the articles of opium, spirits, 
and salt, which shall be dealt with as heretofore. 

Article 4. 

The Thakoor agrees to pay monthly into the Bhownuggur custom house 
the sum of Rupees 35 to cover the expense incurred by government in conse- 
quence of the opening of the port of Soondrye. 

Article 5. 

In consideration of the present settlement, the Thakoor agrees to abandon 
entirely his claims on the following subjects : — 

I. To compensation for loss caused by the imposition of an attachment 
by the Settlement Officer, Mr. Rogers, in a.d. 1854, 



Eattiawar Agency— Bhownuggur— No. LXV. 159 

II. To the restoration of the villages Khni-tir, Jhinjhtir, and Cher, or 
to a deduction from the Joonagurh Zoretulubee if they are not restored. 

III. To compensation for the loss caused by the closing of the harbour 
of Soondrye in a.d. 1808. 

IV. To a share in the customs and land revenue of Dhollerah, 

V. To a certain cess and a share in the land revenue of Bhowliaree, 

Aeticle 6. 

Government having consented to acknowledge the Thakoor's claim to a 
half share in the village of Pauvee in Dundooka^ if on investigation it appear 
that his right to it was not derived from the deceased Talookdar, a Kusbatee, 
the Thakoor agrees to accept a decision made on that understanding. 

Akticlb 7. 

Upon the above conditions Her Majesty's government agree as follows : 

Government concede as a favour, and not as a right, the transfer of 
Bbownuggur itself, with Wudwa, Sehore, and 10 subordinate villages, from 
the district of Gogo, subject to the regulations, to the Kattywar Political 
Agency. 

Government will not lay claim to the enam villages subordinate to 
Wurtej. 

Government will not enforce their rights in the ports of Mowa and 
Wagnuggur. 

Aeticle 8. 
Government have agreed to cancel the above quoted lease executed in 
A.v. 1840. It is therefore cancelled from May 1st, 1860, and government 
agree as a favour to take in future the yearly sum of Rupees 52,000 as the 
jumma of all the villages specified in the said lease. This sum shall not be 
liable to increase. 

Article 9. 

I. Government agree to admit Bhownuggur to the full benefits of a 
British port so far as the Thakoor may desire. 

II. On condition that the Thakoor abandons his claim to compensation 
for the sayer duties abolished in his talooka villages, government agree to 
abandon their present share in the customs, and will take only two-fifths of 
the net customs hereafter to be collected on trade to and from other than 
British ports on the continent of India. 

III. Government will collect the said customs according to the laws 
and tanfE from time to time in force for British ports, and hand to the Thakoor 
three-fifths of the proceeds after deducting the necessary expenses. 

IV. Government will collect port dues at the same rates as in British 
ports, and, deducting expenses, will hand over the whole proceeds to the 
Thakoor* 



160 Kattiawar Agency— Bhownuggur— Wo. LXVI. 

v. Government will not interfere in any way with such customs as 
the Thakoor chooses to levy on trade to and from British ports on the conti- 
nent of India. 

VI. Government agree that the Thakoor shall enjoy a remission of 
customs on his private trade to the amount of Rupees 1,000 yearly according 
to the British tariff. 

Article 10. 
_ Government agree the Thakoor shall open the port of Soondrye as a 
foreign port for the export of all articles the produce or manufacture of the 
continent of India, and for the import of such articles only as shall have been 
duly exported from a British port in the continent of India, except only that 
there shall be no traffic in spirits, salt, and opium. 

Article 11. 
Government will admit the Thakoor's claims to a half share in the village 
of Pauvee in Dundooka, if it appears on investigation that the right of the 
Thakoor is not derived from the Kusbatee Talookdar of the other half. 

In witness whereof we hereunto set our hands and seals this 22nd day of 
December eighteen hundred and sixty, Sumwut nineteen hundred and seven- 
teen, Margsur Soodh 10th. 

(Sd.) George Clerk. 

„ JUSWUNTSINGJEB BhOWSINGJEE. 



No. LXVI. 

Ageeement entered into by tte Bhowntj&gtje DuEBAEfor the CoNSTErcTioN and Mainte- 
nance of Tblegeaph Lines between Dholleeah and BHowNtraouE. 

Whereas the State of Bhownuggur is desirous of having a line of 
telegraph constructed from Dhollerah to Bhownuggur to be worked in con- 
nection with the British lines of telegraph, the following terms are agreed 
upon by James Braithwaite Peile, Esquire, Acting Political Agent in Katty- 
war, on the part of the British Government, duly empowered by the Viceroy 
and Governor-General of India in Council on that behalf, and by Edward Hope 
Percival, Esquire, and Gowrishunkur Udeyshunkur, Esquire, Joint Adminis- 
trators of the Bhovvnuggur State, on the part of the Bhownuggur State, duly 
empowered by the Administration of Bhownuggur on that behalf : — 

1 The British Government agrees to construct for the Bhownuggur 
State a line of telegraph consisting of one wire to be carried on standards to 
be erected between Dhollerah and Bhownuggur at a cost of Rupees (21,000) 
twenty-one thousand more or less, and the State of Bhownuggur agrees to 
pay to the British Government the cost of the line as the money may be 
required. 

2. The receipts obtained by the opening of the Bhownuggur Telegraph 
Office shall belong exclusively to the British Government, who shall defray 
the entire cost of repairing, maintaining, and working the telegraph hne 



Kattiawar Agency— Porebunder— No. LXVII. 161 

between Dhollerah and Bhownnggur, but when the receipts of the Office fall 
short of the cost of repairs, maintenance, and working", the State of Bhow- 
nuggur agrees to make good the deficiency ; should there, on the other hand, 
be a surplus left after payment of all expenses, such surplus shall be handed 
over by the British Government to the State of Bhownuggur. 

3. With the consent of the Governor-General in Council extra wires 
may at any time be added by the Telegraph Department for the Bhownuggur 
State on terms and and conditions to be agreed upon at the time between the 
Bhownuggur State and the Government of India. 

4. The line shall be called "the Bhownuggur Branch Telegraph Line/' 
and shall be managed "and worked entirely by the ofiicers of the British 
Telegraph Department. It shall not be dismantled without the consent of 
the British Government, but should it at any time be given up^ the materials 
of which it is composed shall become the property of the Bhownuggur State. 

5. The accounts of the telegraph line shall be rendered yearly to the 
State of Bhownuggur, and the balance shall be adjusted without delay. 

6. The State of Bhownuggur agrees to apply to the Bhownuggur Tele- 
graph line the provisions of the British Telegraph Act VIII. of 1860, and 
such other Acts or legal provisions as have been, or may hereafter be, passed 
by the British Government with reference to telegraphs. 

7. The State of Bhownuggur agrees to apply to the Bhownuggur Tele- 
graph line any rules or regulations that are now or may hereafter be made 
applicable to lines of telegraph in British India. The British Government 
will undertake to furnish the Bhownuggur State with accurate translations of 
such Acts, Rules, and Regulations. 

8. The State of Bhownuggur agrees that the Bhownuggur Telegraph 
line shall be opened to the inspection and supervision of the Director-General 
of Telegraphs and of any ofiicer deputed by him for that purpose. 

Bhownuggue, ^ (Sd.) J. B. Peile, 



.} 



The %'itrd January \%1^. ) Acting Political Agent, Kattywar. 



No. LXVII. 



Teanslation of an Ageeement executed by Eana Sietanjee and Kooee Hallajee of 
PoEEBTJNDTJE, renouncing in future Pieacy and all Eight to WbiJoks. 

Be it known to all that we, Rana Sirtanjee and Kooer Hallajee of 
Porebundur, in order to afford the fullest testimony of respect and attach- 
ment to the Honourable Company, do engage and bind ourselves, our heirs 
and successors, to observe the following Articles of Agreement concluded by 
us, Rana Sirtanjee and Kooer Hallajee of Porebundur, on our part, and by 
Major Alexander Walker on the part of the Honourable Company: — 

Aeticle 1. 
Whereas the duty of protecting those who travel or trade by land extends 
equally to those who travel and trade by sea, we^ Rana Sirtanjee and Kooer 

IV 21 



162 Kattiawar Agency— Porebunder— No. LXVIII. 

Hallajee of Porebundur, do in like manner for ourselves, oiir heirs and succes- 
sors, engage not to permit, instigate, or connive at any act of piracy being 
committed by, any person under onr authority, or subject to our control, nor 
shall those who follow the profession of piracy receive protection or assistance 
in our ports. We do also bind ourselves to the relinquishment of the practice 
of adding to the distress of the unfortunate, and will accordingly afford every 
possible assistance to the vessels in distress, and renounce all claims to wrecks 
to which an owner capable of proving his right may appear. 

Article 2. 

The Honourable Company's vessels and subjects shall at all times have 
admission into our ports for the purposes of carrying on freely trade and 
commerce ; and those merchants and traders vvho are subject to our authority 
shall in like manner be allowed to visit and to trade in the countries and 
harbours of the Honourable Company. 

AUTICLE 3. 

It is further agreed to by us that to prevent all future causes of dispute 
or misunderstanding, the Honourable Company may appoint an agent to reside 
at Porebundur, and from time to time cause one of their (Company's Sircar) 
vessels to visit the port and make such inspections as may be necessary to 
ascertain that all these Articles are observed inviolably. 



No. LXVIII. 

Aeticles of ENeAOEMENT from Eana Sietanjeb and KooBE Hallajee of Poeebundue 
to the Honoueable Company, dated the 5th December 1809. 

Article 1. 

Rana Sirtanjee and Kooer Hallajee agree to cede to the Honourable 
Company one-half of the port of Porebundur, with a full participation in all 
its rights. 

Article 2. 

In consideration of the above cession, the Honourable Company engage 
to take upon themselves the satisfaction of a part of the claims of the 
Guikwar government on Porebundur equal to the amount of Rupees (50,000) 
fifty thousand. 

Article 3. 

For the amount so advanced Rana Sirtanjee and Kooer Hallajee engage 
and do hereby transfer to the Honourable Company a mortgage, until the said 
Rupees 50,000, with its interests at 9 per cent, per annum, be fully paid. 

Article 4. 
The above arrangement places the State of Porebundur under the 
Bahandary and protection of the Honourable Company, who will assist and 
protect the rights and interests of Rana Sirtanjee and Kooer Hallajee in all 
just cases, and for this purpose they will station a Captain and 100 men in 
Porebundur. 



Kattiawar Agency— Jaflferabad— No. LXIX. 163 



Article 5. 

The demands of the Rana of Porebundur on the Kamdars and others^ 
and the demands of other places on Porebundur, will be decided by the 
Honourable Company in conformity to justice. The Rana Sirtanjee and 
Kooer Hallajee engage to abide by the Company's arbitration. 

Article 6. 

The above engagement is permanent between the Rana Sirtanjee, Kooer 
Hallajee, Kooer Prntheeraj, and their heirs and descendants, for ever, on one 
part, and the government of the Honourable Company on the other. 

Bone at Poreiunder, hth December A.B. 1809, corresponding with the l&tk 
Kartick Vud 1866 Sumwut. 

S'ahee, in the handwriting of Sirtanjee, 

Rana of Poreiundur, 



No. LXIX. 



Abticles of Ageeembnt witli Seedee Hillol, on the part of himself and tlie Inhabitants 
of Jaffekabad, dated the 3rd January 1761. 

Seedee Hillol professes himself a servant of Seedee Yacood Khan, of 
Jinjeerah, and faithfully promises obedience to all- lawful orders of the said 
Yacood Khan and his successors. 

Seedee Hillol having received many favours from the Honourable 
English Company, and being promoted to the Foujdary of JafEerabad 
by their interest and intercession with his master, Seedee Yacood Khan, 
to testify his gratitude to them, and to promote the welfare of the inhabitants 
of JafEerabad, has entered into the following Articles as the foundation of a 
firm and lasting peace, viz. : — 

Article 1. 

That a strict friendship is now entered into between the English in all 
parts of India and the inhabitants of JafEerabad, alias Musafarabad. 

Article 3. 

That no boats or vessels, with English passes and colours, shall be molest- 
ed on the high seas, or elsewhere, by those of JafEerabad ; and all JafEerabad 
trading boats, with Seedee Hillol's pass and 'colours, be treated as friends by 
the English. 

Article 3. 

All boats and vessels of both parties, being in distress, and going into 
the ports of one another, shall have all possible assistance afforded them, and 
liberty given to go away wheji they please, as is customary between friends. 



164 Kattiawap Agency— Jafferabad— No. IiXIX. 



AUTICLE 4. 

That the merchants of JBombay and Jafferabad have free liberty of trade 
to those and all other parts under their respective jurisdictions on paying such 
duties as are established now or may hereafter be settled. 

Article 5. 

That the Honourable Company's cruisers shall not be subject to anchorage, 
or any other fees of that nature, paid by merchants' boats. 

Article 6. 
The inhabitants of the adjoining country of Jafferabad often making use 
of the name of Jafferabad merchants, to get the Honourable Company's pass, 
and afterwards employ their boats in pirating, it is agreed that Seedee HiUol 
shall give letters to merchants only, and those such as he is well assured are 
fit to be trusted; and that none but such as produce his letters shall have the 
Honourable Company's pass granted them. 

Article 7. 

Seedee Hillol promises not to give his pass to any of the Jafferabad cruis- 
ing boats; not to those of Sultanpore, or any pirates whatever. 

Article 8. 
In case any Jafferabad boats are taken or detected in molesting, seizing, 
or plundering any vessel, with English pass and colours, the Honourable 
Company may treat such boats and their crews in what manner they please. 

Article 9. 

That Seedee Hillol will use his best endeavours to supply Bombay with 
live cattle, whenever occasion may require, they being paid for on delivery. 

Article 10. 

As Seedee Hillol is desirous of increasing the trade of Jafferabad, he has 
requested that the merchants of that place who shall procure his pass may be 
permitted to trade to Surat with freedom, and enjoy the privileges granted 
them many years since : it is agreed that the Honourable the President and 
Council shall recommend to the Chief and factors at Surat to procure from the 
government a full and free permission for their trading thither, and enjoying 
all their ancient privileges, taking care that they meet with no oppressions 
■whatever. 

Article 11. 

Seedee Hillol faithfully promises to use his endeavours to bring the 
Sultanpore Koolies to Articles of Agreement not to molest the ports of Broach 
Jamboseer, Cambay, Gogo, &c. ; and in case the Koolies will not be prevailed 
upon in this point, Seedee Hillol engages to join with us in an expedition 
against them ; he with his land forces, and we "with our fleet. 



Kattiawar "Agency— Bajkot— No. LXX. 165 

Article 12. 
The city of Surat and the town of Bhownuggur being under the pro- 
tection of Surat Castle, now in possession of the Honourable Company, 
by virtue of the King's royal Firman, the merchants and inhabitants of 
both places are comprehended in this Treaty; therefore, should they be treated 
with violence in their trade or persons by the Jafferabad boats or forces, the 
Honourable Company will resent it. 

Article 13. 

In case any vessels or boats shall be wrecked on the coast of Jafferabad, 
or anywhere within its jurisdiction, belonging to the English, Seedee Hillol 
faithfully promises that all assistance shall be given suitable to the occasion ; 
and should their vessels, their cargoes, sail's, stores, &c., afterwards be saved, 
every article shall be restored to the owners, without bis detaining or keeping 
the least part thereof, under any pretence whatever; and the Honourable 
Company engage to do the same by any trading vessels or boats belonging to 
Jafferabad, which may have Seedee Hindi's pass and colours, and meet with 
the like misfortune in any port or place of their jurisdiction. 

In confirmation of the foregoing Articles, the seals of the Honourable 
Company and Seedee Hillol are affixed to two papers, of the same tenor and 
date, one to remain with the Honourable the President and Council of 
Bombay, and the other with Seedee Hillol. 

Bombay, the 3rcl January 1761, or the 25th of Jamudilavul 1174. 



No. LXX. 



AsEEEMENT between the Regent Lady Nankeba on tehalf of Thakooe Jhaeeja 
Bawajee of Eajkot in Hallab (a minor), and Majob E. H. Kbatinge, V.C, 
Political Agent in KLatttwae. 

Article I. 

The Rajkot Thakoor, for the purpose of assisting government in estab- 
lisliing a civil station on its own ground at Riijkot, willingly assigns to the 
officers of the government of Bombay, in perpetuity, a spot of ground 
situated on the west or left bank of the Ajee river. 

Article 2. 
A map of the land, which measures about 385 acres, is appended. 

Article 3. 

The west half of the river-bed, where it touches the station land, is to be 
considered to belong to the latter. 

Article 4. 

Certain garden lands situated within the station limits, measuring 89,890 
square yards, to the extent of ten kos (water bags) irrigation on three wells, 



168 Kattiawar Agency— Rajkot— No. LXX. 



granted in cbarity to certain brahmins, shall be continued in the holder's 
possession in enam tenure, but the same shall be considered as included within 
the station jurisdiction. 

Aeticle 5. 

The sum of Rupees (1,500) one thousand five hundred as compensation 
for the loss sustained by the Rajkot State is to be permanently deducted 
from the tribute payable by Rajkot to the British Government. The whole 
of this plot of land is to be at the absolute disposal of the British ofiicers, no 
person having any proprietary right or right of cultivation within its bounds, 
with the exception of the garden grants referred to in the foregoing Article. 

Article 6. 

No privilege of grazing cattle, or of in any way making use of any 
Rajkot land outside the limits assigned, is to be claimed by the authorities 
or the inhabitants of the civil station. 

Aeticle 7. 

A site of not less than fifty 'yards square is to be given to the Rajkot 
Durbar in a favourable position, free from all rent or other charges, to admit 
of the construction of a house and ofBces. 

Aeticlb 8. 

It is to be understood by both parties that the establishment of this 
civil station in the vicinity of Rajkot is not in any way to affect the civil 
jurisdiction of the Rajkot State, and that the inhabitants of Rajkot, who 
may live in the civil station, or possess property in it, are not to be thereby 
entitled to assistance from the British authorities in cases in which the cause 
of action has arisen in the Rajkot territory. 

Article 9. 

In the same manner, the criminal jurisdiction of the Rajkot State is not 
in any way to be prejudiced or curtailed by the establishment of the civil 
station ; but that State is to continue to enjoy the same privileges of civil 
and criminal jurisdiction that may be continued to other tributary States of 
equal rank and position. 

Article 10. 

The authorities in the civil station are not to possess any right to forced 
labour or any privilege of making requisitions for the services of artizans. 
In time of necessity carriage must, however, be furnished according to the 
same scale that it may be demanded from the other tributary States. 

Article 11. 

The right of the Durbar to take transit duty on goods passing into or 
leaving the station to the extent sanctioned by the custom of the country 
is allowed. This duty must, however, cease if it should be generally relin- 
quished in the province. 



Kattiawar Agency— Bajkot—BTo. LXX. 167 



Article 12. 
The Durbar are not to possess the right of levying this transit duty in 
the civil station limits, but it is understood that they will be allowed to do 
so as long as their officers do not give trouble or cause inconvenience to the 
controlling authority. In the latter case the duty must be collected outside 
the station limits. 

Article 13. 

In case that government should at any time abandon the station, the 
land must be returned to the Rajkot State, and not to any other talooka ; 
and the payment of Rupees (1,500) one thousand five hundred yearly to be 
made on the part of British Government must cease. But, under such cir-^ 
cumstances, no claim is to be made on the Durbar for the value of the build- 
ings constructed upon the land. 

Article 14. 

A passage shall be left on the bank of the river along which cultiva- 
tors and cattle of the town of Rajkot shall be allowed freely to pass. 

Article 15. 

An assistant officer is to have charge of the Agency Bazar in order 
that appeal from either party may lie in the Political Agent's Court. 

Article 16. 

No person shall be enticed into the civil station, but once permanently 
residing there will cease to be subject to the Rajkot Durbar. Such residence 
will not give any claim to the protection of the agency regarding landed 
and other property within the jurisdiction of the Rajkot Durbar. 

Article 17. 

Claims regarding robberies occurring within the station limits shall be 
disposed of according to the general custom of the country. 

Article 18. 

At the special request of the Rajkot Durbar, it is agreed that no persons 
are to be allowed to fish in the Ajee river opposite the town of Rajkot, or 
for one mile up stream, or in that portion of the small stream on' the north 
of the town from the bridge to where it joins the Ajee river. 

(True copy.) 
Rajkot, 7 (Sd.) R. H. Kbatinge, 



] 



%Uh September 1863. ) Political 



168 Kattiawar Agency— Gondul— No. LXXI. 



No. LXXI. 

Agbeement entered into by the Gondul Dxtebae for the Con steuction of a Telegeaph 

Line. 

Whereas the State of Gondul is desirous of having a line of telegraph 
constructed from Rajkot to Dhorajee via Gondul, to be worked in connec- 
tion with the British lines of telegraph, the following terms are agreed upon 
by Colonel William Warden Anderson, Political Agent in Kattywar, on the 
part of the British Government, duly empowered by the Viceroy and 
Governor-General of India in Council on that behalf, and by Captain 
Augustus Marshall Phillips, Assistant Political Agent in charge Gondul, duly 
empowered by the Administration of Gondul on that behalf : — 

1. The British Government agrees to construct for the Gondul State a 
line of telegraph, consisting of one wire, to be carried on standards to be 
erected between Rajkot and Dhorajee via Gondul, at a cost of Rupees (31,200) 
thirty-one thousand and two hundred more or less, and the State of Gondul 
agrees to pay to the British Government the cost of the line as the money 
may be required. 

%. The receipts obtained by the opening of the Gondul and Dhorajee 
Telegi'aph Offices shall belong exclusively to the British Government, who 
shall defray tlie entire cost of repairing, maintaining, and working the tele- 
graph line between Rajkot and Dhorajee via Gondul ; but when the receipts 
of the Office fall short of the cost of repairs, maintenance, and working, the 
State of Gondul agrees to make good the deficiency; should there, on the 
other hand, be a surplus left after payment of all expenses, such surplus shall 
be handed over by the British Government to the State of Gondul. 

3. With the consent of the Governor-General in Council extra wires 
may at any time be added by the Telegraph Department for the Gondul State 
on terms and conditions to be agreed upon at the time between the Gondul 
State and the Government of India. 

4. The line shall be called "The Gondul-Dhorajee Branch Telegraph 
Line,'' and shall be managed and worked entirely by the officers of the British 
Telegraph Department. It shall not be dismantled without the consent of 
the British Government, but should it at any time be given up the materials 
of which it is composed shall become the property of the Gondul State. 

5. The accounts of the telegraph line shall be rendered yearly to the 
State of Gondul, and the balance shall be adjusted without delay. 

6. The State of Gondul agrees to apply to the Gondul-Dhorajee line 
the provisions of the British Telegraph Act VIII. of 1860, and such other 
Acts or legal provisions as have been^ or may hereafter be, passed by the 
British Government with reference to the telegraphs. 

7. The State of Gondul agrees to apply to the Gondul-Dhorajee Tele- 
graph Line any rules or regulations that are now, or may hereafter be, made 
applicable to lines of telegraphs in British India. The British Government 
will undertake to furnish the Gondul State with accurate translations of such 
Acts, Rules, and Regulations. 



Kattiawar Agency— Wadwan— No, IiXXII. 169 

8. The State of Gondul agrees that the Gondul-Dhorajee Telegraph 
Line shall be open to the inspection and supervision of the Director-General 
of Telegraphs and of any officer deputed by him for that purpose. 

(Sd.) W. W. Anderson, Col., 

Political Agent, 

Gondul, ") (Sd.) A. M. Phillips, Capt., 

The Wth July 1874. ) Asstt. Poltl. Agent, in charge Gondul State, 

for Thakoor Saheb Bhugwutsingjee. 



No. LXXIL 



AoEEEMENT between Raj Singjee Thaeoob of Wtjdwan, in Jhalawae, and Majoe 
E. H. Keatinge, v. c, Political Agent in Kattywae. 

The Thakoor, for the purpose of assisting Government in the adminis- 
tration of the district of Jhalawar, willingly assigns to the officers of the 
government of Bombay, in perpetuity, a spot of land situated on the north 
or left bank of the river Bhogowa, opposite the village of Ruttunpore, for 
the purpose of establishing a British station. 

The land measures about 1,760 yards, or one mile east and west, and one 
thousand yards north and south. A map of the ground is appended. 

The northern half of the river-bed, where it touches the station land, 
is to be considered to belong to the latter. 

The "sum of Rupees 2,250 (two thousand two hundred and fifty) as 
compensation for the loss sustained by the Wudwan in assigning this land, is 
to be permanently deducted from the tribute payable by Wudwan to the 
British Government. The whole of this plot of land is to be at the absolute 
disposal of the British officers, no person having any proprietary right or right 
of cultivation within its bounds. 

No privilege of grazing cattle, or of in any way making use of any 
Wudwan land outside the limits assigned, is to be claimed by the British 
authorities or the inhabitants of the station. 

A site of not less than fifty yards square is to be given to the Wudwan 
Durbar in a favourable position, free from all rent or other charges, to admit 
of the construction of a house and offices. 

It is understood by both parties that the establishment of this station 
in the vicinity of Wudwan is not in any way to affect the civil jurisdiction of 
the Wudwan State ; and that inhabitants of Wudwan, who may live in the 
station or possess property in it, are not to be thereby entitled to assistance 
from the British authorities in cases in which the cause of action has arisen 
in the Wudwan territory, 

IV 22 



170 Kattiawar Agency— Wadwan— Wo. LXXII. 



In tlie same manner the criminal jurisdiction of the Wudwan State is 
not in any way to he prejudiced or curtailed hy the establishment of the 
station ; but that State is to continue to enjoy the same privileges of civil 
and criminal jurisdiction that may be continued to other tributary States of 
equal rank and position. 

The authorities in the new station are not to possess any right of forced 
labour, or any privilege of making requisitions for the service of artizans. 
In time of necessity^ carriage must, however, be furnished according to the 
same scale that it may be'demanded from other tributary States. 

Certain custom duties are levied in the city of Wudwan, as in other 
cities under native rule, on all goods that change hands or are stored within 
the walls, but goods merely passing through in transit from one place to 
another only pay " cheela" or transit duty. 

The authorities of Wudwan having expressed a fear that in ease of mer- 
chants establishing themselves in the station, and their having no right to 
custom duty on their trade, these collections in Wudwan might be very 
injuriously affected, it has consequently been agreed — 

I. That the Wudwan Durbar is to take no Ban Zucaat or any descrip- 
tion of custom duty on grain, merchandise, cattle, forage, or fuel passing into 
the station for the use of the inhabitants. 

II. On all such articles leaving the station, the Durbar may collect a 
custom duty according to the separate statement annexed. 

III. In case the Durbar should hereafter lessen their customs duty in 
Wudwan, a proportional decrease is to take place in the rates levied on the 
departure of goods from the station, but no increase is to be made to the rates 
levied on station goods without the consent of the Political Agent or other 
chief civil authority in Kattywar. 

IV. The Durbar are not to possess the right of levying this duty in the 
station limits, but it is understood that they will be allowed to do so as long 
as their officers do not give trouble or cause inconvenience to the controlling 
authority. In the latter case the duty must be collected outside the station limits. 

V. As a portion of the land taken for the station belongs to the town 
of Doodrej, the Durbar is to pay seven per cent, of its collections under this 
agreement to the proprietors of that place. 

The right of the Durbar to take transit duty on goods passing into or 
leaving the station to the extent sanctioned by the customs of the country, is 
allowed. This duty must, however, cease if it should be generally relin- 
quished in the province. 

In ease that government should at any time abandon the station, the 
land must be returned to the Wudwan State, not to any other talooka, and 
the payment of Rupees 2,250 (two thousand two hundred and fifty) yearly 
to be made on the part of the British Government must cease, but, under 
such circumstances, no claim is to be made on the Durbar for the value of the 
buildings constructed upon the land. 



Kattiawar Agency— Wadwan— No. LXXIII. 



171 



At the special request of the Thakoor, it is agreed that no persons are to 
be allowed to fish in the Bhogowa river opposite the city of Wudwan, or for 
one mile east or west from its walls. 

(Sd.) R. H. Kbatingb, 

Political Agent, 

Statement showing the amount of Import and Export Duties fixed to he levied 

in the Wudwan Talooka. 









gts 


•ag 
















IB 








No. 


Names of Articles, 


Per. 




If 




B E U A B E 9. 










§§■»§ 


§BS 












isg.g 


1-92 












<t 


< 








1 


Grain 

Tnll or oil seed 


1 Kulsee 


18 


1 14 









2 


Toor, Daul and Rice 


^ 














Sngarcandy, Sugar, soft, Betelnuts. Tobacco/ 
Jaggery, dry Dates, wet Dates, Dhuna, Com- 


>Maund 


2 


2 


6 








min. Chillies, Iron, Moura, &c. 


^ 












3 


Cottonseeds ... .;. 


Six maunds... 


2 


2 


6 






4 


Ghee 

Cussoomba, Soortmgee, Wax, &e. ... 


1 Maund 


3 


3 


9 






S 


Oil ... 

Khankun, Alum, Putung, and Pudwaa 


] Ditto 


2 6 


3 









6 


Cocoanuts 


Hundred ... 


3 


3 









7 


Copper, Brass, Jussut, or Pewter, -Tin, Kansa, 


■ 














Lead, and Vessels made of 


\ Maund 


4 


S 











Cotton 


) 












8 


Cardamums, Cloves, Zavuntree, Nutmegs, Cin- 


•) 














namon, &c., Asafceteda, and Kessnr 


f- Ditto 


18 


1 14 











Silk 


J 












9 


iTory 


Ditto 


12 


15 









10 


Cotton Pods, with cotton in 


20 maunds ... 


1 3 


1 4 









11 


Carte conveying material for houses, DhoUios 
or cots, &c. ... 


j Each cart ... 


8 


8 









12 


Carts conveying mangoes 


Ditto 


14 


1 4 





and 5 maund of man- 


13 


Plantains and sugar-canes 


Ditto 


4 


4 





goes, 
and 50 plantains 


and 


14 


Cotton thread ... 


Maund 


6 


7 


6 


15 sugar-canes. 




19 


Silk cloth 


Piece 


2 


2 









16 


Country Cotton cloth, coloured and uuooloured, 
and also Hides 


1 Ditto 


3 





3' 


' 




17 


Europe Cloth, Mudapolums, &c. 

The maund is to be counted at 40 seers of 40 

tolas each for all goods. 
A kulsee is to be counted thirty maunds. 


Ditto 


9 





9 







R A J K O T, 

Ith January 1864. 



(Sd.) 



R. H. Keatingb, 
Political Agent, 



No. LXXIII. 

Engagement passed by Majoe K. H, Keatingb, v,c,, Political Agent in Kattywab, 
to KuESUNSUNG, GroviNDS0NG, and Umeeestjng, Bhoomias of the Village of 
DooDEEj in Jhalawab, 

The officers of government requiring a small piece of land, measuring 
about twenty-five acres, on the' borders of your village, for the purpose of 



172 Kattiawar Agency— Mallia— No. LXXIV. 



establishing a station, it is agreed that you are to receive as compensation for 
it a remission of your tribute to the amouiit of Rupees (250) two hundred 
and lifty yearly. 

The whole of the plot of land is to be at the absolute disposal of the 
British officersj no person having any proprietary right or right of cultivation 
within its bounds. 

No privilege of grazing cattle, or in any way making use of any land 
under Doodrej, beyond the plot now treated of, is to be claimed by the British 
authorities under this engagement. 

A site of not less than twenty-five yards square is to be g^ven to the pro- 
prietors of Doodrej in a favourable position, free from all rent or other charges 
to admit of the construction of a house and offices. 

The Bhoomias of Doodrej are, whilst they conduct themselves with pro- 
priety, to enjoy the same privileges in all matters connected with the adminis- 
tration of justice that is accorded to other persons of the same rank and 
position. 

The authorities in the new station are not to possess any right of forced 
labour, or any privilege of making requisitions for the service of artizans. 
In time of necessity carriage must, however, be furnished according to the 
same scale that it may be demanded from other tributary States. 

The proprietors of Doodrej are not to possess any right of levying Dan 
Zucaat or any other custom duty on food, merchandise, cattle, forage, or fuel 
entering or leaving the station, but they may claim to receive from the 
!Wudwan State seven per cent, of the collections which may be made by that 
Durbar, under the terms of an agreement concluded with them under this 
date. 

^ The right of the Bhoomias to take transit duty on goods passing into or 
leaving the station to the extent sanctioned by the customs of the country, is 
allowed. This duty must, however, cease if it should be generally relinquished 
in the province. 

In case that government should at any time abandon the station, this 
land must be returned to the Bhoomias of Doodrej, not to any other persons; 
and the payment of Rupees (250) two hundred and fifty yearly to be made on 
the part of the British Government must cease ; but, under such circumstances, 
no claim is to be made on the Bhoomias of Doodrej for the value of the 
buildings constructed upon the land. 

Rajkot, ■) (Sd.) R. H. Keatxnge, 

1th January 1864. / Political Agent. 



No. LXXIV. 

Ageeement entered into by the Thakooe of Maelia. 
I, Jadeja Suttaji, talookdar of Mallia, do hereby enter into agreement with 
Major Keatiuge, Political Agent of Kattywar, that during the interviews of 



Kattiawar Agency— Mallia— No. LXXIV. 173 



the 18th and 20th December you informed me that you were dissatisfied with 
the working of the Mallia thana, and that you intended to make an 
effective arrangement for its better working. Whereupon I requested you 
that I should once more be entrusted with the affairs of the Meenas and the 
management of the thana ; and I now bind myself that should my request 
be granted I will adopt the following arrangement and act accordingly : — 

I. I will keep the Meenas under control and will also put a stop, as far 
as* possible, to their habits of thieving, house-breaking, &c. Should they, 
however, commit mischief to any person or talooka, I will amicably satisfy 
the injured parties in accordance with the practice in force for the time being 
sanctioned by the Political Agent. 

II. I will cause a thana-building to be erected at MaIHa on the plan 
prescribed by the Political Agent for similar buildings in other parts of Katty- 
war. The same shall be substantially built at once, and for this purpose I will 
place Rupees 5,000 in deposit with the Agent's treasury or with any Banker 
named by him ; and on commencement of the work the sums that may be 
required from time to time should be paid to me by Government. The build- 
ing will be constructed on the said plan and the account of the cost thereof 
will be shown if required. Any sum that may remain unexpended on com- 
pletion of the building should be refunded to me. 

III. I will employ and permanently keep up the following establishment 
for the thana, and their salaries shall always be paid to them as detailed 
below. I will employ educated and respectable persons as thandar and his 
karkoon : — 







Rs. 


a. 


P- 


Pay of Thandar 


. . . 


60 








„ of Mehta 




30 








„ of Duffedar ... 


... 


15 








„ of 12 Seebundee palas (footmen). 


at 








Rupees 7 each... 


... 


84, 








Contingencies 


ees... 


11 








Rup 


200 









Besides the above I will station 15 chosen sowars in Mallia. The account 
of the disbursement of the salaries of the thana establishment will be shown 
to an officer of the Agency whenever he may ask for it, and I shall see 
that the men of the thana are always present on duty. 

IV. I agree that either myself or Koovur Modji will always be present 
in MalHa, and whichever of us will stay there will conduct business with the 
Agency. If I station Koovur Modji there for the carrying out of this 
arrangement, he will be invested with full powers in connection with the 
affairs of the Meenas, so that he may not have to wait for any instructions 
from me ; and after it is once settled which of us is to stay there he shall 
not be removed without the consent of an officer of the Agency. 



174 Kattiawar Agency— Mallia- Wo. LXXIV. 

V. The affairs in connection with the tribe of the Meenas are at present 
in the jurisdiction of the Agency. It being now proposed to entrust the 
same to my house, I agree that I will administer the same in accordance with 
the terms aforesaid. In case of my failure J agree that the Political Agency 
has a right to resume the said authority, and further that the criminal juris- 
diction over all our villages inhabited by Meenas shall also be vested as a 
matter of right in the Agency. 

VI. ^ For the above reasons the Political Agent has personally advised 

me that it would be detrimental to my interest if I were to allow the Meenas 

. „. . . to spread over the new villages beyond those into* which 

• Sic m ona. .1 1 ■ • ° ■' 

" they are now living. 

Dated 2lst December 1863. 

Signed by Jareja Sdttajee. 

What is written above is true. Date as above. 

Signature acknowledged before me this day at Mallia. 

Mall I A, ) (Sd.) K. H. Keatinge, 

The Z\si December 1863. I Political Agent. 

(True translation.) 

(Sd.) Krishnajee Ltjxmun, 

Actff. Asst. Poltl. Agent. 



BARODA AGENCY. 

Ke Gaehtoar. — One o£ the most distinguished among the first Mah- 
ratta leaders was Khundee Rao Dhabaray, who subsisted his followers in 
Guzerat and Kattiawar from which provinces he exacted tribute. In the 
struggle for the supremacy in the Mahratta confederacyj he supported the 
cause of Sahojee by whom he was raised to the rank of Senaputtee or Com- 
mander-in-Chief. One of his officers, Damajee Gaekwar, who stood high in 
his estimation, was on his recommendation appointed second in command. 
Khundee Rao and Damajee Gaekwar died within a few months of each other 
in 1721 and were succeeded in office, the former by his son Trimbuk Rao 
Dhabaray, and the latter by his nephew, Peelajee Gaekwar. 

In 1729 the Peishwa Bajee Rao obtained from Sirbulund Khan, the 
Mogul Deputy in Guzerat, a cession of the chouth and other dues of that 
province, and, among other conditions of the grant, engaged to prevent 
Mahratta subjects from taking part with disturbers of the peace. This condi- 
tion was chiefly aimed at Trimbuk Rao Dhabaray and Peelajee Gaekwar, by 
whom it was considered to be an invasion of their rights. Trimbuk Rao 
therefore entered into negotiations with other Mahratta leaders in Guzerat 
to oppose the Peishwa^s claims. But he was defeated and slain in battle in 
1731, and the Peishwa's rights in Guzerat were thus established. Jeswunt 
Rao, the infant son of Trimbuk Rao, was appointed to the rank of Senaputtee, 
and Peelajee Gaekwar was confirmed in his former post with the title of Sena 
Khas Kheyl. It was agreed that the Peishwa and Senaputtee should not 
interfere with each other's possessions, and that Jeswunt Rao should have the 
entire management in Guzerat, paying half the revenue to the Peishwa, and 
accounting for all contributions levied from countries not mentioned in the 
deeds of cession given by Sirbulund Khan to the Peishwa. The cession of 
the chouth by Sirbulund Khan, however, was disallowed by the Emperor of 
Delhi. Sirbulund Khan was remote from office, and was superseded by Abhee 
Sing, Rajah of Jodhpore, by one of whose emissaries Peelajee Gaekwar was 
murdered. 

Damajee Gaekwar, son of Peelajee, avenged his father's murder, and suc- 
ceeded in wresting the whole of Guzerat from the Moguls. Jeswunt Rao, 
when he came of age, proved quite incompetent for his post, and the Dha- 
baray family gave place to the Gaekwars. Damajee Gaekwar supported Tara 



176 Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar. 

Bai in an effort which she made to free her gi'andson, the Rajah of Satara, 
from the thraldom of the Peishwa Ballajee Bajee Rao, but he was treacherously 
seized by the Peishwa, and was not released till he agreed* to pay to the 
Peishwa 15 lakhs of rupees as arrears of tribute from Guzerat, and to share 
equally all his possessions and future conquests. In the following year the 
Peishwa obtained a partitionf of Damajee Gaekwar^'s conquests in Kattiawar, 
and the Gaekwar agreed to assist the Peishwa with troops when necessary; 
Thereafter the armies of Damajee Gaekwar and of the Peishwa under Ragoba 
proceeded to the joint conquest of Guzerat. In 1755 the Mogul Government 
in Ahmedabad was entirely subverted, and the town and country were shared 
between the Peishwa and the Gaekwar. Damajee Gaekwar was a supporter 
of Ragoba in his rebellion against Madho Rao, and furnished him with troops 
under his son, Govind Rao. But in this war he was defeated, and punished by 
the imposition of an annual tribute of Rupees 6,25,000, and annual service 
with 3,000 horse during peace and 4,000 during war. He also agreed to pay 
Rupees 2,54,000 for certain districts which the Peishwa promised to restore 
to him, making his tribute in all Rupees 7,79,000. He left four sons, Syajee, 
his eldest son by his second wife, Govind Rao, his second son by his first wife 
and Manajee and Futteh Sing by his third wife. Govind Rao was at Poona 
at the time of his father's death, and by the payment of a large nuzzer to the 
Peishwa Madho Rao, and agreeingj to the arrangements which had been con- 
cluded with Damajee three years before he procured his recognition as successor 
to his father's rank of Sena Khas Khel. But Futteh Sing urged the superior 
claim of Syajee, the eldest son, who was an idiot j and the Peishwa, whose 
object was to divide the family and thereby reduce the Gaekwar's power, sub- 
sequently admitted§ Syajee's right, by which the brothers Govind Rao and 
Futteh Sing were made implacable enemies. To strengthen his position Futteh 
Sing made overtures for an alliance with the British Government in 1772, 
but his proposal was rejected. In January 1773, however, an Agreement 
(No. LXXV.) was made with him, by which the Gaekwar's share of the 
revenues of Broach, which, in consequence of a quarrel with the Nawab of 
Broach the British Government had taken by assault on 18th November 
1772, was to remain on the same footing as under the government of the Nawab. 

After the murder of Narain Rao, the Peishwa Ragoba again recognized 
the claim of Govind Rao. Therefore, when Ragoba fled to Guzerat before 



* Appendix No. III. J Appendix No. V. 

t Appendix No. IV. § Appendix No. VI. 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar. 177 



tlie army of the ministerial party at Poona, who supported the claim of Madho 
Rao Narain, the posthumous son of Narain Eao^ to the position of Peishwaj 
he found an ally in Govind Rao, and an enemy in Futteh Sing. When the 
Bombay force joined the army of Ragoba, an unsuccessful attempt was made 
to detach Futteh Sing from the cause of the ministerial party. But after 
some successes had been gained by the British troops in Guzerat, a Treaty 
(No. LXXVI.) was mediated between Futteh Sing and Ragoba, by which it 
was agreed that he should furnish troops and money to Ragoba, who was to 
provide Govind Rao with a jaghire in the Deccan, and that the British Govern- 
ment as guarantees of the Treaty should receive the Gaekwar's share of 
the revenues of Broach and several villages in perpetuity. This Treaty was 
abrogated by the orders of the Bengal Government, which dissolved the 
connection with Ragoba, and led to the conclusion of the Treaty* of Poorun- 
dur, formed by Colonel Upton with the ministerial party at Poona, one of 
the provisions of which was that the cessions made by Futteh Sing should be 
restored to him if it could be proved that he had no authority to make them 
without the previous' consent of the Peishwa's government. The object of 
this on the part of the ministerial party was to induce Futteh Sing to acknow- 
ledge his dependence on the Poona court, by whom in February 1778, he was 
recognizedf as Sena Khas Khel on his paying up his arrears of tribute. 

After the convention of Wargaon, it was proposed to reduce the Mahratta 
power by concluding a Treaty with the Gaekwar family, acknowledging 
their independence of the Peishwa, and by conquering for the British 
Government the Peishwa's share in Guzerat. General Goddard having 
effected some successes in the campaign in Guzerat, concluded a Treaty of 
offensive and defensive alliance (No. LXXVII.) on these principles with 
Futteh Sing on 36th January 1780. Futteh Sing was to receive the Peishwa^s 
territory north of the Mahee river, to cede his districts south of the Taptee, 
the revenues of Broach and villages adjacent and the district of Sinnore on 
the Nerbudda to be relieved from payment of tribute to the Peishwa during 
the war, and to send 3,000 horse to join the British army. The terms of this 
Treaty were generally approved by the Supreme Government; but some 
objections were taken to the wording of it. The seal of Government and 
the signatures of the Members of Council were therefore aflBxed by way of 
ratification to an amended version, copies of which were sent to the Bombay 

* See Volume V., page 28. t Appendix No. VII. 

IV 23 



X78 Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar. 



Government to be exchanged with Futteh Sing. The alterations made, 
however, were never communicated to him. The question whether, under these 
circumstances, either of the versions o£ the Treaty was a binding document 
is of no practical importance, for by the Treaty of Salbye,* which established 
peace between the British Government and the Peishwa in 1782, the territories 
of the Gaekwar were placed on the footing on which they stood before the 
war, and Futteh Sing was required to pay tribute to the Peishwa as formerly, 
but was exempted from all retrospectivef claims. 

Futteh Sing Gaekwar died on 31st December 1789. His brother, 
Manajee, immediately assumed charge of the Government for his brother, 
Syajee, and was recognized by the Peishwa on payment of a large nuzzer. 
The claims of Govind Kao, however, were supported by Madhojee Scindia. 
To strengthen his power, Manajee applied for the protection of the British 
Government under the Treaty of 1780, but interference was declined, on the 
ground that the Treaty had been superseded by the Treaty of Salbye. The 
family quarrel was terminated by the death of Manajee on 1st August 1793, 
and the succession of Govind Rao, who was required to pay large surasj to 
the Peishwa, and to sign an agreement ceding to the Peishwa the Gaekwar's 
districts south of the Taptee and his share of the customs of Surat. But this 
cession was afterwards relinquished by the Peishwa, the British Government 
having objected to it as a dismemberment of the Gaekwar's territory, contrary 
to the provisions of the Treaty of Salbye, 

Aba Shelookur, the Peishwa's Deputy in Guzerat, excited the enmity of 
Govind Rao by levying contributions in the Gaekwar's villages. This led to 
hostilities, to which the Gaekwar was further incited by Bajee Rao, as 
Aba Shelookur was one of the supporters of the minister. Nana Furnavees. 
The quarrel was materially affected by the intervention of the British Govern- 
ment. On the death of the Nawab of Surat in 1799, the British Govern- 
ment endeavoured to obtain the cession of the Gaekwar's share of the chouth 
of Surat and the surrounding districts. To this the Gaekwar consented, on 
condition of the Peishwa's sanction being obtained, and in the hope of securing 
assistance against Aba Shelookur. The request for aid was evaded, but in the 
meantime Aba Shelookur was made prisoner by Govindo Rao, and in October 
1800, the Peishwa leased to the Gaekwar his share in the Guzerat revenues for 
five years at the rate of five lakhs a year annually. 

* See Volume V„ page 41, t Appendix No. VIII. J Appendix No. IX. 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar. 179 



In September of that year Govind Rao died, aud his eldest son, Anund 
Rao, was acknowledged as his successor. He was of weak intellect, and the 
powers of the State were usurped by his illegitimate half-brother, Canojee 
Rao. The usurper, however, was deposed by a party headed by Raojee Appa- 
jee, the minister of Govind B-m, supported by Babajee, his brother. But the 
cause of Canojee was espoused by Mulhar Rao, the cousin of Go^nd Rao, 
whose father had been a supporter of Govind Rao in his struggles with 
Futteh Sing^ and who was dissatisfied with the treatment he had received 
from Govind Rao after the accession of the latter to power. The struggle 
was ended by Raojee Appajee throwing himself on the protection of the 
British Government, and agreeing, on ISth March 1802 (No. LXXVIII.) to 
receive a subsidiary force from the Bombay Government, and to cede the chouth 
of Surat and the pergunnah of Chowrassee, on condition of being supported 
against Mulhar Rao. After a short campaign Mulhar Rao surrendered and 
received for his support Rupees 1,25,000 a year. Both Mulhar Rao and Canojee 
subsequently more than on^e rebelled, and the latter was eventually removed 
to Madras in 1812, in consequence of his conspiring with the Jam of Nowa- 
nuggur to secure his own elevation to the Baroda State and to destroy the 
British ascendancy in Guzerat. The former died a prisoner at Bombay. 

The convention of 15.th March 1802 was reduced to a formal Treaty 
(No. LXXIX.) confirmed by the Gaekwar in a separate written agreement on 
29th July 1802. To this Treaty a private engagement with Raojee Appajee 
was added, guaranteeing to him permanently the post of minister and extend- 
ing the protection of the British Government to him, his son, brothers, nephews, 
relations, and friends. By the 14th Article of the Treaty of Bassein,* the 
Treaty with the Gaekwar was recognized and acknowledged by the Peishwa. 

The convention of 15th March 1802 contained a stipulation, which was 
confiitned by the subsequent engagements, that the British Government 
shouljl assist the Gaekwar in reducing his Arab mercenaries.f These troops 

* See Volume V., page 56. 

t The engagements of 1802 gave the British Government an almost unlimited power of 
interference in the internal government of the Baroda State. When these engagements were 
concluded, there was really no government iu Baroda. The power of Anund Rao was defied by 
Canojee and Mulhar Rao, while his person was seized by the Arab troops, who, although few in 
number, occupied all the important military posts, and with whom intrigues were kept up for the 
establishment of Canojee in power. Negotiations were opened with these mercenaries, who were 
offered full arrears of pay and liberal treatment on condition of their removing from Guzerat. 
They refused ; and in consequence the town of Baroda, which was occupied by them, was invested 
by a British force. The Arabs at last capitulated and agreed to withdraw on condition of 



180 Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar. 



had become all powerful in the Gaekwar's territories and even kept the 
Gaekwar in arrest. They cost the State about Eupees 3^00,000 a year, but 
the Gaekwar was powerless to discharge them, as he owed them arrears of 
pay amounting to about Rupees 20,00,000, and the current revenues of the 
year were mortgaged. The money was advanced to the Gaekwar by the 
British Government on territorial security. The reduction of the mercenary 
troops was effected not without bloodshed, after which the Gaekwar ceded (No. 
LXXX.) districts yielding Rupees 7,80,000 for the support of the subsidiary 
force. The above engagements were all consolidated in the definitive Treaty 
of 21st April 1805 (No. LXXXI.), by which also the subsidiary force was 
increased, territories yielding Rupees 11,70,000 were ceded for its support, 
lauds yielding Rupees 12,95,000 were assigned for the payment of the Gaek- 
war's debts to the British Government, amounting to Rupees 41,38,732; the 
Gaekwar bound himself to submit his pecuniary disputes with the Peishwa to 
the arbitration of the Bri^sh Government, and generally his relations with 
the British Government were defined. The ceded districts were found not to 
yield a revenue equal to the cost of the subsidiary force, and therefore, on 18th 
June 1807, the Gaekwar ceded (No. LXXXTI.) additional territories yielding 
Rupees 1,76,168. In 1812 a proposal was raised by the Bombay Government 
to restore to the Gaekwar,.in consideration of a payment of upwards of a erore 
of Rupees, the territories ceded for the subsidy, and to farm to him the districts 
acquired under the Treaty of Bassein, the engagements regarding the subsi- 

receiving the arrears due to them, and of the Bhandery or guarantee of the British Government 
teing substituted for that of the Arabs wherever it liad been granted either to persons or property. 
In Guzerat, at that time, no Important engagement of any kind was ever made without a 
guarantee or security, and the Jemadars of the Arabs had in many cases not only become security 
to bankers for the repayment of loaus made by them to the Gaekwar, but had guaranteed their 
persons from molestation and oppression. To some extent the guarantee system was a power 
vested by the ruler in his subjects, enabling them to control him in the event of his deviating 
from his engagements. When the Arabs were discharged, tliey were released from these engage- 
ments, to which the seal of the British Government was attached as a guarantee. The British 
Government also committed themselves to other guarantees for loans advanced to enable the 
Gaekwar to discharge the Arabs and for other purposes, and to pledges to ministers and other 
officials, who really exercised the civil power, and who stipulated for protection to themselves and 
their descendants before they would commit themselves to the policy of the British Government. 

These guarantees were considered at the time they were granted to be of much advantage in 
securing British influence at Baroda, at the same time that they established the Gaekwar's credit ; 
and so long as the British Government continued to exercise a close control over the affairs of the 
Gaekwar, no inconvenience was felt from them. But after 1820, when the Gaekwar was vested 
with the full government of his State, the guarantees proved a source of much irritation. A 
particular account of them here would be out of place. Pull information on the subject will be 
found in the Parliamentary Blue Book of 5th August 1863. Of late years it has boon the policy 
of the British Government to withdraw from the guarantees, so far as it can do so with good 
faith. With exception of four guarantees, which have been declared to bo perpetual, all have 
cither lapsed, or been forfeited by misconduct, or declared to hold good only for the lives of the 
parties. 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar. 181 

diary force remaining otherwise intact. The proposal, as was to be expeetedj 
did not meet with the sanction of Government. 

The Peishwa's claims against the Gaekwar for the tribute of Kattiawar 
and the farm of Ahmedabad,- which, after the expiry of the five years' lease, 
had in 1804 been renewed* for ten years, at the rate of Rupees 4,50,000 
a year, through the mediation and under the guarantee of the British Govern- 
ment were met by counter-claims on the part of the Gaekwar for the 
revenues of Broach, whicb the Peishwa had, without his consent, ceded to 
the British, and for the pay of extraordinary troops kept up for the defence 
of the Peishwa's possessions in Guzerat. Renewal of the lease, which expired 
in 1814, was refused, and Trimbukjee Anglia, the favourite creature of Bajee 
Rao, directed the Kattiawar Chiefs not to pay to the Gaekwar the Peishwa's 
share of the tribute. To adjust these disputes, Gungadhur Shastree, the 
Gaekwar's minister, was deputed to Poena under the guarantee of the British 
Government for his safety, where he was basely assassinated by Trimbukjee 
Anglia. By the Treatyf which, in consequence of this outrage, the Peishwa 
was required to subscribe on 13th June 1817, the Peishwa was obliged to 
renounce all future claims against the Gaekwar, and to compromise past 
claims for an annual sum of four lakhs of rupees, a payment from which 
the Gaekwar was released on the overthrow of the Peishwa. As the result 
of this arrangement, a new Treaty (No. LXXXIII.) was concluded on 6th 
November 1817 with Putteh Sing, the Regent, on behalf of Anuud Rao 
Gaekwar. The chief provisions of this Treaty were an increase of the subsi- 
diary force; the cession to the BritisTi Government of all the rights the 
Gaekwar had acquired by the farm of the Peishwa's territories in Guzerat ; 
the consolidation of the territories of the British Government and the Gaekwar 
in Guzerat by exchange of certain districts ; the co-operation of the Gaekwar's 
troops with those of the British Government in time of war ; and the mutual 
surrender of criminals. 

Anund Rao Gaekwar died on 2nd October 1819, and was succeeded by his 
brother, Syajee Rao, who, during the two preceding years, had been Regent 
to the exclusion of his two legitimate sons, Bulwunt Rao and Peelajee Rao, 
by a Rajpoot wife. On his accession Government resolved (No. LXXXIV.) 
to withdraw from the minute interference which it had hitherto exercised 
in the affairs of the Baroda State, on condition of the Gaekwar respecting 

* Appendix No. X. t Vol. V., page 64. 



182 Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar. 

the guaranteed allowances of his ministers, the agreements with his tribu- 
taries, and his bargains with his bankers. One of the conditions on which 
the Arab mercenaries had taken their discharge in 1803 was that the guarantee 
of the British Government should be substituted for the guarantees which 
had been given by the Arabs to several Baroda bankers, promising them 
security from molestation and the payment of loans advanced by them to 
the State. Besides these. Government guaranteed the payment of several 
other loans, which had been raised at different times to relieve the Gaekwar's 
embarrassments. In 1820 the whole debts of the State amounted to Rupees 
1,07,66,297. Loans for the liquidation of this sum were raised from six principal 
bankers under British guarantee, the Gaekwar engaging to pay them off at 
the rate of fifteen lakhs per annum. The instalments were very irregularly 
paid, and in 1825 it was found that the debts had increased. With the 
consent of the Gaekwar a new arrangement was made under guarantee, by 
which certain districts were farmed for seven years to pay off the debt. 
Syajee Rao, however, violated the leases and showed no disposition to respect 
the guarantees, and therefore government, in 1828, temporarily attached the 
districts of Pitlaud, Byal, Kuree, Dubhoy, Bhadurpore, Sinnore, Amrolee 
Damnuggur, and Seanuggur, and the tributes of Kattiawar, Mahee Kanta, 
Rewa Kanta, Rajpeepla, Oodeypore, and the tributary Sunkheira villages. 
In 1832, however, after much negotiation, a private settlement was effected 
between the Gaekwar and the bankers, the guarantees were cancelled, and the 
districts and tributes were restored to the Gaekwar. 

In 1820 Syajee Rao entered into a Convention (No. LXXXV.) regulating 
the sale of opium in his territories, the export of which had been previously 
prohibited, except on payment of a duty of Rupees 12 a seer. In the same 
years another . Convention (No. LXXXVI.) was concluded, whereby the 
Gaekwar agreed to send no troops into Kattiawar and Mahee Kanta without 
the consent of the British Government, and to make no demand on his tribu- 
taries, except through the medium of the British Government, who engaged 
to procure payment of the tribute free of expense to the Gaekwar. In 1825 
the Gaekwar agreed (No. LXXXVII.) that his share of any fines levied in 
Kattiawar, or of any extra revenue over and above the revenue fixed at the 
perpetual settlement, should be credited to the infanticide fund.* In 1841! 
the Rules (No. LXXXVIII.) regulating the levy of dues on vessels driven 

* See Kattiawar. 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar, 183 

into his ports in Kattiawar by stress of weather were issued. Revised rules 
(No. LXXXIX.) were issued in 1850. 

By the 8th Article of the Treaty of 1817 the Gaekwar was bound to 
maintain a body of 3,000 efEective cavalry to co-operate with the subsidiary 
force. This Article gave the British Government no right to the services of 
this force except when the subsidiary force could be employed; but the 
practice grew up of holding it available at all times for police duty in the 
tributary States. The force was very inefficient, and in 1830 the Gaekwar 
was called on to render two-thirds of the cavalry fit for service. On his 
failing to do so, lands yielding about Rupees 15,00,000 were sequestrated to 
provide funds for their punctual payment. In 1832, however, the districts 
were restored on the Gaekwar agreeing (No. XC.) to deposit Rupees 
10,00,000 with the British Government. In the following years the Gaekwar 
committed himself to a long course of unfriendly acts against the British 
Government, endangering the alliance and leading in 1839 to the sequestra- 
tion of the district of Pitlaud, yielding a revenue of Rupees 7,32,000, and 
the threatened deposition of Syajee Rao Gaekwar and the transfer of the 
sovereignty to another member of the family. Part of the revenue of 
Pitlaud was appropriated to the maintenance of a body of cavalry organized 
by the British Government and called the Guzerat Irregular Horse. In 1840 
it was proposed to the Gaekwar to reform his contingent by reducing the 
ptrength to 1,500 efficient men. This proposal was not based on the Treaty 
of 1817, which was declared abrogated by the unfriendly conduct of the 
Gaekwar. The Gaekwar, whose conduct for many years had been most 
unfriendly, was much opposed to this measure, but at last in 1841, when the 
causes of dispute between the two governments were adjusted, an Agreement 
(No. XCI.) was made with him, which revived the Treaty of 1817, 
. provided for a payment of Rupees 3,00,000 for the Guzerat Irregular Horse, 
the maintenance of the contingent of 3,000 horse by the Gaekwar, and its 
employment in the tributary districts, with permission to the Gaekwar to reduce 
at any time the number so employed to 1,500 men. On the conclusion of 
this agreement the district of Pitlaud was restored, and the Rupees 10,00,000 
deposited with the British Government in 1833 were refunded to the 
Gaekwar. In 1 858, as a reward for the services of the Gaekwar during the 
mutinies, the payment of Rupees 3,00,000 a year for the Guzerat Irregular 
Horse was remitted (No. XCII.), but at the same time the permis- 
sion given to the Gaekwar to reduce the contingent to 1,500 men was 



184 Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar- 

cancelled, and the contingent was put on the same footing as that described 
in the 8th Article of the Treaty of 1817, with the additional provision that it 
should do ordinary police duty in the tributary districts. 

In 1856 the Gaekwar ceded in sovereignty (No. XCIII.) the lands 
required for the construction of the Bombay and Baroda railway, on condition 
that he should not suffer by the loss of transit duties. In the same year the 
Resident submitted three conventions, to any of which the Gaekwar was ready 
to agree. By the first, the Gaekwar proposed to abolish all customs and 
transit duties within his dominions for an annual compensation of Rupees 
3,61,417; by the second he proposed to abolish all customs and transit 
duties in the districts traversed by the railway for an annual compensation of 
Rupees 1,54,770; and by the third he proposed to levy certain duties on the 
trafiic of the railway passing through his territories agreeably to the existing 
traffic. None of these proposals were agreed to, but it was decided to com- 
pensate the Gaekwar year by year for any proved loss caused by the opening 
of the railway. The Resident at Baroda has magisterial powers for the trial 
of cases arising in that portion of the railway which passes through the 
Gaekwar's territories. 

For many years a controversy existed as to the respective rights of the 
British Government and of the Gaekwar to 46 villages in the Wajpore Turuf, 
a tract of land in Khandeish. These villages were in the possession of the 
Peishwa from 1750 to the downfall of the Mahratta power in 1817. During 
the earlier years of British rule the claim of the British Government as 
successor to the Peishwa was preserved, but the Gaekwar who held 
some villages in this district in rightful possession gradually encroached 
on the British villages, which had for some years yielded no revenue, 
and when in 1848 the question attracted attention and a claim was put for- 
ward by the British Government, the Gaekwar had been in undisturbed 
possession of the villages for twenty-one years. The question remained in 
abeyance until 1869 when in consideration of the long possession of the 
Gaekwar the British Government waived its claim. 

On 19th December 1847 Syajee Rao Gaekwar died, and was succeeded 
by his eldest son, Gunput Rao, who, dying without male issue on 19th 
November 1856, was succeeded, on 12th December, by his brother, Khundee 
Rao, who, in 1862, received the right of adoption (No. XCIV.). 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar. 185 

Khundee Eao Gackwai'j who was a Knight Grand Commander of the Most 
Exalted Order of the Star of India, died in November ] 870 without male 
issue, though the accouchment of his younger wife was expected. The heii' 
apparent under these circumstances was his younger brother, Mulhar Rao, 
who had been accused in 1863 of being concerned in a conspiracy to compass 
the death of his brother, and was in consequence confined as a State prisoner 
at Padra in Baroda territory. Mulhar Rao, having acknowledged in writing 
that if a posthumous son were born such son woald be the undoubted heir to the 
guddee, was recognized as Regent during the interregnum and eventually as 
Gaekwar on the birth of Khundee Rao's posthumous daughter. The last 
six years of Khundee Rao's rule had been marked by a serious deterioration in 
the system and measures of his Government, which attracted on several occa- 
sions the severe animadversion of Government. Under Mulhar Rao's rule 
the disorganization increased. 

In 1873 the maladministration of the Baroda State necessitated the 
active interference of the British Government. A Commission was appointed 
for the purpose of making the necessary enquiries. The report of the Com- 
mission in March 1874 established so serious an amount of general mis- 
government in Baroda that the Gaekwar was warned that unless within a 
given time he effected the necessary reforms, the nature and extent of which 
were fully explained to him, he would be removed from the exercise of power 
and such other arrangements consistent with the maintenance of the integrity 
of the Baroda State would be made as might be deemed necessary to secure 
a satisfactory administration. 

In May 1874 Mulhar Rao solemnized his marriage with his mistress, 
Luxmeebaee. In consequence of doubts as to the propriety of this marriage, 
the Resident was directed not to attend the ceremony. By the tone of his 
communications to the Resident on this subject, the Gaekwar exposed him- 
self to the grave displeasure of Government. Five months after the marriage 
a son was born, but the Resident did not participate in the ceremonies usually 
performed at the birth of a legal heir, and the course of events subsequently 
made it unnecessary for the Government of India to pronounce upon the 
legitimacy of the marriage. Added to these causes of dissatisfaction with the 
conduct of the Gaekwar was his treatment of his brother's youngest widow 
whom he confined to the palace till her life was endangered, and did not 
release till informed that he would beheld responsible if she suffered any further 

2* 



186 Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar, 

injury. In the meantime the Gaekwar's marriage with Luxmeebaee had aggra- 
vated the serious differences between him and his nobles which had been 
commented on in report of the Commission: the pay of the military classes 
was greatly in arrear; the Sindies and Arabs in his service were fast getting 
beyond control, and there seemed to be every prospect of a rebellion. In 
short no substantial progress had been made in reforming the adminis- 
tration notwithstanding the Gaekwar's promises to that effect. 

In November 1874 a special officer was directed to replace the Resi- 
dent at Baroda, whose personal relations with the Gaekwar were not altogether 
satisfactory, and to afford the Gaekwar every possible aid in reforming his 
administration. The Resident, Colonel Phayre, had reported an attempt to 
poison him, and his successor. Sir Lewis Felly, was instructed to investigate the 
case. Evidence was brought to light which tended not only to substantiate the 
commission of the attempt, but to throw suspicion on the Gaekwar. An 
enquiry was deemed essential, but having regard to the antecedents of the 
Gaekwar and the discredit thrown on his character by the report of the Com- 
mission, and to the weight of the evidence now brought to light, Govern- 
ment was of opinion that the enquiry would be conducted under disadvantages 
if Mulhar Rao remained in the position of Gaekwar, and that it would be 
improper to continue friendly communications with him pending the investi- 
gations. It was therefore determined to suspend Mulhar Rao from power, and 
to assume on behalf of the British Government the administration of the 
State pending the result of the enquiry. Troops were accordingly sent to 
Baroda, Mulhar Rao was arrested, and a Proclamation (No. XCV.) was 
issued announcing his suspension and the institution of the enquiry : it was 
added that whatever the results of the enquiry might be a native administra- 
tion would be re-established at Baroda. The charges against Mulhar Rao of 
instigating the attempt to poison Colonel Phayre, of holding secret com- 
munications with certain Residency servants, and of giving them bribes for 
improper purposes, were investigated by a Commission composed of the 
Chief Justice of Bengal as President, and having for its European 
members. Sir Richard Meade, who had presided over the former Commission, 
and Mr. P. S. Melvill ; Maharajah Scindia, the Maharajah of Jeypore, and Sir 
Dinkur Rao were the native members. The European members considered 
the charges proved. Scindia and Sir Dinkur Rao found the graver imputa- 
tions not proved, while the Maharajah of Jeypore thought that Mulhar Rao 
was not implicated in any of the charges. 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar. 187 

Meanwhilej independently of the enquiry into the attempt to poison 
Colonel Phayre, much additional proof of Mulhar Rao's unfitness for power 
had been accumulated. As the Commissionei's were divided in opinion, the 
decision of the Home Government was not based upon the report of the Com- 
mission, nor did it assume that the result of the enquiry had been to prove 
the truth of the imputations against the Gaekwar; but, having regard to all 
the circumstances relating to the affairs of Baroda from the date of Mulhar 
Rao's accession to power, to his notorious misconduct, his gross misgovern- 
ment of the State, and his evident incapacity to carry into effect the necessary 
reforms, the Home Government decided that Mulhar Rao should be deposed 
from the sovereignty of the Baroda State, and that he and his issue should 
be precluded from all rights, honours, and privileges appertaining thereto. 

A Proclamation (No. XCVI.) was therefore issued to this effect on 19th 
April 1875, and Mulhar Rao was deported to Madras. 

As the British Government was desirous to mark its sense of the loyal 
services of Khundee Rao Gaekwar in 1857, the request of his widow that she 
might be allowed to adopt some member of the Gaekwar House, whom the 
Government of India might select as the most suitable person upon whom to 
confer the Baroda State, was acceded to. Her choice with the approval of 
Government fell upon Gopal Rao, a descendant of Pertab Rao, son of Peelajee 
Gaekwar, and he was installed as Gaekwar of Baroda on a7th May 1875. 

"With the consent of Maharajah Holkar, in whose service he was, Sir 
Madhava Rao was appointed minister of the Baroda State. The political 
charge of the State is in the hands of an Agent to the Governor-General, 
under the orders of the Government of India. 

The British Government has the right of controlling salt-works and the 
opening of new ports in the Gaekwar's territories. 

The area of the Gaekwar's territories is 4,399 square miles, the revenue 
Rupees 1,15,00,000, and the population 2,000,225 souls. The military force 
of the State consists of 42 field and 2 other guns with 166 artillerymen, 516 
cavalry and 3,078 infantry. Besides this regular force there is a large num- 
ber of irregulars consisting of 5,073 feudal, jaghiredar, and other cavalry, 
1,565 Nagas, Meenas and other special bodies, and 5,066 tehsil sepoys, 
nujeebs, &c. The Gaekwar receives a salute of twenty-one guns. 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— Nos. LXXV. & LXXVI. 



189 



N.o. LXXV. 

TeEATT with PUTTEH SiNG, 1773. 



Seal of 
Futteh Sing. 




AaKEEMENT between William Andbew Pbice, Esq., Chief for alTairs of the Beitish Na- 
tion, in behalf of the Honoiteable United East India Company, on the one 
part, and Ftjtteh Sing Guikwae on the other part. 

The town of Baroacb, lately belonging to Mahazuz Khan, Nawab, hav- 
ing been conquered by the victorious arms of the Honourable Company, it is 
stipulated and agreed that everything shall remain on the footing it was at 
the time of the said conquest J the English and Futteh Sing each receiving 
their share of the revenues, in the proportions they then stood, both within 
the town and territory annexed thereto. In this there is not to be any differ- 
ence. Agreeable to the above everything is to continue. 

This is the agreement sealed by both parties, the 13th day of January 
1773, or the 18th of Shewwel, in the 1186th year of the Hegira. 



No. LXXVI. 

Teanslation of the Teeatt between Rogoonath Row Pundit Puedan on one part, 
and PuTTEH Sing and Sevajee Row Shumshee Bahadooe on the other part. 

That Sevajee and Futteh Sing Shumsher Bahadoor had disobeyed and 
joined with the rebels, but now, by the means of Colonel Keatinge, for and in 
behalf of the Honourable United English Company, have by promising pre- 
sents accommodated matters with Pundit Purdan. The following are the 
Articles of their proposals : — 

Aeticle 1. 

That Sevajee and Futteh Sing Guikwar Shumsher Bahadoor do hereby 
agree to pay the sum of eight lakhs of rupees every year to the Sircar. 

Aeticle 3. 
That they are, as usual, to attend with a troop of 3,000 good horse and 
men, which numbers are not to be lessened. 

Aeticle 3. 
In Mhado Rao's time they used to pay every year three lakhs of rupees 
to Govind Rao Guikwar Shumsher Bahadoor, which sum it is settled not to 
pay him henceforth, and about which Govind Rao is to make no claim against 
Sevajee and Futteh Sing. 



190 Baroda Agency— The G-aekwar— Wo.-LXXVII. 

Article 4. 

Conde Rao Guikwav Jumusli Bahadoor is to be countenanced on the same 
footing and agreeable to the assentment made in the time of the late 
Damajee Rao, deceased. 

Article 5. 

That the government and revenues of the pergunnah of Baroach have 
been ceded to the Honourable Company agreeable to the agreement made 
between them and Sheremunth Punt Purdan, about which Sevajee and 
Futteh Sing are not to make any dispute. 

Article 6. 

The pergunnahs of Chickly, Veriow near Surat, and Koval near Nerbud- 
da, and about 15 coss distance from Baroach, which altogether makes three 
pergunnahs, the Guikwar has ceded to the Honourable Company for ever on 
account of the peace they made between the Guikwar and Sheremunfh Punt 
Purdan. 

Article 7. 

That in the Court of Sheremunth Punt Purdan the Guikwar must pay 
a due attention to everything tbat is reasonable, without having any commu- 
nication with the enemies. 

Article 8. 

That for the confirmatioir and compliance of the above Articles, the 
Honourable Company stand security, and should the Guikwar appear any 
ways false, the Honourable Company are not to preserve them. 

Ragoba is also to fulfil the above said Articles without any difference. 



No. LXXVII. 



Teeatt as ratified by the Supeemb Teeatt as priginally concluded and exchanged 

GovEENMENT in 1780. with Futteh Sing in 1780. 

Teeatt between the Honoueable Enu- Teeatt between the Honotteable Bnolish 

LisH East India Compant and Putteh East India Compant and Futteh Sing 

Sing Eao Guikwae Shumshbe Baha- Eao Guikwae Shumshee Bahadooe, 

DOOE, concluded at the village of Can- concluded at the village of Candeela, in 

DEELA, in the Peegunnah of DuBHOT, the Peegunnah of Dubhot, January 26th, 

• January 26th, 1780. 1780. 

The ministers of the Mahratta The ministers of the Mahratta State 
State having refused to accept of the having refused to accept of the reason- 
reasonable terms of accommodation able terms of accommodation offered 
offered them by Brigadier General them fey Brigadier General Thomas 
Thomas Goddard in the name of the Goddard in the name of the Honour- 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— No. LXXVII. 



191 



Honourable Governor-General and 
Council of Fort William, and by 
tlieir obstinate perseverance in hostile 
intentions against the English com- 
pelled them to take up arms in de- 
fence of their own rights and pos- 
sessions, the Honourable the Presi- 
dent and Select Committee of Bom- 
bay, with the sanction and approba- 
tion of the Honourable Governor- 
General and Council of Fort William, 
have appointed and authorized Bri- 
gadier General Goddard to settle and 
conclude a Treaty of lasting peace 
and alliance betwixt the Honourable 
the East India Company on one part, 
and Futteh Sing Rao Guikwar 
Shumsher Bahadoor, for and in the 
name of all the Guikwar family, on 
the other, and the following are the 
Articles of convention mutually en- 
tered into : — 

Article 1. 

A Treaty between the Chiefs of 
the English Company and Futteh 
Sing Rao Guikwar Shumsher Ba-' 
hadoor is concluded under solemn 
engagements, that the friends of 
the one shall be the friends of the 
other, and the enemies of the one, 
the enemies of the other. If any 
one shall invade the territories of 
the English, it shall be incumbent 
on Rao Shumsher to punish him, 
and if any one shall invade the 
country of the said Rao, the Chiefs 
of the English Company shall use 
their endeavours to repel him. In 
this let no deviation happen. 

Article 3. 

Whereas the ministers of Poona 
have repeatedly violated the Treaty 
which under the strongest engage- 
ments they entered into with the 
Chiefs of the English Company, and 
whereas they have committed various 
acts of hostility towards the English, 



able Governor General and Council 
of Fort William, and by their obsti- 
nate perseverance in hostile intentions 
against the English compelled them 
to take up arms in defence of their own 
rights and possessions, the Honourable 
the President and Select Committee 
of Bombay, with the sanction and 
approbation of the Honourable the 
Governor General and Council of Fort 
William, have appointed and authorized 
Brigadier General Goddard to settle 
and conclude a Treaty of lasting 
peace and alliance betwixt the Honour- 
able English East India Company on 
the one part, and Futteh Sing Rao 
Guikwar Shumsher Bahadoor, for and 
in the name of all the Guikwar 
family on the other, and the following 
are the Articles of convention mu- 
tually entered into : — 

Article 1. 

The English and Futteh Sing Rao 
agree to a league of defensive alliance, 
and to protect each other against all 
foreign enemies whatever. 



Article 2. 

The ministers of the Mahratta State 
by repeated violations of Treaty, as well 
as their late conduct, having drawn on 
themselves the just resentment of the 
English; having also by undue acts of 
oppression proved themselves the ene- 
mies of Futteh Sing : for these reasons 



192 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— Wo. LXXVII. 



and having also bound their loins 
with enmity against Putteh Sing 
Rao Guikwar Shumsher Bahadoor 
have greatly oppressed him^ where- 
fore it has become necessary for our 
mutual honor to check and resent 
the injuries which have been com- 
mitted by the ministers of Poona^ 
it is therefore at present agreed that 
having removed the government of 
the ministers of Poona from the 
country of Guzerat, we will conquer 
and possess ourselves of the whole 
country of Guzerat and the soubah 
of Ahmcdabad, and make such an 
arrangement that the ministers shall 
not be able to receive or collect a 
single Daum from that country. 

Article 3. 

The share of the country of 
Guzerat belonging to the Guikwar 
shall be continued and kept entire, 
and the share of the ministers of 
Poona shall be enjoyed by the 
English Company, and Rao Shum- 
sher Bahadoor shall support and 
assist the Chiefs of the English 
Company in taking it and in keep- 
ing possession of it, and the Chiefs 
of the English Company shall not 
fail to support and assist Rao Shum- 
sher Bahadoor in the defence and 
maintenance of his share. 

Article 4. 

As it is of particular importance 
to settle the country, and as a Treaty 
of union is established betwixt Rao 
Futteh Sing Shumsher Bahadoor 
and the English, Rao Shumsher 
Bahadoor engages that he will sup- 
ply for the present war three thou- 
sand horse as usual, and further as 
many more as he can at the requisi- 
tion of the Chiefs of the English 
Company, and will perform all that 
is incumbent on a conjunction of 
interests. 



and because the most firm and sincere 
friendship has long subsisted betwixt 
the Honourable Company and Putteh 
Sing, the contracting parties mutually 
agree to enter immediately into an 
offensive league, excluding the govern- 
ment of Poona from all share of coun- 
try in the province of Guzerat what- 
ever. 



Article 3. 
The English agree to support and 
defend Putteh Sing in possession of his 
sliare of the Guzerat province; and 
Putteh Sing is to assist and support the 
English in possessing themselves of, 
and maintaining the share now held by, 
the government of Poona. 



Article 4. 

In order to accomplish this service, 
as a firm friendship is now established 
betwixt the English and Putteh Sing, 
the latter agrees to join the English- 
with three thousand horse according to 
custom, and as many more as he can 
possibly raise, to act in conjunction with 
them during the present war, when- 
ever they shall call upon him to do so. 



Baroda Agency—The Gaekwar— No. LXXVII. 



193 



Article 5. 

Whereas in the divisions held by 
the Guikwar and the ministers of 
Poena respectively, by reason of the 
double government which exists in 
the same town, and the vicinity of 
their villages to one another, dis- 
putes and quarrels daily take place, 
the collection of the revenues of the 
country is impeded and prejudiced, 
and the ryots are distressed : the 
English Chiefs are for these reasons 
desirous of settling a new partition, 
so that a Treaty having mutually 
taken place no difEerences may 
arise ; ' and with a view to the inter- 
ests and welfare of both, a portion 
of country equal to the share held 
at present by the ministers of Poena, 
according to the established collec- 
tions and customary receipts of 
revenue, shall, after the conquest of 
these districts, be given in exchange 
to the Company. It is intended 
that there shall not be a Dauna 
difference. 

Article 6. 

The city of Ahmedabad, together 
with the pergunnahs, that is to say, 
the whole of the country lying on 
the other side of the river Myhee, 
which is now possessed by the Poena 
government, shall be conquered and 
given to Rao Shumsher Bahadoor, 
and in exchange for it the per- 
gunnahs of Surat Attaveessee, and 
the chouth of the city of Surafc, 
shall be allotted to the share of the 
English Company ; whatever diffei'- 
ence may arise in the revenue of 
the respective shares by this ex- 
change shall be adjusted according to 
the preceding Article. 

Article 7. 

Whenever Rao Shumsher Baha- 
door shall require troops to conquer 

IV 



Article 5. 

As the present mode of partition be- 
twixt the Poena government and 
Putteh Sing is attended with great loss 
and inconvenience from the disputes 
that must arise from the interference 
of the officers of each in collecting the 
revenues of the same places and that 
lay interspersed with one another, it is 
agreed upon that a new settlement of 
the province of Guzerat shall take 
place for the mutual benefit and con- 
venience of both parties, the express 
object of which will be an absolute and 
specific partition of the whole territory 
betwixt the Honourable East India 
Company and Putteh Sing, according 
to the proportion of the revenues now 
respectively held by him ^d the Mah- 
rattas. 



Article 6. 

Ahmedabad and its dependencies, 
that is to say, the country to the 
north of the river Myhee, now pos- 
sessed by the Poona government, to be 
allotted to Putteh Sing, in lieu of 
which the English are to be put in 
possession of the Guikwar division of 
the country, south of the Taptee, known 
by the name of Attaveessee, and their 
share in the revenue of the city of 
Surat. 



Article 7. 
The English will give such assistance 
of force as Futteh Sing may require to 

25 



194 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— Ifo. LXXVII. 



the country comprehended under the 
share of the ministers of Poena and 
laying on the other side of the river 
Myhee, they shall be supplied by 
the English Company. 



conquer and put him in possession of 
the Poena share of the country to the 
north of the Myhee. 



Article 8. 

After the partition of the country 
of Guzerat is effected, each party 
shall have the sole government in 
the districts allotted to their res- 
pective shares, and shall have no 
dependence on one another except 
when any enemy shall invade the 
country of Rao Shumsher Baha- 
door, in vrhich case assistance shall 
be brought by the English Com- 
pany; and if any enemy shall in- 
tade the share of country allotted 
to the English Company, Rao Shum- 
sher Bahadoor shall afford support 
and assistance; and this partition 
of the country of Guzerat, which 
hath with mutual approbation been 
settled betwixt Rao Shumsher Baha- 
door and the English Company, 
shall perpetually remain and be 
continued to their respective des- 
cendants and successors. In no 
respect shall it be broken through by 
either. 



Article 8. 

The final partition and settlement of 
the Guzerat province being made, each 
party is to have the distinct and sole 
government and possession of the divi- 
sion allotted to him, and to hold his 
share independent of and unconnected 
with the other, except when united for 
their common defence against a foreign 
enemy, which they mutually and in the 
most solemn manner agree to do in case 
of such attack being made upon either, 
and this partition and settlement mu- 
tually agreed to is to be binding upon 
them and their posterity for ever. 



Article 9. 

Agreeable to the representation of 
Rao Futteh Sing Bahadoor the 
money which he annually sends to 
Poona must not be sent, he must 
keep it with himself ; whenever any 
negotiation for peace shall take place 
with the ministers of Poona, the 
interest and welfare of Rao Shum- 
sher Bahadoor shall first be dis- 
cussed. The interests of Rao Shum- 
sher Bahadoor and the interests 
of the Company are one and the 
same. 



Article 9. 

Futteh Sing having requested that 
the English support him in withholding 
the annual tribute hitherto paid by 
him to the Poona government, it is 
stipulated that the Honourable Com- 
pany will do so till a final peace shall 
be concluded betwixt them and the 
Poona government, in which the in- 
terest of Futteh Sing shall be carefully 
and equally attended to with their 
own. 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— N"o. LXXVII. 



195 



Article 10. 

As the above Article is for the 
advantage of Rao Futteh Sing Shum- 
sher Babadoor, he, from the friend- 
ship and regard which he bears 
towards the Chiefs of the English 
Company, shall make over to the 
Company the district of Zinnore, 
together with the villages of Baroach, 
which are at present in his posses- 
sion. Whatever difference may 
arise in the revenue of the respec- 
tive shares by this exchange shall 
be adjusted according to the fifth 
Article. 



Aeticle 10. 

In consideration of the advantage 
that will arise to Futteh Sing from 
the above Article, and as a proof of 
his sincere regard and friendship for 
the English, he agrees to cede to them 
the district of Zinnore, and th'e villages 
situated in the Baroach pergunnah, 
now belonging to him, both which are 
to remain for ever in the possession of 
the Company. 



Aeticle 11. 
All the pergunnahs and villages 
above mentioned shall be delivered 
over to the Chiefs of the Company 
from the day on which the city of 
Ahmedabad is delivered over to Rao 
Shumsher Bahadoor ; from the day 
on which possession is taken of the 
city of Ahmedabad, the revenues of 
the above pergunnahs shall be 
enjoyed by the English Company, 
and from that day no claim of col- 
lection shall be made on account of 
the time past in these pergunnahs. 



Article 11. 

All the countries and places made 
over to the English in this Treaty by 
Futteh Sing are to be delivered into 
their hands, and the collections ac- 
counted for to them from the day that 
Futteh Sing is put in possession of the 
city of Ahmedabad; and no demands 
of collection for any past time is to be 
made on them by Futteh Sing. 



Article 13. 

It is agreed that two copies of 
this Treaty be immediately sent to 
the Honourable President and Select 
Committee of Bombay for their 
approbation, and to be by them 
transmitted to the Honourable Gov- 
ernor General and Council of Fort 
William, under whose sanction if is 
concluded, in order to receive their 
final confirmation and ratification, 
after which one copy so authenti- 
cated is to remain with the Honour- 



Aeticle 13. 

It is agreed that two copies of this 
Treaty be immediately sent to the 
Honourable President and Select Com- 
mittee of Bombay for their approba- 
tion, and to be by them transmitted 
to the Honourable Governor General 
and Council of Fort William, under 
whose sanction it is concluded, in order 
to receive their final confirmation and 
ratification, after which one copy so 
authenticated is to remain with the 
Honourable President and Select Com- 



186 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— No. LXXVII. 



able President and Select Committee mittee of Bombay and another with 

of Bombay and another with Futteh Futteh Sing. 

Sing. 

(Sd.) T. GODDAED. 



(A trne translation.) 

(Sd.) Dalhousib Watherstoa'Ej 

Persian Translator. 




This Treaty was ratified by the 
seal of the Company and the signa- 
tures of the Members of the Su- 
preme Council on 26th June 1780. 



This Treaty was signed, sealed, and 
delivered to the contracting parties by 
each other in the presence of us, who 
have hereunto signed our names. 

(Sd.) John Cockekell, 
Quarter Master General. 

„ Edwaud Heard, 

Adjutant GeneraL 



N.B. — A copy of this Treaty was 
also written in Persian, and the Articles 
respectively placed opposite to the 
English ones, and signed as follows : — • 



(Sd.) 



T. GODDARD. 



The Seal of 
the Company. 



Futteh Sing, 
his Seal. 



Futteh Sing'a 
signature. 



(Sd.) GOVIND OPAL, 

TJie Rajah's Beioan. 

„ EOLAJBB SciNDIA, 

Married to the daughter of Syajee^ 
Futteh Sing's brother. 



Note. — The Treaty, as modified and ratified by the Supreme Government, does not appear 
to have been finally exchanged with Futteh Sing. The Treaty, of Salbye,* however, cancelled 
both Treaties. 

• Vol. v., p. il. 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— No. LXXVIII. 197 



No. LXXVIII. 

Aeticles of Convention between the Honoiteable -Tonathan Duncan, Esq., Peesident 
and GovBENOE in Cottnoil of Bombay, for and on behalf of the Honotteable East 
India Company, of the one part, and Raojee Appajee, for and on behalf of Anttnd 
Rao GtriKWAE Sena Khas Khbyl Shumshbe Bahadooe of the other part, for the 
security of the dominion and government of the Guikwae in Guzeeat. 

Akticlb 1. 

The said Raojee Appajee having solicited the assistance of the English 
troops against Mulhar Rao, with a view of bringing him to reason, either by 
peaceable or hostile means, so as to prevent his ruining the country of the 
State of the Guikwar, of which Anund Rao is the proper and legitimate heir 
and head, and the English troops, under the command of Major Walker, 
having accordingly arrived in the territories of the Guikwar, and the said 
Raojee Appajee being also come to Cambay to meet the Honourable the 
Governor, it is hereby agreed by and between them that the expense already 
incurred, and such others as may hereafter be occasioned, for the pay, allow- 
ances, and transportation of the troops, expenditure, and transportation of 
stores, ammunition, &e., shall be accounted for and paid, with interest, at the 
rate of three quarters per cent, per month of thirty days, by the said Raojee 
Appajee, on Anund Rao Guikwar, and the State aforesaid, in two instal- 
ments ; the first to become due on or before the 5th of October next, and 
the second on or before the 5th of January 1803, for the security of which 
he assigns and mortgages the Guik war's share of the district of Attaveessee, 
near Surat, hereby agreeing that, on failure of the first instalment, the Eng- 
lish are to take possession of the said country, and to retain the same under 
their own collection and management, until the whole be fully cleared and 
made good to the Honourable Company, with interest. 

Article 2. 

It is further hereby stipulated' between the Honourable East India 
Company and the Guikwar State that the latter shall permanently subsidize 
from the Honourable Company a force of about two thousand sepoys, one 
company of European artillery, and its proportion (consisting of two com- 
panies) of lascars, the estimated expense of which, including establishment 
of stores, being about Rupees 65,000 per month. It is hereby agreed that 
landed jaidad or funds be assigned so as fully to cover this expense, and 
whatever it may amount to, from such part of the Guikwar territories as 
may be hereafter fixed on, in view to the greatest convenience of both parties ■ 
but this Article is not to be carried into effect till the war against Khurree 
be closed, when it is also proposed, through the co-operation of the English, 
to effect a reduction in the number of the Arab force now kept up, and mean- 
while this is to be considered as an eventual and to remain at present an 
entirely secret Article. 

Article 3. 

The pergunnah of Chowrassee and the Guikwar's share of the chouth 
of Surat having been ceded to the Honourable Company in pursuance of the 



198 Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— No. LXXIX. 



engagement, by letters to that effect from the late Govind Rao to the 
Honourable the Governor of Bombay, the same is hereby confirmed for 
ever. 

Article 4. 

This agreement to be binding and permanent when ratified by the 
Supreme Government of Bengal, vsrho, in all political concerns, control the 
other Presidencies, but in the mean time to be in full force. 

In witness whereof the parties have interchangeably set hereunto their 
hands and seals, in Carnbay, this 15th day of March 180^. 



(Sd.) J, Duncan. 



L. s. 



(Sd.) Raojee Appajee. 



Seal of 

the Guikwar 

State. 



No. LXXIX. 



Articles of Ageeement between the Honotjeable Jonathan Duncan, Esq., Pbesident 
and GovEENOE of Bombay, for and in behalf of the Honoueablb East India Company 
and Kao IBB Appajee, the Dbwan or Ministee of Antjnd Rao Guikwae Sena Khas 
Khetl Shumshee Bahadooe, for and in behalf of the said Anttnd Eao Guikwae, 
in virtue of the full powers vested in the said Eaojee Appajee to treat and settle for 
the affairs of the Guikwae principality with the said Goveenoe of Bombay, which 
powers hear date the 3rd of Zilkad, or 8th of March, in the year of Our lord 1802. 

AUTICLE 1. 

Whereas certain Articles were, under date the 15th of March last, 
answering to the 1 0th Zilkad, entered into, under the above mentioned full 
powers, by the said contracting parties in reference to the war then carrying 
on against Mulhar Rao, and providing for the Guikwar government's 
defraying the whole expense thereof, and for its subsidizing a permanent 
force from the Honourable Company, and ceding to them the pergunnah of 
Chowrassee and the Guikwar's share of the chouth of Surat ; all these stipu- 
lations are herein declared to be in full force, and of equal strength and 
validity as if repeated in the present Treaty. 

Article 2. 
Mulhar Rao having commenced hostilities with the State of Anund Rao 
Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor, and taking possession of 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— No. LXXIX. 199 



Vessanagur, induced Anund Rao to solicit the assistance of a British force 
for the purpose of effectually reducing Mulhar Rao and taking his fort of 
Kurree, upon which the English sent a force to Cambay, with the view of 
bringing the said Chieftain to reason^ either by peaceable or hostile means; 
and the latter having in consequence been pursued, on account of Mulhar 
Rao's not abiding by the advice of the English, the war has since terminated 
successfully for the State of Anund Rao, who has in consequence entered on 
possession of the fort of Kurree and of its pergunnahs, and of Mulhar Rao's 
other territories, and made a provision for him in the pergunnah of Neryad, 
ceding also to the English Company the pergunnah of Chickly, situated in 
the district of the Surat Attaveessee, in full" sovereignty for ever, as a sponta- 
neous mark of his gratitude for their assistance in overcoming this opposition 
to his authority. 

Aeticlb 3. 
By the second Article of the convention of the 15th of March last, it is 
stipulated that jaidad or landed funds equal to the income of Rupees 65,000 
per month shall be assigned to the Honourable Company to defray the expense 
of the subsidized force ; but as, from the present encumbered and mortgaged 
state of the districts composing the Guikwar principality, these assignments 
cannot be effected, and the Honourable Company put into possession during 
the current year, beginning from the Mirgh of 1859, or June 1802, it 
is hereby agreed that the payment of the subsidy for this term shall be 
secured, according to the condition of a separate bond executed for this 
purpose, under the present date, and that the assignment of land to the Ho- 
nourable Company shall be effectively and fully accomplished by the Mirgh 
of 1860, beginning in June 1803. Tliis subsidy to be chargeable to the 
Guikwar State from the period referred to in the Convention of the 15th 
March. 

Article 4. 

The second Article of the convention of the 15th March last, proposing 
to effect a reduction in the number of the Arab force under the Guikwar gov- 
ernment, the principal obstacle to which consists in want of ready money 
funds for the liquidation of the arrears of such part of the said establishment 
as it is proposed to disband, and the Honourable Company meaning to extend 
to this effect some pecuniary assistance to the Guikwar State, the repayment 
of this amount is to take place and be secured in manner following : — 

The first payment of interest by the Mirgh of 1860, or June 1803 ; the 
second year's interest, and one-third of the. principal, by the Mirgh of 1861, 
or June 1804 ; and all the remaining principal and interest by the Mirgh of 
1862, or June 1805. But in the event of failing in the above stipulated pay- 
ments, the revenue of the pergunnahs of Barodra, Coral, Sinnore, Petlaud, 
and Ahmedabad, to the full amount of the russud, which will be about 
Rupees 11,75,000 per annum, shall be collected by the Company, in proportion 
to the advance that may be made by them ; and when this debt is fully paid, 
the. collection of that part of the revenue from the above named pergunnahs 
shall revert again to the administration of the government of Barodra. 



200 Baroda Agency— The G-aekwar— Wo. LXXIX. 



Article 5. 
There shall be a true friendship and good understanding between the Ho- 
nourable English East India Company and the State of Anund Rao Guikwar, 
in pursuance of which the Company will grant the said Chief its countenance 
and protection in all his public concerns, according to justice and as may 
appear to be for the good of the country, respecting which he is also to listen 
to advice. And the State of the Guikwar having represented sundry points 
to the Governor in which it is interested, he has assured Raoba of the general 
attention of the Honourable Company to protect the administration of Anund 
Rao in all their rights, and to be aiding to its concerns with His Highness 
the Peishwa, or elsewhere, on all just occasions, where their assistance may 
prove requisite and useful* 

Aeticlb 6. 
For the cultivation and promoting the permanency of the good under- 
standing between the two States, there shall be a constant good correspondence 
kept up between them, and agents reciprocally appointed to reside with each. 



Article 7. 

In future the subjects of each State who may take refuge with either 
shall be delivered up, if the State from which such party or parties shall have 
fled appear to have any demand of debt, or any just claim against him or 
them ; but as a free intercourse between the countries and the two govern- 
ments is also intended, frivolous claims against parties resorting from their 
own to the other jurisdiction are not to be preferred, and in all serious cases 
cordiality will be shown. 

Aeticle 8. 
This agreement to "be binding and permanent when ratified by the 
Supreme Government of Bengal, which, in all political concerns, controls all 
the other Presidencies ; but in the mean time to be in full force. 

In witness whereof the parties to the foregoing Articles of Agreement 
have interchangieably put their hands and seals, in Cambay, this 6th day of 
June, in the year of our Lord 1803. 

(Sd.) Jonathan Duncan. 

Signed, sealed, and delivered in the presence of 

(Sd.) A. Walker. 
,, Kahmauleddeen. 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— Ho. LXXIX. 201 



Translation of a Sunntjd or Grant of Chicklt written in the form of a letter to the 

. HONOUBABLK JONATHAN DUNCAN, EsQ., PeBSIDENT and GOVERNOR of BoMBAT, by 

Anund Eao Guikwar Sena Khas Khetl Shumsheb Bahadooe. 



& 



After compliments. — Mulhar Rao Guikwdr Himufc Bahadoor bein_ 
indebted to us I'or the arrears of our annual accounts, and having' exchanged 
babanders or securities for the future good behaviour on both sides, a settle- 
ment had taken place. In the present year Mulhar Rao unjustly raised a 
quarrel with us, and without paying any regard to the bahanders or securities 
we sent to him for the purpose of discussing the subject, the fort of Vessana- 
gur was taken from us, and he occasioned much disturbance in our country. 
Babajee Appajee, in his proceeding with troops to Katia and Katiavod, was 
opposed by him, and there ensued a battle. In consequence of this we despatched 
Kohmauleddien Hossein Khan Bahadoor and Gopal Rao Bapojee to you, and 
begged the assistance of the Company Bahadoor, on condition that we shall 
defray the charges of their troops, for which a due provision has been 
separately made ; but in testimony of our sense of the seasonable assistance 
afforded to us by the Honourable Company, we now make the Company a 
present of Chickly, within the province of Surat Attaveessee, to be taken 
possession of by the English at the beginning of the approaching year, or 
Suvant 1859, and to enjoy the benefit of it for ever. In this pergunnah, 
whatever are the gifts and donations, such as annuities, enams of villages and 
grounds, charitable allowances, and the rights of the zemindars, may be 
observed and allowed for, according to the usual rules, and the balance of the 
present year against that pergunnah may be discharged agreeable to its 
accounts. 

Bated, Ind Suffer 1858, or Uh June 1802. 



Malsa Kaunt in the Eajah's own handwriting. 

I, Anund Rao Guikwar Sena Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor, do hereby con- 
firm and ratify such compacts and agreements as my faithful Dewan, Raqjee 
Appajee, hath in my name and on my behalf made and concluded with the 
Honourable the Governor of Bombay. 

Article 1. 

I hereby confirm and ratify such grants of lands as my said Dewan, 
Riiojee Appajee, has made to the Honourable Company, either in enam or 
jaidad ; and I also declare that I hold myself, my heirs and successors, bound 
to repay in money, or in such further landed assignments as may be sufficient 
for the purpose, all debts and expenses which the English Government have 
been at or contracted in the course of their military operations in Guzerat 
undertaken for the support of my government. 



202 Baroda Ageney-The Gaekwar--No. LXXIX. 



AUTICLE 2. 

I entirely approve and highly commend the prudence of my Dewan in 
having obtained a body of English troops to remain permanently in this 
country^ as on their courage and fidelity I place an unlimited dependence. 

I have determined that the payment of this subsidiary force shall com- 
mence from the firat of this month, English style, or first of Assar 1859, 
Hindoo era. 

AUTICLE 3. 

As I repose an entire confidence in the English, I depend on their 
friendship to shield me from misfortunes. I am sensible that there are many 
evil disposed persons amongst the Arabs, who disregarding my legal authority, 
have plotted against my liberty and even my life. 

By the favour of God they have been defeated ; but should their wicked 
machinations at any time hereafter succeed, I shall expect the English to 
release me, and desire that all my acts and deeds, although executed by me in 
the usual form, while in that state of restraint, may be considered as of no 
validity. I desire, therefore, that my subjects will pay no attention to my 
orders in this situation, but hear what Major Walker has to say, strictly 
following his directions, and assisting him in every measure that he shall 
devise or direct for restoring my person to freedom. - 

Whoever, in short, shall either bring Canojee into the managemenb of 
affairs, or shut me up in tlie fort of Baroda, or elsewhere, is a rebel, and I 
fully authorize the aforesaid Major Alexander Walker, or the person entrusted 
with the chief management of the Company's affairs in Guzerat, to chastise 
such disturbers of government, and bring them to that punishment which is 
due to those who endanger the person of their Sovereign in every part of the 
world. Thus, therefore, I order all the faithful officers of government, sil- 
ladars, sebundy, and others, on any of the foregoing events occurring, to obey 
Major Walker's orders. 

Aeticle 4. 

Whereas it is signified in certain Articles of agreement between the 
Honourable the Company and my Dewam, Raojee Appajee, that the English 
Government is disposed to assist in reducing the Arab force in my service, 
Major Walker, Resident on the part of the English Government at Baroda,' 
consents to assist me with a pecuniary loan to effect this reduction in the 
following terms. 

Aeticle 5. 
As it seems impossible that I can retrieve myself or my country from 
its present embarrassments, without reforming and reducing the expense in 
every department, I do hereby promise and agree to make the necessary 
reductions by degrees. The objects of reduction are contained in the annexed 
account ; and, if possible, they shall be effected at the periods specified oppo- 
site to each of the Articles. 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— No. LXXIX. 203 

Article 6. 
Before nny money is advaneedj Major Walker must be satisfied tliat a 
real and efEective reduction shall take place. For this purpose an exhibition 
must be made of the accounts, and a muster taken of the troops in the 
presence of three persons, viz., one on the part of the Company, one on the 
part of the Guikwar government, and the third by such of the Jemadars or 
Parokhis as may be the agents of the sebundy. According' to this muster 
the account shall be taken and discharged. 

Akticle 7. 

I do hereby further agree and promise that I shall positively reduce the 
Arab and other force, within six or eight months after the present reduction 
is accomplished, to the standard of Futteh Sing's time ; but to enable me to 
perform this stipulation, it will be necessary for the English Government to 
assist me as they have done on the present occasion. 

Article 8, 

Provision is already made in the fourth Article of agreement, executed 
and interchanged between the Honourable the Governor of Bombay and my 
Dewan Raojee Apjjajee, bearing date the 6th June, or 5th Suffer last, for 
the payment of the principal and interest of the money to be advanced by 
the Companj^ ; but as it has since been proposed to pay the same off one 
year sooner than is thereby provided, by applying the entire russud of the 
lands appropriated by that Article, to the amount of Rupees 11,75,000 per 
annum, to the discharging, in equal proportions, of the principal and interest 
of the money to be advanced by the Company, and by such other persons as 
may engage therein. Major Walker accepts of the modification by which 
the Company's advance may be liquidated one year sooner than it would be 
by a strict adherence to the letter of Treaty, it being, however, always under- 
stood that the provisions in the fourth Article of the said Treaty of the 6th 
June, or 5th Suffei-, are always in full force, the same as if this subsequent 
engagement had not been made, in the event of the repayment of the Honour- 
able Company's loan, as well of principal as of interest, failing to be made 
good in the more speedy mode now proposed. The amount of the above 
receipt, or russud, is to be collected every year from the Comavishdars of the 
pergunnahs allotted for this purpose, in the Treaty of the 6th June, by suck 
persons as the Government of Bombay may appoint. 

Article 9. 
Interest on that part of the pecuniary assistance and aid which the Com- 
pany may give on this occasion shall be reckoned and accounted for from 
the time the said Company may raise a loan for that purpose, and it shall 
be reckoned every six months, at the rate of three-quarters per cent, per 
month of thirty days, instead of every year or every twelve months. All or 
any loss by exchange, or otherwise, which may arise by bringing the money 
from Bombay to this place, shall be on my account, and made good by me 
and my successors. 



204 Baroda Agency— The Gaekwat— No. LXXIX. 

Article 10. 

Conformably to Major Walker^s suggestions and wishes, the Articles 
contained in this declaration were written, and to which I have given my 
assent; but in the event of evil disposed persons attempting anything unfair 
or unreasonable against my person, my Dewan, Raojee Appajee, his son, his 
brother, nephew, or relations, and Madho Rao Tatia Muzumdar, or even should 
I myself, or my successors, commit anything improper or unjust, the English 
Government shall interfere, and see, in either case, that it is settled according 
to equity and reason. 

I have also required of Major Walker, on the part of the Company, to 
promise that my State and government shall be permanent, and descend to the 
lineal inheritors of the musnud, and that the Dewanship shall be preserved to 
Raojee Appajee. 

In the last place, I desire to form the most intimate connection with the 
Company, and that all business with the Poona Durbar may be jointly managed 
by the English Resident and my vakeel. 

Such are my wishes and sentiments, so help me God ! 

Given at Baroda, Z9iA July 1802. 

Witness : 

(Sd.) GopAL Rao Bapojee, 

Vakeel in behalf of Sena Khas Kheyl 

Shumsher Bakadoor. 
Witness : 

(Sd.) Miguel de Lima Souza. 

The date of the Mahratta version, in the handwriting of the Dewan, 
as also the signature "Anund Rao Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher 
Bahadoor." The followiiig words are written in the Rajah's own hand : " the 
above writing is true." 



The Seal. 



Appendix to the Teeatt with Anund Rao Guikwae. 

Appendix No. 1. — Teanslation of an Engagement by Mulhae Eao Guikwae Himut 

Bahadooe to the Honoueable the Goveenoe of Bombay. 

Having through my misfortune fallen into a warfare with the State of 
Brodera, and been defeated by the army of the said State, assisted by the 
arms of the Honourable English East India Company, I surrendered myself 
on a promise of security to my life and my honour, since which the govern- 
ment of Brodera hath, at the instance of the Governor of Bombay, on the con- 



Baroda Agency— The G-aekwar— No. IiXXIX. 205 



dition of my sending for my family, and abstaining from all direct or indirect 
disturbance or conspiracy against either State, made tbe following provision 
for me, viz., that out of the pergunnah of Neryad (which is the ancient seat 
and abode of my predecessor) a jaidad of a lakh and a quarter of Rupees be 
assigned and committed to me for the suppprt of me and my children, family, 
and brothers, wherefore I agree and give in writing, that exclusive of watch- 
men, not to exceed two hundred men, and a due proportion of sebundy to 
make my collections, I am not to maintain any troops whatsoever hereby 
consenting that the officers of the Sircar of Brodera and of the English 
gentlemen may, at any time, after ascertaining the fact, cause any excess in 
my establishment, as above mentioned, to be dismissed. Neither am I ever 
to erect any fortifications, but to demean myself, as shall my son, brothers, 
and followers, in all respects as becomes a true well-wisher of both States, 
without any deviation or difference whatsoever. As my securities in which 
respects. Major Walker, on the part of the Honourable Company, and Meer 
Kehmauleddien Hossein Khan Bahadoor, have, at my instance, engaged their 
responsibility, and likewise undertaken to be the guardians of my rights, 
under this deed and engagement; and should there prove any deficiency in the 
jaidad of Rupees 1,25,000, those gentlemen are, by interposing with the 
oflicers of the Brodera government, to cause it to be made up. Besides this, 
if after experience had of my good behaviour and the sincerity of my heart, 
and there thence remaining no doubts respecting me, it should ever please 
Anund Rao Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor, with the approbation of 
the English Government, to make any increase in the present provision for 
me, I shall have cause to be thankful on that account. 

Dated \st of Suffer 1217, or 2nd of June 1802. 

N.B. — A copy of the original of this engagement has been deposited 
with the officers of Rajah Anund Rao's government. 



Appendix No. 2. — The Goveenoe of Bombay to Mitlhae Rao Himut Bahadooe. 

Having perused your engagement of the 1st of Suffer, I approve thereof : 
you are therefore in full security to repair and continue to dwell with your son 
and brothers, and now dispersed family (whom you are to send for) at Neiyad, 
on the terms of the Sunnud of the 5th of Suffer from Rajah Anund Rao Sena 
Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor ; and on condition of your acting according 
to the Sunnud in question, and conforming to your engagement aforesaid, you 
may be certain of enjoying the full protection of both Sircars, that is,' of the 
English and of Brodera, nor shall any one, either now or hereafter, have the 
power to occasion you causeless or unjust molestation. 

Bated Qih of June 1802, or Uh of Suffer 1217. 



(Sd.) Jonathan Duncan. 



The 
Company's 

Seal. 



20Q Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— Wo. LXXIX. 



Appendix No. 3. — From Mulhae Eao to Anund Eao Guikwae. 

After compliments. — Having' been indebted to you in money, and 
having bahanders or securities between us, I have created a dispute with you, 
and after entertaining forces, have taken your fort of Vessanagur, and occa- 
sioned disturbances in your country, and there ensued a battle with Babajee 
Appajee. 

This induced you to solicit the assistance of the English Bahadooi'. The 
Honourable Jonathan Duncan Bahadoor proposed to me a peaceable adjust- 
ment, which I did not attend to, wherefore the English, in prosecution of their 
support to you, have taken from me the fort of Kurree and all the territories 
belonging to me, and delivered them into your Sircar, and for myself made a 
provision of Rupees 1,25,000 per annum from the pergunnah of Neryad, 
which has been given to me through His Honour's means, which I shall 
accept, and together with my son, family, and brothers, will behave to you 
peaceably. With regard to my conduct the Honourable the Governor hath 
satisfied you, and according as he has thus signified, so shall we conduct our- 
selves peaceably, without deviation. This jaghire, which has been given me 
for the maintenance of my family, I shall enjoy, and remain contented with 
it. I have no sort of claim on you respecting my former places ; but if, in 
conformity to mj engagement, I shall continue to conduct myself peaceably, 
according to the Governor's order, you will get my jaidad a little increase 
from the Sircar. 

Bated the 2nd Suffer, or 3rd of June 1803. 

Major Walker, on the part of the English East India Company, and 
Meer Kehmauleddien Hossein Khan, are my bahanders or securities for the 
purpose of this writing 

(Sd.) Meer Kahmauleddien Hossein Khan, as guarantee. 
,) Major Walker, as guarantee. 



Appendix No. 4. — From Anttnd Eao to Mulitae Eao Guikwae Himxjt Bahadooe. 

After compliments. — The following are the Articles for the manage- 
ment of the villages given from the Sircar as a jaghire from the pergunnah 
Neryad, to the value of Rupees 1,25,000 for your expense and the mainte- 
nance of your family, viz. — 

\st. — The pergunnah of Neryad shall never experience any imposition for 
the exaction of labour, Binny Bandry, or other articles whatever. 

'i^nd. — The rule respecting hay, &c., will be continued to you, as it is 
usually observed in that pergunnah. 

2>rd. — In case of your being oppressed by the Coolies or Muwassies, and 
if you cannot overcome such difficulties yourself, a force shall be sent agree- 
ably to your requisition, and these evils shall be thereby removed. 



Baroda Agency-The Gaekwar— No. LXXIX. 207 

^ih. — Your relations and friends at Kurree shall never experience any 
molestation, provided they conduct themselves peaceably. 

^th. — You may receive from the pergunnah the Rupees 1;25,000 in the 
manner directed by its deed. 

6/^. — In case of any calamity, accident, or damage falling to the per- 
gunnah, a due allowance or credit will be given on examination of its 
accounts. 

The foregoing six Articles shall be complied with by the Sircar, for which 
Major Walker, on the part of the English East India Company, and Meer 
Kehmanleddin Hossein Khan Bahadoor, are given as guarantees and 
mediators. 

iLJi Suffer, or ?>th June 1802. 

Signature of Raoba, his Bewan. Anund Uao. 



N. B. — These Articles were particularly solicited by Mulliar Eao, and 
granted as an additional favour by Raoba, through the Governor's mediation, 
just previous to the latter taking leave to return to Bvodera. 

(Sd.) Jonathan Duncj>n. 



Appendix No. 5. — Tkanslation of a Lbttek from Antjnd Eao Gttikwak to Sucehabam 
Ohinnajeb, Soobhadae of SuEAT Attaveessee, dated 2nd Suffer 1858, or 4tli June 1802. 

On account of disturbances raised by Mulhar Rao Guikwar Himut 
Bahadoor with the Sircar, the Honourable Jonathan Duncan, Esq., President 
and Governur of Bombay, was called on for assistance, therefore the mehal of 
Chickly, within the province of Surat Attaveessee, has been given to the 
Honourable Company as a donation for them, to enter into possession at the 
beginning ^f the ensuing year 1859, excepting such gifts and allowances that 
this mehal is subject to, which shall be observed and complied with. 



Appendix No. 6. — Teanslation of a Lettee from Anund Eao Guikwae, &c., to Vitul 
Eao Babajee, Comavishdae of Chickly, dated the 2nd Suffer 1858, or 4th June 1802. 

In consequence of the disturbances raised by Mulhar Rao Guikwar 
Himut Bahadoor with the Sircar, the Honourable Jonathan Duncan, Esq., 
President and Governor of Bombay, having been applied to for assistance, the 



208 Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— No, L:£XIX. 



pergunnah of Chickly, within the limits of Surat Attaveessee, has been in 
consequence given to the Company of the English Bahadoor as an enam or 
donation, f(ir them to enter into possession of it at the beginning of the 
approaching year, of Suvant 1859 ; wherefore you will deliver over to the 
Company Bahadoor the charge of it accordingly. 



Appendix No. 7. — Teanslation of a Lettee from Anund Eao Guikwae, &c., to the 
Zemindaes of Chicklt, dated Jesta Soodhe 4tli, 1858, or 4th June 1802. 

In consequence of the disturbances raised by Mulhar Rao Guikwar 
Himut Bahadoor with the Sircar, the Honourable Jonathan Duncan, Esq., 
President and Governor of Bombay, was called on for assistance, therefore 
the Sircar has given to the. Company of the English Bahadoor the mehal 
of Chickly as a donation, to be taken possession of by them from the begin- 
ning of the Suvant 1859; saving always and subject to the gifts and dona- 
tions, such as daily allowances, annuities, enams of land and villages, chari- 
table allowances, darakdars, jassus, and the rights of the zemindars, &e., and 
whatever there may be in this mehal ; therefore you will be obedient to their 
orders, and attend to the annual gifts and exemptions above specified, as 
usual. 



Appendix No. 8. — Teanslation of a Letter from Anttnd Rao Guikwae Sena Khas 
Khetl Shumsher Bahadooe, to Myeal Naeaten, dated 5th Suffer, or 6th June 1802. 

After compliments. — Soorsun-esuney Myatein-wu-Ulf (the date of the 
year in Arabic) . 

On account of the English Company Bahadoor battalions or troops, 
expense Rupees 50,000 value in jaghire, from the pergunnah Nudyad, is made 
over; you will put them in possession accordingly. Signed and sealed. 



Appendix No. 9.— Teanslation of a Sunnud for Dholka, executed by Anund Rao 
Guikwae, to the Honoueable Jonathan Duncan, Esq., Peesident and Goveenoe, 
on behalf of the Honoueable Company, dated 5th Suffer, or 6th June 1802. 

A body of the Honourable Company's forces, consisting of two thousand 
men, besides the artillery, have been subsidized by our government : their 
charges are to commence from the date of the reduction of our Arab sebundy. 
Landed funds are to be assigned in discharge of this subsidy ; but for the 
ensuing year 1859, all the territories or mehals belonging to the Guikwar 
State having been encumbered by mortgages, these assignments cannot be imme- 
dia-tely carried into effect, wherefore it hath been agreed that at the begin- 
ning of the year 1860 the pergunnah oi Dholka shall be assigned towards 
defraying the charges of the subsidized troops, for their future services, and 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— Wo. LXXIX. 209 



accordingly, in the year 1860j this pergunnah shall be put into your posses- 
sion for the purposes of the above-mentioned charges. In this pergunnah of 
Dholka, whatever annuities, daily allowances, charitable allowances, donations, 
and darakdars allowances they may be, should be observed and continued. 
.In the 'same manner are also some villages in this pergunnah allowed for 
the private expenses of women of the Guikwar families, which are to be 
continued : the deficiency in the collection arising on this account shall be 
annually paid in cash. 



Appendix No. 10. — Teanslation of a Bond executed by Anund Eao Guikwae, to 
the HoNOUEABLE JONATHAN Dttnoan, Esq., Pebsident and GovEENOK, On behalf of 
the Honourable Company, dated 5th Suffer, or 6th June 1802. 

Whereas a body ,of the Honourable Company's troops, consisting of 
two thousand men, besides artillery, have been stationed with us, the expense 
of which is to commence from the date of the reduction of our Arab sebundy, 
and whereas we possess no means convenient to appropriate any land funds to 
defray their expense for the firit year, which amounts to Rupees 7,80,000; 
therefore, in part thereof, a jaidad, equal to Rupees 50,000 a year, from the 
villages of Neryad, has been assigned, and the balance (Rupees 7,30,000) 
shall be discharged within one year in cash, with nine per cent, interest, for 
which is pledged the revenue of Kurree, after deducting the real charges and 
the proceeds, or what shall be recovered, on account of the collections of 
Bhawnagur and of Katia and Katiavod, for the Grontoo years 1857 and 1858, 
or through any other means, the sum of Rupees 7,30,000 shall be discharged 
in readj'' money, in one year. For the due compliance with this, Babajee 
Appajee and Kehmauleddien Hossein Khan have been tendered and delivered 
as securities. 



Seal of 
Anuud Rao. 



Securities : 
Babajee Appajee, whose name 
is signed by Raojee, and Keh- 
mauleddien Hossein Khan. 




Appendix' No. 11.— Translation of a Sunnud from Anttnd Eao GiriEWAE to the 

HONOUEABLE JONATHAN DuNCAN, EsQ., PRESIDENT and GoTERNOE of BoMBAT, 

dated the 5th Suffer Suvan 1859. 

In consequence of the disturbances raised with this Sircar by Mulhar 
Rao Guikwar Himut Bahadoor, I have taken possession of his territories 
through your means, viz., Kurree, Cupperbund, Deogong, whilst for the 
maintenance of his family and himself it has been agreed to make a provi- 
sion in the pergunnah of Neryad, which, inclusive of the Kellodary or fort, 
IV 27 



210 Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— No. LXXIX. 



and articles situated therein, is known to be equal to a rental of Rupees 
2,25,001, out of which he (the said Mulhar Rao) shall, on his residing at 
Neryad with his family, possess as follows, subject to an established or former 
annual varauth or assignment, in favour of Kehmauleddien Hossein Khan, 
on account of his pay and allowances to the amount of Rupees 50,000 a year,, 
including which last varauth we have put in possession ,of Mulhar Rao 
the Cusba and such part of the villages of the said pergunnah as shall 
yield him Rupees 1,75,001 upon your being the guarantee, and the remain- 
der, to the amount of Rupees 50,000 of this pergunnah, comprehended 
in its villages, to that amount indiscriminately taken, is made over to you 
towards the charges of the subsidized troops, which amount you will accord- 
ingly receive on the said account. In this pergunnah whatever donation, 
annuities, and darakdars allowances are usually paid should be observed in 
proportion to the share of each party ; and the Comavishdars' balance on 
the mehal in question shall be rateably discharged by each according to the 
accounts thereof. 



Appeitdix No. 12. — From Antjnd Rao Gtjikwae Sena Khas Khetl Shtjmshbe Baha- 
DOOE, to the Zemindahs of the Peeguunah of Nudtad oi Neetad. 

Be it known to all, that out of the villages of this pergunnah, revenue 
funds amounting to Rupees 50,000 are assigned in part of the expense of the 
British subsidized troops. . 

You are directed to deliver the power in this jaghire to the English Com- 
pany Bahadoor from the beginning of the now commencing year, making 
over possession to them, and yielding obedience to their authority and man- 
agement. 

Bated JeyUood Uh, 1858, or Uh Suffer, Uh June 1802. 

Signed and sealed. 



Appendix No. 13. — Peivate Engagement to Raojeb Appajee. 

It is the intention of the government of Bombay that the Dewanship 
of Raojee Appajee in the Sircar of Brodera shall be permauent, and that his 
son, brothers, nephews, and relations and friends shall be likewise duly pro- 
tected and supported by the Honourable Company in their just rights ; and if 
the Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor, or anybody else, should 
unreasonably treat them ill, or ofBer any undue molestation, the Company will 
protect them by interfering in their behalf. In witness whereof I have here- 
unto put my hand and seal, at Cambay, this eighth day of June, in the vear 
of our Lord 1802. 

(Sd.) J. Duncan. 

Appendix No. 14.— Geant of the Village of Bhatta, in the Peegxtnnah of Chow- 

easse to Raojee Appajee. 

The Honourable English East India Company, placing the greatest reli- 
ance in the good faith and attachment of Raojee T^ppajee, Dewan of the 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— No. LXXIX. 211 



Guikwar State^ and having in view to extend always their permanent protec- 
tion to him and to his relations, have, for the purpose of his and their abode, 
granted to him, from the beginning of the current year 1859 (June 1802), in 
enam for himself, his sons, and their or his children, for ever, the village 
of Bhatta, in the pergunnah of Chowrassee, to the end that entering on the 
possession thereof, he may appropriate its produce to his support. 

Dated the Qth June 1802, or htJi Suffer 1215 of the Higera. 



Appendix No. 15. — Cambat, 27th February 1802. 

Mr. Miguel de Lima e' Souza having read and explained to us yesterday, 
the 26th instant, the several letters written to him by our vakeel, Gulabchund 
Taluckchund, at Bombay, making the Honourable English Company several 
proposals mentioned in them, for putting into their protection and possession 
our ports and territories stated in those letters, under several conditions there- 
in stipulated, we do hereby confirm the same, and promise never to deviate 
from any of the proposals made by our said vakeel, Gulabchund Taluckchund, 
in his several letters to the said Mr. Miguel de Lima e' Souza. In witness 
whereof Manabay Gorbay, his brother, uncle, and such of his relations who 
have a right in the territories mentioned by Gulabchund Talukchund in his 
letters to Mr. Miguel de Lima e' Souza, as are present at this place, have put 
their names to this, and the signature of others will be taken on their arrival 
at DoUerah. 

Witnesses. 

The above was written, read, 

explained, and signed before us, Tacooe Manabay Goubay. 

(Sd.) Robert Holi'oed. Tacooe Sessmutjee Sbbtojbe. 

„ Mungajee Rangajee. Tacoor Dessabay Razabay. 

„ Gulabchund Taluckchund. Tacooe Kullabay Goubay. 

Tacook Vagajeb Sessabay. 

Tacook Hackabay Cattahbay. 

Tacooe Sokuobay Satabay. 

DoUerah, hth March 1802. — The following people signed the paper on 
the other side, confirming the proposals made to the Governor of Bombay by 
Gulabchund Taluckchund in his several letters to Mr. Miguel de Lima 
e' Souza. 

Witnesses: The mark Q of Nathoojee Balliajeb. 

(Sd.) Gulabchund Taluckchund. 

MuNGAJEB Rangajeb. Tacoor Mungajee Rouzajee. 

Tacoor Bauabay Razajeb. 
Tacoor Rupabay Mozbb. 
Tacoor Unbzee Alliajee. 



212 Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— Wo. LXXIX. 



I, Bugwandoss Nathjee, in charge of the Desseyship of Dandooka, do 
hereby declare that the Girassias, who have ratified and confirmed by their 
signature in this the proposals made by their vakeel, Gulabchund Taluckchund, 
to the English Government in Bombay, in his several letters to Mr. Miguel 
de Lima e' Souza, being sent for, they one and all declared they have put 
their name to this paper, and that on the other side, from their free-will. In 
witness whereof I have put my name, in Dollerah, the 6th March 1802. 

BoUerah, the QiA March 1802. — Churassa Jeejee Agersingjee, inhabi- 
tant of Gamp, having just arrived, declared before Bugwandoss Nathjee 
that he had desired his relations, Lessajee Sallojee and Manabay Gorbay, to 
offer to the government of Bombay his and his family's villages Vaghar, 
Moriging, Sandially, Pimply, Timboo, Dawser, part of Cataria, and two 
other pieces of land, on the same terms as they might offer their own ; and 
having seen and had the terms read and explained to me, I do hereby con- 
firm them, and promise to abide by everything done and agreed upon by 
Lessajee Sollojee and Manabay Gorbay, through their agent, Gulabchund 
Taluckchund, agreeable to what is written in his several letters to Mr. Miguel 
de Lima e' Souza. In witness whereof he had made his mark in the jpresence 
of Bugwandoss Nathjee Dessay and other witnesses. 

Dollerah, ilie Uh March 1802. 

The mark % of Chebrassama Jeejee. 
Bugwandoss Nathjee. 

MUNGAJEB EaNGAJEE. 

Dam Wallah Gerdiah. 
Jeejee Agersingjee. 

Churassama Bavajee Balliajee, who owns Vaghas consisting of eight 

large and small villages, came in and confirmed the proposals made by 

Gulabchund Taluckchund, and also the signature of Churassama Jeejee 
Agersingjee, 18th March 1802. 

The mark ® of Canoojbe Ballajbe. 
The mark @t of Bhinjee Kanjee. 

(True copies.) 

_(Sd.) J. Hallet, 

Assistant to the Secretary. 

We, the undersigned, do hereby promise that we shall not, on our arrival 
at Dhollerah, make any disturbance with anybody there, or touch anything 
whatever belonging to any inhabitants, so as to afi'ord cause for complaint"; 
we do also promise to give Mr. de Souza every assistance to try and examine 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— No. LXXX. 213 



every thing we have set forth in our proposals, and shall remain qniet and 
silent until the Honourable the Governor determines to accept or not our 
proposals. 



Cambay, the %%th February 1803. 



Appendix No. 16. — Teanslation of a Peewannah. 

Anund Rao Gaekwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor to the 
Girassias of Dundooka Choodasama and others, landholders under the said 
pergunnah. You have, in consequence of the oppressions from the Rajah of 
Bhownagur Limree and other powerful neighbours, made application to the 
Honourable the Governor of Bombay about four years ago, and offering him 
■ the villages requested his protection j and at your repeated solicitations upon 
the subject, the Governor instructed Mr. Miguel de Lima e' Souza, on account 
of the Honourable Company, to make the necessary enquiries respecting the 
following villages, which you have assigned over, viz., Roytulla, Dollerah, 
Bliimtulla, Bhangur, and Kuperally, and the district of eight villages, alto- 
gether about thirteen villages, and what further villages that shall be here- 
after put under the Company's protection. Thus you have represented to me 
in person; whereupon this cowl perwannah (a grant) is issued to you from 
the Sircar, that after cultivating your respective grounds in the above 
mentioned pergunnahs, you may enjoy a peaceable residence there. The 
Peishwa's Khundrug for the pergunnah Dundooka and the Sircar's usual 
jummabundy to be regularly paid, and you shall experience no oppression 
from the Sircar. The Honourable Company shall have the government of 
those villages, inhabit and cultivate them, and shall take upon themselves 
the management of the port, and hoist their flag; therefore you may rest 
assured, and observe the usual rules and customs in your conduct, for which 
you have this cowl from the Sircar. 

Bated Jesta Soodhe 2nd, 1858, or %nd of June 1802. 



No. LXXX. 

Ageeement with Anttnd Kao Guikwae in 1803, Sttpplementaet to the Teeatt of 

March and June 1802. 

Teanslation of a Lettee to the Honoiteable English East India Company from 
Anttnd Eao Guikwae Sena Khas Kheyl Shumshee Bahadooe, dated the 1st 
Shaval, or 25th January 1803, accompanying the Resident of Beodeea's letter of the 
14tli February. Received at Bombay the 20th ditto. 

After compliments. — Para. 1. It being agreed between us to subsidize 
your troops to the strength of two thousand in number, the following jaghire 
is ceded for that purpose, viz.— 



214 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— No. LXXX. 



From the pergunnali Neryad, the amount that had been Rupees 1,35,000 
reserved, after deducting one lakh of Rupees for 
the maintenance of my senior, Mulhar Rao Guik- 
war Himut Bahadoor, who having in the current 
year fled, in such case it ought to be credited from 
the next year to your account. 

Being the estimated revenue of the Neezapoor „ 1,30,000 

mehal, viz. — 

Net collection about ... Rupees 1,20,000 

Durbar charges, &c. ... „ 10,000 



Total Rupees 



1,30,000 



From the pergunnah Kurree that is situated in 25,000 

the vicinity of the pergunnah of Neezapoor. 

Say Rupees two lakhs eighty thousand worth 3,80,000 

in jaghire, duly ceded in the manner above 

recited, to commence from next year 1860, 

Sun Arba Myabine 1304. 

2. The amount you will have to disburse, on account of the respective 
pergunnahs, yearly gifts, charity, darakdars, and Durbar charges, shall be 
duly accountable to your Sircar by my Sircar, in seeing the same regularly 
paid, together with the produce of the enam villages. 

3. On your faithfully executing the Sircar's service, take the advantage 
of this assignment for the support of the troops. I call God to witness this. 

4. Soohoor "Sun Salas Myatein-wu-Ulf 1203. What can I write 
more? 



Anund Rao's 
Seal. 



Mortab. 



Statement of the Disteicts ceded to the Hokoueable Company by Anund Rao 

GUIKWAE. 



1. The pergunnah of Dholka 

2. Ditto Neryad 

3. Ditto Vijapoor, including the Rajah's Khangee, 

or the revenues allotted for his private ex- 
penses 

4. A Tuppa of Kurree, contiguous to Vijapoor. . . 



B AEODA, 

ISa Fehnm-y 1803. 



Total 
(Sd.) 



Rs. 

4,50,000 
1,75,000 



1,30,000 
35,000 

7,80,000 



A. Walker, 
Resident. 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— No. IiXXX. 215 



SuNNUD, datei 1st Shaval, or tlie 25th January 1803, and addressed to the Honotte- 
ABLK English Company by Antjnd Eao Guikwae Sena Ehas Khetl Shitm- 

SHEK BaHADOOE. 

Two thousand of your troops are in our service ; for their part main- 
tenance it is agreed to give jaghire lands as follows, viz : — 

In Neryadj deducting assignments, or money agreed to be transferred, to 
the amount of one lakh of Rupees (1,00,000), the remainder of the revenue 
of that district, being one and quarter lakh of Rupees (1,25,000), was allotted 
for the support of our relation, senior to us in years, Mulhar Rao Guikwar 
Himut Bahadoor, which, as the aforesaid fled in the same year, is given 
to you. 

The pergunnah of Vijapoor, valued at one lakh and thirty thousand Ru- 
pees (1,30,000), vis., the revenues one lakh and twenty thousand Rupees 
(1,20,000) and Durbar Kirch, with other articles, ten thousand Rupees 
(10,000). 

The Tuppa of the pergunnah of Kurree of twenty-five thousand Rupees 
(25,000) adjoining Vijapoor. 

These jaghires, yielding two lakhs and eighty thousand Rupees (2,80,000), 

are given to you from of the ensuing year 1860 (or Anno Domini 

1803-04). 

Out of these it will be necessary to pay the usual annual allowances, 
vershasun, dhurmadaos or charities, and darakdas daity and Durbar Kirch, 
the amount of which you may take credit for and I will discharge it. 

It is necessary that the troops be supported from the provision thus made, 
and that they serve us with respect and fidelity. 

Stamped with the seals of the State. 



SuNNtTD, dated the 10th Mohurrum (3rd May), and addressed to the HoNorEABLE English 
Company by His Highness Anitnd Kao Guikwae Sena Khas Ehetl Shum- 

SHEE BaHADOOE. 

Having maintained my honor and the good of the State, I have given to 
you in enam the fort and jaghire village of Keda or Kairaj take therefore and 
enjoy the fort and village aforesaid ; and as you have hitherto maintained a 
friendly intercourse with my Sircar, and thereby.done me honour, continue 
to do so. 



216 Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— No, IiXXX. 



I excuse you of the annual nuzzerana from thence. 

It is hoped that your Sirdars or office 
1 fully and respectfully towards us. 

Stamped with the seals of the State. 



It is hoped that your Sirdars or officers of rank here will always behave 
faithfully and respectfully towards us. 



SuNNTTD, dated the 11th Suifer (or the 2nd June 1803), and addressed to the Honoue- 
ABLE English Company by Anund Eao Gitikwae Sena Khas Khetl Shum- 

SHEE BaHADOOE. 

Two thousand of your troops are already provided for by Treaty ; besides 
them another thousand is now subsidized. In part payment thereof the 
following places are given from the beginning of the ensuing year, viz., the 
pergunnah of Mattur, valued at one lakh and thirty thousand Rupees (1,30,000); 
the pergunnah of Modha or Monde, one lakh and ten thousand Rupees 
(1,10,000) ; the customs of Kimkatodra, north of the Tappee, fifty thousand 
Rupees (50,000). These amounting to two lakhs and ninety thousand Ru- 
pees (3,90,000), I have given in jaghire for the expense of the additional 
thousand troops entertained by Treaty. 

Out of the funds of these possessions it is necessary that you continue to 
make the usual allowances annually of charities, darakdars, daity and 
assamidars, and durbar kirch, as heretofore. Should thereby the amount 
stipulated for the subsidiary force fall short, it shall be made up from 
the Sircar. 

Having taken and appropriated the fruits of the above places for the 
support of the additional thousand troops, it is necessary that your Sirdars 
perform the services of this Sircar in a respectful and faithful manner. 

Stamped with the seals of the State. 



Teanslation of a Sunnttd from Annud Eao Guikwae Sena Khas Khetl Shttmshee 
Bahadooe, to Bhowant Puesaud and Vanbt Puesattd of Kimkatodea, dated Moon 
Suffer, or 2nd June 1803. 

The management of the Syer of Kimkatodra Taptee Wooter Teer, of- on 
the north side of the Taptee river, is taken from you and given to the Honour- 
able Company ,on account of the subsidy engagement, therefore you will 
deliver over the charge of the said Syer, from the first Karticksood Arabah 
Meyatane (or from the 16th October 1803), to the Honourable Company. 

(Sd.) A. Walkee, 
Besident, 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— No. LXXXI. 217 

Tbanslation of a Sttnnud from Antjnd Kao Qtjikwar Sena Khas Khetl Shumshee 
Bahadook to all the Jemadaes of Kimkatodea Taptee Wootee Teeb, or on the 
north side of the Taptee River, .dated the 11th Suffer 1869, or 2nd June 1803. 

I have discharged Bhowiny Pursaud and Vaney Pursaud from the 
management of the Syev Kimkatodra Taptee Wooter Teer and given it to the 
Honourable Company, on accovint of the additional subsidy, wherefore you 
will obey this ordei", and deliver over the charge of the said Syer, from the 
first day of Mergsaul, to the Honourable Company. 



No. LXXXI. 



Definitive Teeatt of Geneeal Defensive Alliance hetween the Honoueable English 
East India Company on the one part, and the Maharajah Anund Rao Guikwae Sena 
Khas Khetl Shitmshee Bahadooe and his children, heirs and successors, on the 
other, settled by Major Alexander Walker, Resident at Baroda, having full 
powers from the Government of Bombay, which is, in like manner, authorized by His 
Excellency the Most Noble Richard Marquis Wellesley, Knight of the Most 
Illustrious Ordbe of St. Patrick, one of His Britannic Majesty's Most 
Honoueable Privy Council, Governor General in Council, appointed by the 
Honoueable the Couet of Directors to direct and control all their affairs in the 
East Indies. ♦ 

Whereas various agreements have been concluded between the Honour- 
able Company on the one part, and Auuad Rao Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl 
Shumsher Bahadoor on the other, all tending to improve and increase the 
friendship and alliance between the contracting parties, viz., a convention 
dated at Cambay, the 1 5th March 1803, settled by the Governor of Bombay on 
the part of the Honourable Company, and by Raojee Appajee, Dewan on the 
part of Anund Rao Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor; an agree- 
ment, dated at Cambay, the 6th June 1803, settled by the Governor of 
Bombay on the part of the Honourable Company, and by Raojee Appajee, 
Dewan, on the part of Anund Rao Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher 
Bahadoor; and an agreement made by Anund Rao Guikwar Sena Khas 
Khayl Shumsher Bahadoor with Major Alexander Walker, Resident at Baroda, 
on the part of the Honourable Company, dated at Baroda, the 29th July 1802 ; 
and whereas it is desirable to consolidate the stipulations of all these separate 
engagements with one definitive Treaty, and further to improve the state of 
alliance of the contracting parties, in like manner as has been applied for by 
the aforesaid Raojee Appajee, in his letter of the fOth of Suffer (or 12th June 
1803), desiring that the present engagement between the Honourable Com- 
pany and the Guikwar State may be drawn up in terms consonant to those 
employed in the Treaty of Bassein between the Honourable Company and his 
Highness the Peishwa, the said Company and the Maharajah Anund Rao 
IV 28 



218 Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— No. LXXXI. 



Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumshev Bahadoor do hereby accordingly agree 
to the following Articles framed for that purpose :— 

Aeticle 1. , 
All the stipulations of the engagements heretofore made between the 
contracting parties, and above recited, viz., on the 15th of March, 6th June, 
and 29th July 1802, are hereby confirmed, and are to bind the contracting 
parties, their heirs and successors, for ever. 

Aetigle 2. 

The friends and enemies of either party shall be the friends and enemies 
of both ; and if any power shall commit any act of unprovoked hostility or 
aggression against either of the contracting parties, or against their respec- 
tive dependants or allies, and after due representation shall refuse to enter 
into amicable explanation, or shall deny the just satisfaction which the con- 
tracting parties shall have required, the contracting parties will proceed to 
prosecute such further measures as the case shall appear to demand. 

Article 3. 

Whereas, in conformity to the agreements heretofore made between the 
Honourable Company and the Maharajah Anund Rao Guikwar Sena Khas 
Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor, a subsidiary force of two ^thousand men was 
subsidized, and inclusive of the half augmentation of the subsidiary force 
first fixed upon, the Maharajah Anund Rao Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl 
Shumsher Bahadoor agrees to receive, and the Honourable Company to fur- 
nish, a permanent subsidiary force of not less than three thousand regular 
native infantry, with one company of European artillery, and their proportion, 
viz., two companies of gun-lascars, with the necessary ordnance, and warlike 
stores and ammunition, which force is to be stationed in the territories of the 
said Anund Rao Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor. 

Article 4. 

The subsidiary force will at all times be ready to execute services of 
importance, such as the protection of the person of Anund Rao Guikwar 
Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor, his heirs and successors, the over- 
awing and chastisement of rebels and exciters of disturbance in his territories, 
and the due correction of his subjects or dependants who may withhold the 
payment of the Sircar's just claims ; but it is not to be employed on trifling 
occasions, nor, like sebundy, to be stationed in the country to collect the 
revenue. One battalion of these forces, however, or such a proportion of 
them as the performance of the foregoing services may require, will proceed 
to Kattywar when there may be a real necessity for it; but the English 
Government, whose care and attention to all the interests of the Guikwar 
State cannot be doubted, must remain the judge of this necessity. 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— Wo. LXXXI. 219 



Article 5. 

In order to provide the regular payment of the whole expense of this 
subsidiary force, Anund Rao Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor 
has ceded, by the agreements aforesaid, viz., dated the 15th March, 6th June, 
and 29th July 1802, and 2nd June 1803, districts and other funds, of which 
a-Schedule (A) is annexed to this Treaty, of the yearly net value of Rupees 
11,70,000. This cession is confinned by this Treaty, and Anund Rao Gaekwar 
Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor hereby cedes the districts of which 
the Schedule is annexed, with all the rights of sovereignty thereof, and all 
the forts which they contain, in perpetuity, to the Honourable Company. 

Akticle 6, 

The districts of Chowrassee, Chiekly, Surat, Chouth, and Kaira have 
been ceded to the Honouirable Company by Anund Rao Guikwar Sena Khas 
Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor as a proof of his friendship, and as a testimony of 
his sense of the benefit which he has reeeived from his alliance with the 
Honourable Company's gO'vernment. The cession of these districts is con- 
firmed by this Treaty, and Anund Rao, Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher 
Bahadoor hereby cedes the districts above mentioned, with all the rights 
belonging to the sovereignty thereof, and all the forts which they contain, 
in perpetuity, to the Honourable Company. 

Akticle 7. 

Whereas the Honourable Company have, at different periods, assisted 
Anund Rao Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor, both from their 
own funds and those of bankers, with advances of money, a particular account 
of which, as well as of the funds assigned for the payment of the same,- is 
contained in the Schedule annexed, marked B, it is hereby agreed that the frail 
amount of the russud of the districts therein named, according to the provi- 
sions in the eighth Article of the agreement of the 29th July, shall be collect- 
ed on account of the Honourable Company, and the persons therein referred to, 
until these debts and the interest due upon them shall be fully paid"; and for 
the past or any future advances which the Company's government may make 
to that of the Guikwarj mehals shall be assigned as their security. 

Article 8. 

Grain, and all other articles of consumption and provisions, all sorts of 
maCterials for wearing apparel, together with the necessary numbers of cattle, 
horses, and camels required for the use of thfe subsidiary force, shall be 
exempted from duties in the territories of Anund Rao Guikwar Sena Khas 
Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor, and the commanding oflScer and the ofiicers of the 
subsidiary force shall be treated in all respects in a manner suitable to the 
importance of the trust placed in them and the dignity of the British Govern- 
ment. In like manner shall the officers of the Guikwar government meet 
with similar consideration and respect from the Honourable Company. In 



220 Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar -No.XXXXI. 



consideration, also, of the good-will and friendship which has so long happily 
subsisted between the Honourable Company and the Guikwar government, 
such goods and articles as may be bond fide required for the private use or 
consumption of that family, or of the ministers, shall be allowed to be pur- 
chased at Surat and Bombay, and to be sent from thence free of duties, on 
being accompanied by a passport from the Resident at Baroda. 

As the Deccan is the native country of the Mahrattas, who inhabit or 
serve in Guzerat, such of this nation as may be in the Guikwar service shall 
be allowed to pass and repass freely, with their familieSj through the Honour- 
able Company^s territories. 

It is expressly understood that the admission of this Article is not to 
sanction, or in any shape to authorize, the transit of merchandize or of pro- 
hibited goods. 

Article 9. 
The Maharajah Anund Rao Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher Ba^ 
hadoor hereby engages that he will not entertain in his service any European 
or American, or any native of India, subject of the Honourable Company, 
without the consent of the British Government j neither will the Company's 
government entertain in their service any of the Guikwar servants, dependants, 
or slaves, contrary to the inclination of that State. 

Article 10. 

Inasmuch as by the present Treaty the contracting parties are bound in 
an alliance for .mutual defence and protection, Anund Rao Guikwar Sena 
Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor engages never to commit any act of hostility 
or aggression against any power whatever ; and in the event of difference 
arising, whatever adjustment the Honourable Company's government, weigh- 
ing matters in the scale of truth and justice, may, in communication with 
the Guikwar Sircar, determine, shall meet with fall approbation and acquies- 
cence. 

Artici45 11. 

"Whereas there are certain unfinished transactions between His Highness 
the Peishwa and Anund Rao Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor, 
and there exist certain papers of accounts which are unadjusted, Anund Rao 
Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor doth hereby agree that the 
Honourable Company's government shall examine into and finally adjust the 
said transactions, papers, and accounts, and the demands resulting therefrom ; 
and Anund Rao Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor binds 
himself, his heirs and successors, to abide by such adjustment as the British 
Government shall accordingly determine. Further, in respect to these unset- 
tled pecuniary affairs existing with the governments of His Highness the 
Peishwa and the Guikwar, it behoves the latter to repose a similar faith in 
the British Government as the Peishwa, who has agreed to abide by the 
adjustment of these concerns, 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— No. LXXXI. 221 



This settlement shall be efBected by the Honourable Company after taking 
into mature consideration the impoverished state of the Guikvvar finances; 
and the latter government entertain a full conviction that no oppressive 
demand will be enforced under the Company's mediation. 

AUTICLB 13. 
If, notwithstanding the defensive nature of the agreement between the 
contracting parties, and their desire to cultivate and improve the relations of 
peace with all the powers of India, war should unfortunately break out, it is 
agreed that with the reserve of a battalion of native infantry to remain near 
the person of the Maharajah Anund Rao Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher 
Bahadoor, of such proportion as may appear necessary for the security of 
Guzeratj the residue of the subsidiary force, with their ordnance and public 
stores and ammunition, shall be immediately put in motion for the purpose 
of opposing the enemy. 

The troops of the Maharajah Anund Rao Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl 
Shumsher Bahadoor shall accompany the British troops to the boundaries of 
Guzerat in order to terminate the war. Should, however, any great exigency 
arise, the circumstances shall be mutually considered, and the best means in 
the power of the contracting parties pursued to terminate the same. 

Aeticli 13. 

As the enemies of both States are the same, those who are in opposition 
to the Guikwar government, or in rebellion to it, can never, while acting in this 
manner, be admitted to the friendship of the Honourable Company; but 
should Canojee Guikwar, who comes under this description, repent and submit 
himself, it will be advisable to allow him a suitable pension, on which he 
may subsist and reside at Bombay, or at any other place which may be eijually 
safe and convenient. 

Neither Canojee Guikwar nor Mulhar Rao Guikwar will have any other 
claim on the Guikwar government than the pension which has been assigned 
to the latter, and that which may ev«ntually be assigned to the former. 

Article 14f. 
When the subsidiary troops will take the field, the Maharajah Anund 
Eao Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor will supply such quan- 
tities of grain and benjarries to attend the army as the resources of his 
country may afford, the British Government defraying the expense thereof. 

Article 15. 
If disturbances shall at any time break out in the Honourable Company^'s 
territories or districts bordering on those of the Maharajah Anund Rao 
Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor, the said Maharajah Anund 
Rao Guikwar shall consent to the employment of such a proportion of the 
subsidiary force as may be requisite to quell the same ; and if at any time 



222 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— No. IiXXXI. 



disturbances shall break out in any part of the Maharajah Anund Rag 
Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor's territories, to which it 
might be inconvenient to detach a proportion of the subsidiary force, the 
British Government will, in like manner, at the requisition of the said Maha- 
rajah Anund Rao Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor, detach 
such a proportion of the troops of the Company as may be most conveniently 
situated to assist in quelling the said disturbances in the Maharajah Anuud 
Rao Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor's territories. 

Aeticle 16. 

In future the subjects of each State, who may take refuge with either, 
shall be delivered up, if the State from which such parties shall have fled 
appear to have any demand of debt or any just claim against him or them ; 
but as a free intercourse between the countries under the two governments is 
also intended, frivolous claims against parties resorting from their own to the 
other's jurisdiction are not to be preferred, and in all serious cases cordiality 
will be shown. 

Article 17. 

The contracting parties hereby bind themselves to take into consideration 
hereafter the commercial relations between their respective territories, and to 
settle them in due time by a commercial treaty. 



Bone at Baroda, the %\st April A.B. 1805. 



SCHEDULE A. 

A Statement of the funds assigned and districts ceded, in perpetual sovereignty, 
to the Honourable Company by Maharajah Anund Rao Guikwar Sena Khas 
Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor, in order to provide for the regular payment of 
the subsidiary troops. 

Thepergunnah of Dholka ... 

Ditto Neryad ... 

Ditto Vijapoor 

Ditto Mattur ... 

Ditto Monde ... 

The Tuppa of Kurree 
The Kimkatodra 
Warrat on Katty war 



Baroda, the l\d April A.B, 1805. 



Rs. 


Ss. 


... 4,50,000 




... 1,75,000 




... 1,30,000 




... 1,30,000 




... 1,10,000 




25,000 




50,000 




... 1,00,000 






11,70,000 




Total Rupees 


11,70,000 


(Sd.) A. 


Walkeii, 




Resident 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— No. LXXXI. 223 



SCHEDULE B. 

A Statement of t/ie advances made hy the Honourable Company and various 
Bankers to Maharajah Anund Bao Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher 
Bahadoor, comprising an account of the funds assigned for their repayment 
according to the provisions made in the Mh Article of the Agreement of the 
IWi of July A.B. 1802. 

Advanced on account of the first loan for the reduction of the Arab Sehundy — 

JBy the Sonourahle Company. 

December 21st, 1802, as per account settled hy the Ac- 
countant General at the Presidency, under this date Rs. 10,77,447 3 96 

, By the Shroffs. 

Hurry Bucktee ] 

Mungul Sukeedass ) 23,25,447 3 9G 

On account of the second loan for the discharge of the Arab Sebundy. 

Hy the Honourable Company. 

January 31st, 1803, as per account and bond of this date 8,89,683 16 

Sy the Shroffs. 

Samuldass Becherdass ... ... 4,96,143 2 50 

Mungul Sukeedass ... ... 4,27,458 







18,13,284 


2 66 




Es. 

.Funds assigned for the repayment of the foregoing. 

The pergunnah of Baroda ... lis. 6,00,000 

Ditto Petlaud ... „ 3,00,000 

Talooka Ahmedabad ... ... „ 1,00,000 

Ditto Kerul ... ... „ 25,000 

The Sayer Kotee of the foi-t of Baroda „ 75,000 
Pergunnah of Kurree... ... „ 1,50,000 

Ditto Eaj Pimpla ... „ 45,000 




41,38,732 


2 63 


1st. 
2nd. 
3rd. 
4th. 
5th. 
6th. 
7th. 


12,95,000 











Baroda, the %\st April A.B. 1805. 

Ratified by the Governor-General in Councii on 18th March 1806. 



Amended Aeticle of the Teeatt concluded between the Honoiteable Company and 
Rajah Anund Rao Guikwar on the 21st April 1805. 

Akticle 13.- 

As the enemies o£ both States are the same, those who are in opposition 
to the Guikwar government, or in rebellion to it, can never, while acting in 
this manner, be admitted to the friendship of the Honourable Company ; but 
should Canojee Guikwar, who comes under this description, repent and submit 
himself, it will be advisable to allow him a suitable pension, on which he may 



224 Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— TTo. LXXXII. 



subsist, and reside at Bombay, or at any other place which may be equally safe 
and convenient. 

Neither Canoiee Guikwar nor Mulhar Rao Guikwar will have any other 
claim on the Guikwar government than the pension which has been assigned 
to the latter, and that which may eventually be assigned to the former; nor 
will any future measure be taken with respect to those persons, or to any of 
the several dispersed members of the Guikwar family, otherwise than in full 
communication with, and by the free consent of Anund Rao, the reigning 
prince and the acknowledged legal head of the family. 

Ratified by the Guikwar on the 10th September 1806. 



No. LXXXII. 



Seal of 

Anund Rao 

Guikwar. 



MEMORANDUM. 

Whereas mehals, &c., yielding a revenue of eleven lakhs and seventy 
thousand Rupees have been assigned in jaidad* for the Regiment of the 
Honourable English Company Bahadoor, and whereas the actual realizations 
from the mehals, as shown in the Memorandum received from the Company, 
and the amount of the doomalla,t enamee, and other villages fall short of the 
(above) amount, there is a balance due of Rupees 1,76,168-15. Soorsun 
Tissa-wu Myatein-wu-Ulf. 

The following are the particulars of the amounts agreed to be assigned 
to meet this balance : — 

The amounts assigned from the beginning of Sunnut Saman- Es. a. p. 
wu-Myatein, or Sumbut 1864, according to the actual 
realizations, as per Memorandum received from the Com- 
pany, vie., Ghasdana (cess imposed in lieu of forage), 
from talooka Bhownuggur ... ... ... M,500 

Vurauth (order upon' the public revenue) upon pergunnah 
Neryad, wliich was formerly given for the payment of 
the Putuk (body of horse) of Silledar Meer Kamaled- 
deen Hossein Khan, and whicli having become an un- 
appropriated item in consequence of the abolition of the 
Surinjam of the said person ... ... ... 50,000 

The actual realization of the throe villages of Solera, Sadra, 
and Muktu], which were stated in the Memorandura 
dated the 11th Rubee-ool-Akhir Sunnut Saman, to yield 
a revenue of Rupees 2,500, and which have yielded 
Rupees 1,050 less, as per Memorandum received from 
the Company _ ... ... ... ... 1,450 

Mouza Hyderabad, situated in the pergunnah of Modhen ... 1,000 



Carried over ... Rs. ...1,26,950 



* An assignment in land for the maintenance of an establishment of troops, 
t Alienated villages. 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— Tfo. LXXXII- 



225 



Brought forward ... Es. 

The following dooinalla (alienated) villages which were held 
by different persons have been resumed and assigned to 
meet the balance in question, mz. : — 

The villages of pergunuah Dhuvalka, viz . : — 

Mouza Bhayet held by Guyabaee 



1,26,950 



Guikwar 


4,500 








Mouza Bidej held by Capabaee 
Guikwar 


3,150 








The two villages held by Bacha 
Jemadar, viz. : — 








Ss. a. p. 








Mouza TraJ ... 6,000 
Mouza Kurak ... 2,150 


8,150 










The villages of pcrgunnah Mod- 
hen, viz. : — 








Mouza Ghora held by Silledar 
Bhavoo Kallay 


900 









The villages of pergunnah Mat- 
tur, viz. : — 

The four villages of Modhow, 
Jumma, Kutta, &c., held 
by Shreeputrao Narrayen 
employed in the Paza Estab- 
lishment ... ... 

Mouza Jijka and Mouza Goora- 
doo held by the Nawab of 
Cambay 



15,800 



900 



8,100 



1,150 



The villages of pergunnah Vija- 








poor, VIZ. : — 










Mouza Kuda held by 


Kumabaee 


4,401 








Mouza Oodaee held 


by Silledar 








Sheoram Bulwmit 


... 


2,301 









9,250 

• 25,950 



6,702 
■ 6,702 

The following amounts assigned from the beginning of Sunnut Tissa-wu- 

Myatein or Sumbut 1865, viz. ; — 
Eungar Ghaut ... ... ... ... 3,750 

Domalla (alienated) villages, viz. : — 

The balance of the revenue of Mouza Setra, 
Pergunnah Mattur, held by Soobhanjee Poll 
Pazedar, after deducting Enpees 550 on 
account of the jaidad assigned for the fort 
ofKaira ... ,-.. ... 950 

The villages of pergunnah Modhew, viz. : — 

The two villages held by Soobhanjee Poll on 
account of the Paza in his charge, viz. ; — 

Mouza Gogruj ... 2,500 
Mouza Summadren 1,500 

4,000 

Carried over ... Ks. 4,000 950 .0 3,750 

IV 



1,59,602 



1,59,602 
29 



226 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— No. LXXXIII. 



Brought forward ,.. Es. 4,000 950 

Mouza Bhoomal, held by Essoo- 

baee Guikwar ... ... 4,200 

Mouza Piping, held by Gugra- 
baee Guikwar ... ... 3,666 15 

11,866 15 



3,750 ,1,59,602 



12,816 15 



Total 



16,566 15 
1,76,168 15 



In this manner it is agreed to assign from this year on account of jaidad 
the amount of one lakh seventy-six thousand one hundred and sixty-eight 
Rupees and fifteen annas, the particulars of which have been stated above. 

Be this known. 

Dated 11 th Jemmadee-ool-awul, or \%th July 1808. 



It is decided upon. 



Mortub 
Sood. 



Seal of 

Anund Rao 

Guikwar, 



Teanslation of an Oedeb from Siecae Rajebheeb Anund Rao GtriE;wAE Sena Khas 
Kheyl Shttmshee Bahadooe, to Mi7NCHUE,rEB Khooeshedjee Desabe, Com- 

AVISHDAE of RUNGUE GhATJT, S0OE6UN, TlBSA-WU MtATEIN-WU-UlF. 

As the above mentioned ghaut has this j'ear been assigned on account 
of the jaidad for the regiments of the Honourable English Company Baha- 
door, you are to make it over (to the Honourable Company) and take a 
receipt. Be this known to you. 

Bated Wth July 1808. 



It is ordered. 



Mortub 
Sood. 



No. LXXXIII. 

SopptEMENT to the Definitive Teeatt with the Guikwae. 

A definitive Treaty, consisting of seventeen Articles, in consolidation of 
all preceding engagements with the Guikwar State, was concluded at Baroda 
between the Honourable English East India Company and the Maharajah 
Anund Rao Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor, his heirs and 
successors. The following Articles of engagement are now agreed on and 
settled as supplemental to the said Treaty by His Highness Putteh Sing- Rao 
Guikwar, on the part of the said Maharajah Anund Rao Guikwar, and 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar-No. LXXXIII. 227 



Captain James Rivett Carnae, on the part of the said Honourable Company, 
under full powers and authority granted to them respectively for that 
purpose ; — ' 

Article 1, 

Whereas it has appeared highly expedient, in order efPectually to provide 
for the maintenance of the interests of the alliance in Guzerat, and for the 
protection of the Guikwar dominions, that the additional means to those pro- 
vided by the 3rd Article of the definitive Treaty, dated 21st April 1806, cor- 
responding with aOth Mohurrum, 1220 Hegira, or Sumwut 1861, in the 
month of Chytre, should be furnished by the Honourable Company, the 
Maharajah Anund Rao Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor 
agrees to receive, and tlie Honourable East India Company to furnish, an 
increase to the present subsidiary force of one battalion of native infantry, of 
not less than one thousand men, with two regiments of native cavalry, of the 
same strength and complement as the cavalry regiment belonging to the 
Poona subsidiary force ; and the Maharajah further engages to the admission 
and residence in the Guikwar territories of any number of British troops in 
excess to the subsidiary force. His Highness being liable to no additional 
charge on this account. 

Aeticlb 2. 

The subsidiary force will at all times be ready to execute the services ex- 
pressed in the fourth Article of the Treaty dated 21st April 1805, correspond- 
ing with 20th Mohurrum 1220 Hegira, or Sumwut 1861, in the month of 
Chytre; and in the event of war breaking out with any of the powers of 
India, it is agreed, conformably to the 12th Article of the aforesaid Treaty, 
that with the reserve of a battalion of native infantry to remain near the per- 
son of the Maharajah Anund Rao Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher 
Bahadoor, or such a proportion as may appear necessary for the security of 
Guzerat, the residue of the subsidiary force now composed of four battalions 
of native infantry of one thousand men each battalion, or five battalions of 
eight hundred men, and two regiments of native cavalry, with one company 
of European artillery, with their proportion of gun-lascars with the necessary 
ordnance and warlike stores and ammunition, shall be immediately put in 
motion for the purpose of opposing the enemy. 

Article 3. 
For the regular payment of the expense of the augmentation of the sub- 
sidiary force, as stipulated in the 1st Article of this engagement. His High- 
ness Anund Rao Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor hereby 
assigns and cedes in perpetuity to the Honourable English East India Com- 
pany all the rights which His Highness has obtained from the perpetual farm 
of the Peishwa's territories, subject to the city of Ahmedabad, as secured by 
the 15th Article of the Treaty of Poona, dated 13th June a.d. 1817, corre- 
sponding with the 27th Rujjub 1232 Hegira, or Sumwut 1873, in the month 
of Jeyst, it being distinctly understood that the engagements to His Highness 
the Peishwa contingent on the farm of the said territories are to be performed 



228 Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— No, LXXXIII. 



by the Honourable Company, and no claim of any description on such account 
is at any time to be preferred against the Guikwar government. The terri- 
tories comprehended in the farm of Ahmedabad are detailed in the Schedule 
B.J annexed to this Treaty. 

Aeticle 4. 

Inasmuch . as the pergunnahs belonging to the Honourable Company of 
Dubhoy, Bahadurpore, and Sowlee, from their proximity to Baroda, are 
peculiarly valuable to the Guikwar government it is accordingly agreed that 
these districts be made over in perpetuity and full sovereignty to His Highness 
Anund Rao Guikwar, his heirs and successors, and that His Highness assigns 
for ever in full sovereignty his share of the city of Ahmedabad with the 
exception hereafter specified, and a proportion of the Guikwar share of the 
Petlaud district contiguous to the Company's territories, in perpetuity, 
and with all the rights of sovereignty thereof, in exchange for the aforesaid 
districts belonging to the Honourable Company, the territories of each party 
being received at the revenues specified in the annexed Schedule C. His 
Highness Anund Rao Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor having 
retained possession of his fort or havellie in the city of Ahmedabad, and its 
dependent possessions known under the denomination of the Duscoorae, it is 
further agreed and determined that His Highness only maintains a force in 
the said havellie sufficient for the purposes of revenue collections and police, 
and that His Highness' servants in the havellie will conduct themselves with 
strict regard to the rules and regulations within the city of Ahmedabad of the 
Company's government. The Honourable Company, on the other hand, here- 
by promises that every proper accommodation shall be afforded from the 
public authorities in the city to the servants of His Highness Anund Rao 
Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor residing at or stationed in 
the said havellie, as well as that all persons or troops subject to His Highness' 
authority at the havellie of Ahmedabad, or the Guikwar Duscoorae, shall 
not be amenable to the laws of the British Government, but made subject 
to His Highness' authority, who hereby agrees to afford satisfaction to the 
local authorities of the Honourable Company of adequate punishment accord- 
ing to his laws for any misconduct of his servants and dependants within the 
city of Ahmedabad. In consideration of the good-will and friendship which 
has so long happily subsisted between the Honourable Company and the Guik- 
war government, such goods and articles as may be bond fide required for 
private use or consumption of that family or of* the ministers shall be allowed 
to be purchased at Ahmedabad, %nd to be sent from thence free of duties on 
being accompanied bj a passport from the Resident at Baroda. 

Aeticle 5. 
Whereas, by the exchange of districts stipulated in the foregoing Article, 
great advantages are derived in territorial extent and population from the 
possession of Dubhoy, Bahadurpore, and Sowlee, His Highness Anund Rao 
Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor, adverting to this benefit, 
agrees to assign territory in the vicinity of Surat, or from his portion of the 
pergunnah of Petlaud, in exchange for the MoguUae claims of the Honourable 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— Wo. LXXXIII. 229 



Company, in virtue of its possession of the castle of Surat, on the districts 
belonging to the Guikwar in the province termed Surat Attaveessee. 

Article 6. 

By Schedule A. to the definitive Treaty Maharajah Anund, Rao Guikwar 
Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor ceded in perpetuity to the Honourable 
Companyj for the expenses of a subsidiary force, certain districts with all the 
rights of sovereignty and produce thereof "and all the forts they contain, from 
which districts the pergunnah of Vijapore has been, exchanged for other 
districts of equal produce, as particularized in a separate list annexed thereto, 
conformably to which Maharajah Anund Rao Guikwar Sena Khafr Kheyl 
Shumsher Bahadoor engages to transfer in perpetuity all rights of sovereignty 
over those districts and all the forts which they contain to the Honourable 
Company, and the Honourable Company agrees to restore for ever the whole 
right of sovereignty over the district of Vijapore and the forts which it 
contains to Maharajab Anund Rao Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher 
Bahadoor ; and whereas, in consideration of the Maharajah having consented 
to the exchange of the district of Vijapore, the Honourable Company do 
promise that they will not apply in future to the Maharajah, his children, 
heirs or successors, for the exchange of any of tlie districts ceded by the 
definitive Treaty bearing date the 2ist day of April 1805, corresponding 
with 20th Mohurrum, 1220 Hegira, or Sumwnt 1861, in the month of 
Chytre, or of the other districts now exchanged for Vijapore, or for the 
exchange of any territory whatever. 

Aeticle 7. 

Maharajah Anund Rao Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor 
having represented to the Honourable Company that on the island of Bate 
and in the province of Okamundel there are two places of Hindoo religious 
worship and devotion, and that the Guikwar government should be put in 
possession of these places, and the Honourable English East India Company 
lieing disposed to comply with the earnest desire of the Maharajah, the pro- 
vince of Okamundel and the island of Bate, with all the rights of sove- 
reignty thereof and all the forts they contain, are accordingly given to the 
Maharajah Anund Rao Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor, his 
heirs or successors, in perpetuity, and the Maharajah Sena Khas Kheyl Shum- 
sher Bahadoor promises to allow in perpetuity a building on the island of 
Bate to the Honourable Company for depositing stores, free of any claim 
for tax or otherwise, and consents that all vessels, boats, servants, subjects, 
&c., belonging to the Honourable Company, as well as merchant vessels from 
the Honourable Company's ports, as may frequent any of the ports and 
places in the provinces of the Guikwar government, shall pass and repass 
without hinderance; and the Honourable Company, on the other hand, 
agrees that all vessels, boats, servants, subjects, &c., belonging to the 
Guikwar government, as well as merchant vessels from the ports of the 
Guikwar government, as may frequent the Honourable Company's ports, shall 
also pass and repass without hinderance. The Maharaja moreover promises 



230 Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— No. LXXXIII. 



that the person who may reside in charge of the Honourable Company's 
stores shall meet with «o molestation whatever, and be treated with all due 
consideration. 

Aeticle 8. 

Whereas, by the second clause of the 13th Article of the Treaty of the 
21st April 1805j corresponding with 20th Mohurrum, 1220 Hegira, or Sum- 
wut 1861, in the month of Chytre, the Maharaja Anund Rao Guikwar Sena 
Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor has stipulated to furnish his troops to act 
with the British forces on any great exigency. His Highness hereby further 
engages, in ease of war, to bring forward the whole of his military resources 
for the prosecution of the war. The Honourable Company, on the other 
hand, agrees to take into consideration and determine the pretensions of the 
Guikwar government to benefit by any future partition of territory acquired 
in foreign wars. The Guikwar government also binds itself to maintain and 
hold at the disposal of the Honourable Company, to act with the subsidiary 
force wherever it may be employed, and to be subject to the general command 
of the ofEcer commanding the British troops, a body of 3,000 effective cavalry 
to be supported exclusively at the expense of His Highness the Guikwar, and 
that His Highness will conform to the advice and suggestions of the British 
Government relative to the formation and equipment of the contingent of 
horse, its regular monthly payment, the condition of its arms and accoutre- 
ments according to the customs of the Guikwar government, ; its muster to 
be personally taken by the head of the Guikwar Government, and at the time 
of payment on the day of the new moon in every month, the Guikwar gov- 
ernment and the Resident at Baroda will also take the muster thereof, or if the 
force is dispatched from Baroda on service, the ofSeer who will be nominated 
by the Guikwar Sircar to its command and the officer who proceeds in 
command of the Honourable Company's troops shall jointly take the muster, 
agreeably to the aforesaid agreement made in that respect. 



Article 9. 

The contracting parties being actuated by a sincere desire to promote and 
maintain the general tranquillity and order of their respective possessions, and 
adverting to the intermixture of some of the territories belonging to the 
Honourable Company and the Maharaja Anund Rao Guikwar Sena Khas 
Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor, it is therefore hereby agreed that offenders taking 
refuge in the jurisdiction of either party shall be surrendered on demand 
without delay or hesitation. 

AUTICLE 10. 

All Articles of the definitive Treaty at Baroda, dated 21st April 1805, 
corresponding with 20th Mohurrum, 1220 Hegira, or Sumwut 1861, in the 
month of Chytre, not contrary to the present engagement, are hereby 
confirmed. 

Article 11. 

The Supplemental Treaty, consisting of eleven Articles, being this day, 
6th November 1817, corresponding with 25th Jilhej, 1232 Hegira, or Sumwut 



Baroda Agency— The C^aekwar— No. LXXXIII. 



231 



1873, in the month of "Aswein, settled and concluded at Baroda, to be binding 
and permanent when ratified by His Excellency the Most Noble the Marquis 
of Hastings, K.G., Governor-General in Council. 

Done at Baroda, Qth November A.B. 1817. 



Witness : 



(Sd.) J. B. Caenac, 

Resident. 



L. s. 



Memo. — This Treaty was ratified by His Excellency the Governor-General, 
in camp, at Mussowley, this 12th day of March one thousand eight hundred 



and eighteen. 



(Sd.) J. Adam, 
Secretary to the Governor-General, 



SCHEDULE B* 

Of the funds assigned and territories ceded in perpetual sovereignty hy His 
Highness Anund Rao Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor to 
the Honourable English Bast India Company, under the Supplemental 
Treaty dated 6fh November 1817, corresponding with 2bth Jilhej 1233, or 
Sumwut 1873, in the month of Aswein, in order to provide for the regu- 
lar payment of the additional troops subsidized. 

Districts composing the perpetual farm of Ahmedabad ceded and accepted 
at net Rupees 12,61,969-2-50, subject to all the conditions of the farm. 

Half of the city of Ahmedabad ; Peishwa Duscoorae -^ 
pergunnah Beerumgaum 

Perauntej and Peiehwa's share in Hursoolee and 
Morassa Punch Mehals as follows : — 

Mahmoodabad 

Aleena, or otherwise Thamha 

Tasra 

Untrolee 

Balesenore and Veerpore 
Half of the town and pergunnah of Petlaud 

(Sd.) J. R. Caknac, 

Resident at Baroda. 



Net Rupees 
12,61,969-2-50 




* For Schedule A., referred to in Article 6, see page 222. 



232 



Baroda Agency— Tbe Gaekwar— No. LXXXIII. 



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Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— Wo. LXXXIV. 



233 



Additionai, Aeticle to the Stjpplementai Tbeatt, on a separate negotiation concluded 
with His Highness Stajeb Rao Guikwae, the successor of His late HiaHKESs 
FuTTEH Sing. , 

It having been stipulated in the 4th Article of the foregoing Treaty that 
in exchange for the districts of Dubhoy, Bahadurpore, and Sowlee, one-half 
of the city of Ahmedabad, and a part of the villages in the Guikwar share of 
the pergunnah of Petlaudj be ceded to the Honourable Company, the contract- 
ing parties, on further consideration, have substituted the following arrange- 
ment, including therein a cession on account of the Mogullae dues on the dis- 
tricts belonging to the Guikwar in the Surat Attaveessee, as agreed for in the 
5th Article of the same Treaty, namely, the district known as the Guikwar's 
Duscoorae (inclusive of doomala and enam assignments), with the havellie in 
the city and the cusba of Mota and the pergunnah of Turkesur in the Surat 
Attaveessee, as specified in the annexed detailed account of territories and 
rights so exchanged. 

It being also mutually desirable for the interest and convenience of both 
governments, and to promote more effectually the consolidation of their power 
and authority, that the rights over the cusba town of Petlaud shall be trans- 
ferred to one or either of the contracting parties, His Highness Anund Rao 
Guikwar, &e., has agreed to cede in exchange for the Company's rights in the 
cusba of Petlaud only his rights in the Cusba town of Omrul. 



(Sd.) J. R. Caenac, 

Resident at Baroda. 



L. s. 



The 

Company's 

Seal. 



(Sd.) Hastings. 
„ g. dowdeswell. 

„ Jambs Stuaet, 



Ratified by the Governor General in Council this 28th day of Novem- 
^ber 1818. 

(Sd,) J. Adam, 
Chief Secretary to Government. 



No. LXXXIV. 

Substance of a Letter from the Honoueable Mottntstuaet Elphinstone, Govbenoe 
of Bombay, to His Highness Stajee Eao Guikwae, dated 3rd April 1820. 

Since my arrival at Baroda we have had many interviews, at which, 
besides increasing the former friendship by personal intercourse, we have had 
various conferences regarding the manner in which you are to be vested' with 
IV 30 



234 Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— Uo. LXXXV. 



the administration of your own government. For the better remembering of 
the points settledj I now commit them to writing. 

All foreign affairs are to remain as hitherto under the exclusive manage- 
ment of the British Government. 

With regard to internal affairs. Your Highness is to be unrestrained, 
provided you fulfil your engagements to the bankers, of which the British 
Grovemment is guarantee. The Resident is, however, to be made acquainted 
with the plan of finance which Your Highness shall determine on at the com- 
mencement of each year. He is to have access to the accounts whenever he 
requires it, and is to be consulted before any new expenses of magnitude are 
incurred. 

The guarantees of the British Government to ministers and other indivi- 
duals must be scrupulously observed. 

Your Highness to choose your own minister, but to consult the British 
Government before you appoint him. 

The identity of interests of the two States will render it necessary for the 
British Government to offer its advice whenever any emergency occurs, but it 
will not interpose in ordinary details, nor will its native agent take a share as 
formerly in the Guikwar government. 

This letter is written in the spirit of entire friendship and good-will 
towards your State, and I look to hear henceforward of your increasing pros- 
perity and reputation. 



No. LXXXV. 



Teanslation of an Answee from the Guikwae Goveenment to the Memgeandtjm regard- 
ing the Peohibition of the Impoet of Opium, dated 17th,Zillay 1235 (25th September 
1820), consisting of the following Aeticles : — 

Aeticle 1. 

Opium must not be supplied from the Company's warehouse, or by merchant 
subjects of the Company, to the merchants and subjects of the Guikwar. 
These are to be supplied with opium by the Guikwar government. 

Article 3. 

Whatever opium is required for the Guikwar warehouse to be obtained 
from the Collector of Kaira through the agency of a vakeel of the Guikwar. 
Should there be a deficiency of opium in the warehouses of both governments, 
and it should be necessary to procure opium from Malwa, a dustick is to be 
given permitting the purchase and the free passage of the article. 

Aeticle 3. 

The Guikwar government will purchase the opium at present in the 
Guikwar districts, and until it is consumed will not purchase from the Com- 
pany's stores. 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— No. LXXXVI. 235 



Article 4. 

Opium is produced in some parts of the Guikwar territories, and it is 
requested therefore that no objection may be made ; this continuing' to be the 
case, when the article is ready, it will be purchased by the government, to 
which it is requested that no objection may be made. 

Aeticle 5. 

The price of opium to be the same in the territories of the two govern- 
ments. 

Aeticie 6. 

It is requested that the price at which opium is sold to the merchants 
and ryots at Kaira, Baroach, and other places, where the government ware- 
houses will be established, and the Malwa price, may be communicated to 
this government every month. 

Article 7. 

Any merchants or individuals, introducing opium secretly for sale into 
the Guikwar territories to be subject to have the property confiscated ; and 
any opium brought secretly from the Company's districts for sale to be con- 
fiscated in like manner, without any objection on the part of the British 
Government. 

Article 8. 

A vakeel of the Guikwar government to be stationed at Kaira, and 
wherever there is a warehouse of the British Government, and opium to be 
supplied for the Guikwar districts through his means ; no opium to be sup- 
plied by other means to merchants and ryots. 



Baeoda Residency, ") (Sd.) C. Noeeis, 

29tA September 1820. ) Acting Resident. 



No. LXXXVI. 

Tbanslation of a Tbeatt between the Bbitish and Guikwae Goveknments, dated the 

3rd of April 1820. 



Guikwar 
Seal. 



With the view of promoting the prosperity, peace, and safety of the 
country, and in order that the Guikwar government shall receive .without 
trouble and with facility the amount of tribute due to it from the provinces 
of Katty war and Mahee Kanta, it has been arranged with the British Govern- 



236 Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— No. LXXXVII. 



ment that His Highness Syajee Rao Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher 
Bahadoor shall not send his troops into the districts belonging to the 
zemindars of both the above provinces without the consent of the Company's 
government, and shall not prefer any claims against the zemindars or 
others residing in those provinces except through the arbitration of the 
Company's government: (on the other hand) the Company's government 
engage that the ' tribute, including Khurajaat, as fixed by the settlements 
of Sumwut 1814, a.d. 1807 and 1808 and of Sumwut 1868, a.d. 1811 and 
1812, shall be paid by the zemindars to the Guikwar government free of 
expense. If in consequence of the misconduct of any zemindar or talookdar 
it becomes necessaiy to incur any considerable expense, the same, without any 
addition thereto, shall be defrayed by the said zemindar. 



No. LXXXVII. 

Tban8LATion of a Mbmoeandum from the Guikwak Goveenment, dated the 13th August 

1825. 

A memorandum has been received from the Residency, dated 9th of the 
first Shrawun Vud (August 9th, 1825), stating that a letter had been received 
by Mr. Willoughby from Mr. Newnham, Chief Secretary to Government, 
teferring to the expedition of Colonel Walker into Kattywar in Sumwut 1864 
(a. D. 1807-08), at which time the settlement in perpetuity for the tribute 
■was adjusted, and pledges obtained from the Jhareja Rajpoots that they would 
desist from their practice of female infanticide. Colonel Walker, it is stated, 
resolved at the time that the sums levied as fines from disturbers of the peace 
and other offenders should, through the clemency of government, be distribut- 
ed in such sums as were suitable to the station in life of the parties concerned, 
to defray the marriage expenses of the females who should be preserved 
through this arrangement. This being brought to the notice of the Bombay 
Government by Captain Barnewall, the orders of government have been for- 
warded to him, that through the British dependencies in Kattywar, the 
sums realized in fines paid by disturbers of the peace should be appropriated 
as above specified ; and Captain Barnewall has accordingly made the necessary 
arrangements. Further, Mr. Newnham's letter requires that information of 
his settlement should be given to the Guikwar government, and a suggestion 
be made of the propriety of its being extended to the Guikwar dependencies 
also, in the same province. In communicating this an early answer was 
solicited, to which it is replied that the case under consideration is on'e of 
charity, and will procure the blessing of heaven on both governments; 
therefore, whatever sums have been realized as fines on offenders since Captain 
Barnewall Was placed in charge of the districts, or any extra revenue beyond 
the tribute as fixed for perpetuity by Colonel Walker, may be appropriated as 
above specified, the disposal being year by year duly communicated to us, 
and the arrangement is highly satisfactory to this government. 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— No. LXXXVIII. 237 



No. LXXXVIII. 

Rules for the Exemption from the Payment of the Duties usually claimed by the 
GuiKWAE GovBKNMEN T On the VESSELS which may be driven by Stbess of Weathbb 
into the Ports of Okamundel, Ameolee, and other Mehals of Katttwar while 
on their voyage between Bombay and the ports of Sindh, agreeably to the Wishes of 
the Bombay Government as intimated to me in a communication, dated 18th Sep- 
tember 1844, No. 553. 

Rule 1. 

Should a boat on her voyage between Bombay and any port in Sindh be 
driven into the mehals of this Sircar by stress of weather, and land its cargo, 
no duty of any kind, and no port or anchorage fee, will be exacted, provided 
the vessel remains in the harbour only a reasonable time. If a single pack- 
age be landed for the purpose of sale or traffic, or if the vessel refuse to 
pursue her voyage when able to do so, then the full amount of duty shall be 
levied on the whole cargo, and every port or other fee be also levied in the 
usual manner and the vessel treated in every respect as if consigned to the 
ports of this Sircar's mehals. 

Rule 2. 

Should a boat, under the circumstances mentioned at the commencement 
of Rule 1, put into the port of Okamundel, &c., in so bad a state as to be 
obliged to discharge her cargo into another boat which conveys it to its 
original destination, no duty will be levied, provided nothing is landed for sale, 
and provided no unnecessary delay takes place in the sailing of the boat with 
the trans-shipped cargo. Damaged goods may be landed and sold, under the 
sanction of the custom-house officers, on payment of the usual duties. 

Rule 3. 

Should a boat, under the above circumstances, put into the ports of 
Okamundel, &c., and undergo repairs, landing her cargo in the meantime, no 
duty will be levied, provided there is no unnecessary delay, and provided that 
on reshipping, every package of the original cargo is duly accounted for to 
the satisfaction of the Custom Master of the port. 

Rule 4. 

Should a boat put into the ports of Okamundel, fee, under the circum- 
stances above mentioned, and undergoes light repairs, without discharging any 
part of her cargo, no duty whatever will be levied, provided the repairs do 
not occupy more than a reasonable number of days. 

Rule 5. 

Should a boat put into the ports of Okamunded, &e., under the above 
circumstances, at the close of the season, and be compelled to lay up for the 
monsoon, security will, in the first place, be given for the full amount of 
customs due on the whole cargo, and all ports and anchorage fees shall be paid. 
The goods may then be landed and warehoused at the expense and risk of the 
owner or tindal of the vessel. The original invoice of the cargo, or an 
authentic copy, shall be deposited with the customs authorities; and if on 



238 Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— No. LXXXIX. 



reshipping it shall be discovered that a single package has been opened or 
missing, and cannot be accounted for satisfactorily, the full amount of customs 
shall be made good according to the security previously given. The goods 
must be reshipped in the same vessel which brought them, unless she be proved 
not sea-worthy, in which case they may be forwarded on another. All 
damaged or perishable goods may be sold under the sanction of the custom- 
house officers and on payment of the usual duties. 

Rule 6. 

When any doubts arise as to the application of any of the above Rules, 
the chief Guikwar authority of the mehals, if unable to settle the matter 
otherwise, will refer to the Political Agent, and act according to his opinion 
and advice. His Highness the Guikwar reserves to himself the full right of 
punishing any tindals, owners, or super-cargoes of boats who attempt to evade 
these regulations and to take advantage of them for the purpose of defrauding 
the revenue of the Durbar. But should the offender belong to foreign juris- 
diction, the Kamdar must refer the case to the Political Agent and act 
according to his advice, and, pending the receipt of that officer's reply, detain 
the offender in custody. The public must be duly made acquainted with 
these rules. 

The same Rules were issued by the Rao of Kutch with reference to the 
port of Mandavee, the only difference being in the last sentence, which runs: 
" But in all such cases the Rao will act in concurrence with and under the 
advice of the Political Agent." 



No. LXXXIX. 

Teanslation of a Yad from His Highness the Gotewae to the Kesident at Baeoda, 
dated 6th Kujjub 1250 (19th May 1850.) 

A Yad has been received from the Residency, under date the 4th instant. 
No. 257, communicating the purport of Mr. Secretary Goldsmid's letter 
relative to the exemption from payment of duties of vessels which, by stress 
of weather, may be driven into any of the ports in Kattywar belonging to 
the Durbar, and requesting that exemption to a similar extent to that conced- 
ed by the Chiefs in Kattywar be made by this government. The Durbar 
has to report that instructions have been issued to the Comavishdars of Oka- 
mundel and Amrolee agreeably to the wishes of the Bombay Government, 
but that should any boat remain in the port many days after the storm has 
ceased, for the sake of convenience, or with the intention of disposing of its 
cargo, or changing the same, from it alone shall duty be exacted ; and the 
merchants in Kattywar residing at the ports belonging to the Durbar have 
also been informed of this arrangement ; and in the event of their experiencing 
any annoyance from the Chiefs in Kattywar, &c., in consequence of 
this arrangement, that they should at once report the circumstance to the 
nearest British authorities, who will investigate the matter. To this effect it 
is requested the Resident will write to the Bombay Government. 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— No. XC. 239 

No. XC. 

Engagement witli the Guikwar in 1832. 

Papee by His Highness the Guikwae, dated the 6tli April 1832. 

Tbe Right Honourable the Earl o£ Clare having told His Highness the 
Guikwar that as His Highness wished to settle the monthly pay of the 3,000 
contingent horse at the disposal of the Company's Sircar, a good arrange- 
ment must be made to secure their being paid according to the Treaty. His 
Highness, after consideration, agrees that he will place in continual deposit 
with the Company Sircar ten lakhs of Rupees in cash, bearing no interest, 
from the present day, and he will pay the above 3,000 horse their monthly 
pay according to the Treaty. If he should fail in so doing, the Company 
Sircar shall, out of the said ten lakhs of Rupees, give to the Sirdar, who 
will, on the part of the Guikwar, be over the horse, the pay of the 3,000 
horse for that month ; according to the 8th Article of the Treaty, and accord- 
ing to custom, the said Sirdar shall pay the 3,000 horse, and the money thus 
taken out of the sum deposited shall be replaced by the Guikwar to complete 
the annual regular deposit of ten lakhs always. A conference on this having 
passed between His Lordship and the Guikwar, it is prayed that His Lordship, 
taking the above into consideration, will be pleased to release the mehals in . 
sequestration, in which will be shown the goodness and reputation of His 
Lordship. 

Bated Baroda, hth Zilhad, or &th dprtl 1832. 



FiNAii Papee executed by the Eight Honoueablb Loed Claee, dated the 

6th April 1832. 

A memorandum has been received from His Highness the Guikwar, 
dated the 5th Zilkad; its contents are as follows : — There are 3,000 horse at 
the service of the British Government; His Highness the Guikwar agrees 
that he will place in continual (or running) deposit with the Company's Sircar 
ten lakhs of Rupees in cash, bearing no interest, from the present day, and he 
will pay the above 3,000 horse their monthly pay according to the Treaty; if 
His Highness should fail in so doing, the Company Sircar shall, out of the 
said ten lakhs of Rupees, give to the Sirdar, who will, on the part of the 
Guikwar, be over the horse, the pay of the 3,000 horse for that month ; and 
according to the 8th Article of the Treaty, and according to custom, the said 
Sirdar shall pay the 3,000 horse, and the money thus taken out of the sum 
deposited shall be replaced by the Guikwar to complete the annual regular 
deposit of ten lakhs always ; His Highness prays, therefore, that the mehals 
sequestrated be released. His Lordship agrees to the above; therefore. on the 
abovementioned continual deposit being placed with the British Government, 
the mehals shall be released from sequestration fifteen days after the date of 
the deposit, when the Chor Chittees shall be delivered up. 

£aroda, Uh April 1832. 



240 Baroda Agency— The Gaebwar— ITo. XCI. 



No. XCI. 

Teanslation of a Memoeandum presented by His Highness Stajee Eao Guikwae 'to 
the HoNOTTEABLB the GovEENOB at Baeoda, dated 8th of Zilhez 1241, or 1st February 
1841. 

In consequence of disputes existing between tlie British Govei-nment and 
the Guikwar State, His Excellency the Governor of Bombay, Sir J. Carnac, 
Bart., has visited Baroda, and a personal conference has taken place. Much 
discussion arose on the subject of the 3,000 horse kept up by the Guikwar 
State at the disposal of the British Government, and on their so remaining 
according to the Treaty at their present strength, and also on the payment 
by the Guikwar of the new Risala raised b'y the British Government; the 
Guikwar, having in view a perfect friendship and union between the two 
States and the full contentment of the distinguished Governor, agrees to pay 
the new Risala from the day ou which it was raised up to the end of the 
month of Pons in the Sumwut year 1897 (January 1841), giving credit in 
the accounts for the amount, and from that date to allow the expense of the 
Risala, at an annual charge not exceeding three lakhs of Rupees, to be deduct- 
ed from the collections of the tribute made on account of His Highness by 
the British Government : the Risala is to remain, as at present, entirely under 
the orders of the British Government. 



Tsanslation of a Memoeandum presented by the Honoiteable the Goteenoe Sie J. E. 
Caenac, Baet., to His Highness the Guikwae, on the 1st February 1841. 

The British Government having made a proposal to His Highness the 
Guikwar to keeping up 1,500 horse out of the 3,000 maintained by His 
Highness, to which proposal His Highness did not consent, as not appearing 
in accordance with the Treaty j in consequence of the re-establishment of 
the friendship between the two. States, it is determined that the treaty 
between the States, including the matter of the 3,000 horse, is to remain in 
force. 



Teanslation of a Lettee addressed to the Honotjeable Sie J. E. Caenac, Baet., &o., by 
His Highness Stajee Eao Guikwae, dated 15th of Zilhez, Sumwut 1897, 8th 
February 1841. 

A demand has been made that out of the 3,000 horse maintained by 
Treaty by this government at the disposal of the Honourable Company, 
1,500 horse should be taken by the Honourable Company; but this does not 
appear correct under the Treaty, and by keeping the 3,000 horse, which are 
at present at the disposal of the Honourable Company, the appearance of per- 
fect friendship between the two States and reputation will remain established. 
In this there should be no difference. Earnestly desiring that there should be no 
dispute between the two governments, and that a good understanding should 
exist, as formerly, I wrote to you with great urgency, inviting you to visit 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— Wo. XCI. 241 



me, which you have kindly done ; and on your arrival at Baroda, I have 
explained to you all my difficulties, the pressure of my debts, and the expenses of 
my family and dependants. You then spoke to me on the subject of bearing 
the expenses of Roberts's new Rissala of horse, upon which, as I desired to 
do nothing beyond your wishes, and considered you as my father and protec- 
tor, I gave my consent to allow annually to the extent of three lakhs of 
Rupees in the accounts for the cost of this Risala (agreeably to the new 
demand now made upon me); including the back pay (from the date on which 
the corps was raised), being iaflueaced entirely by my confidence in you and 
my own helplessness. But I now represent to the Honourable Company and 
to your Honor that the debt on this State is heavy ; that the expenses of my 
family and hereditary dependants are great. This you have yourself seen ; 
and it is for the Honourable Company and for your Honor to enable me to 
support this, and to confirm the prosperity and reputation of the Guikwar 
State. The burden of myself and of my government rests entirely upon you, 
and my prosperity and reputation are yours. The Honourable Company and 
your Honor are alike the protector of my dignity, and from you it will meet 
with no molestation. I am acting in accordance with the Honourable Com- 
pany's government; therefore, as, in consequence of the new burden of three 
lakhs of Rupees per annum, which the maintenance of this body of horse 
entails on the Guikwar government, the welfare of this government is placed 
in difficulty, it is earnestly requested for the satisfaction of this government 
that your Honor will, in kindness and without considering it a diminution 
of friendship, procure from the Honourable Company a release from this 
stipulation. 



Lettbe to His Highness the Guikwae, dated 8th February 1841. 

Before leaving Baroda, to which place I have come at the earnest request 
of your Highness, I deem it right to address to you a few words of advice 
on the completion of the business which has been engaging my attention 
during my stay, and on the restoration of the good understanding between 
your Highness and the British Government, which, I trust, may never again 
be disturbed. 

Your Highness' acquiescence in the demand made upon you for the 
maintenance of the Risalajjf horse now under Major Roberts, and of a' body 
of horse for service in the tributary districts, combined with the earnest desire 
which you have evinced for a reconciliation with the British Government, 
and your promises to preserve inviolate all existing guarantees, and to be 
guided by the counsels of the British Representative at your Highness' 
Court, has enabled me to renew the bonds of amity between the two govern- 
ments, which had been broken by repeated acts of your Highness : and it is 
with pleasure that I have been able, in consequence, to restore to your High- 
ness the sequestrated pergunnah of Petlaud and the revenues of the tributary 
districts. I have likewise, at your earnest request and on your promise to 
allow in the accounts of the tribute for whatever sum may be awarded to the 
Dessai of Nowsarie, removed the attachment on that cusba. 

IV 31 



242 Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— No. XCI, 



Before restoring Petlaud to your Highness, I should have deemed it 
necessary to require from you in writing the most ample security against the 
ill-treatment of any of your Highness'' subjects in that district in conse- 
quence of their adherence to the British Government while in temporary 
occupation of it. In deference, however, to your strong remonstrances 
against this measure, as being derogatory to your dignity and honour as a 
sovereign Prince; unnecessary, judging from the absence of all complaint 
from the districts formerly under attachment, which were released during 
the government of Lord Clare ; and dapgerous as likely to give rise to causes 
of colUsion, I refrained from pressing it on your Highness, and contented 
myself with receiving from you a solemn promise that you would act towards 
the ryots of Petlaud as towards the rest of your Highness' subjects, and 
allow, them to suffer no molestation whatever on account of their having 
obeyed the orders of the British authorities, or assisted them in the manage- 
ment of that province. Your Highness will recollect that this promise wsig 
made without reservation in the presence of the Chief Secretary in attendahc^- 
on me, the Resident, and his Assistant, and on the full understanding that 
a breach of it would, although no written engagement was executed, subject 
the district to re-attachment and final annexation to the British territory. 
I repose implicit confidence in your Highness' promise, and I feel assured 
that on no occasion shall I regret having done so ; but at the same time I 
deem it my duty again to repeat that the British Government will never sub- 
mit to a breach of this promise, or allow the shadow of an imputation of bad 
faith to rest upon it by a neglect to secure from oppression those who are, on 
all principles of justice, entitled to our protection. 

Your Highness is aware that the demand which I made upon you, as the 
basis of any settlement and of the restoration of the good understanding 
between the two governments, was for the maintenance of Major Roberts's 
Risala from your Highness' revenues, to be subject entirely to the control 
of the British Government; and to the provision by your Highness of a 
body of horse, of the nature required by the Treaty of 1817, of not less 
than 1,500 men for service in Kattywar, &c., the districts on which we collect 
your Highness' tributes. Your Highness consented to the maintenance of 
Robert's horse in the manner proposed, but desired that you might be allowed 
in addition to keep up the whole contingent required by the 8th Article of 
the Treaty of 3,000 horse, in order that the terms" of the Treaty might be 
strictly observed. I consented to this, but at the same time I informed you 
'that the British Government required only 1,500 for service in Kattywar, &c. 
Should your Highness at any period desire to reduce your contingent to that 
number for employment in those provinces, no objection will be raised to 
that proceeding ; but in that number your Highness must retain those persons, 
as Meer Surapaz Ali and others, whose restoration to your service has already 
been acceded to by your Highness as one of the demands which the British 
Government made against you. 

Your Highness, on the conference which I had with you on the 2nd 
instant, presented me with a memorandum of 31 items on matters requiring 
settlement, I informed Your Highness that after perusing them, the greater 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— No. XCI. 243 



part of these were matters which must be left to the Resident to adjust. 
On two points, however, I explained to you the determination of the British 
Government, which it is well that I should here repeat : they relate to the 
attendance of the Resident and the British troops at the festivals of the 
Dussara and Gunputtee, and the presentation of honorary dresses (Aher) by 
the Resident on the part of the British Government, on festive occasions, on 
Your Highness' family. 

It is needless here to recapitulate the grounds on which the decision of 
the British Government on these points is founded. It is sufficient to state, 
in respect to the first, that 1 have instructed the Resident to pay to Your 
Highness, as the head of the Guikwar State, the requisite honours on your 
progress on these State occasions j he will accordingly, on receiving from 
you an intimation of the day and hour at which your procession will leave 
the palace, attend with the troops at some convenient spot, which will be fixed 
upon in communication with Your Highness, and there, without joining in 
^he procession, pay all military honours due to your rank. I trust Your 
Highness will be satisfied with the concession, which is the utmost that can 
be admitted under the imperative orders of superior authority. 

It is contrary to the rule established for the guidance of the Honourable 
Company that presents should on any occasion be given or received. Although, 
as head of the Government of Bombay, I have thought fit to admit a devia- 
tion from this rule (and I am happy to have had it in my power, during my 
present visit, to present an Aher to Your Highness on the occasion of the 
birth of a son to Your Highness' eldest son, Rao Sahib), the Resident canriot 
be permitted to accept or present such gifts. 

I must urge on Your Highness the absolute necessity of your strictly 
ohserving the repeated promises you have made to me to respect in their fullest 
extent all guarantees of the British Government ; a contrary course has already 
brought Your Highness to the verge of ruin, and you may rest assured that 
it is only by an implicit maintenance of these engagements that the good 
understanding now happily re-established between the two governments can 
contiruie. The British Government in no way wishes to interfere in the 
internal administration of Your Highness' territory, of which it acknow- 
ledges you to be the sole sovereign. It will enjoin upon all holders of the 
British guarantee to regard you in that light on pain of its severe displeasure, 
and to observe the utmost respect and submission in all communications with 
Your Highness ; but still it cannot be released from the obligation of seeing 
that Your Highness preserves inviolate, in the most minute particulai-, every 
Bhandaree engagement of which the British Government is a party. 

I have on several occasions taken an opportunity of speaking to Your 
Highness on the subject of the evil advisers by whose eo^insel Your Highness 
has been led into difiiculty, and more especially of Veneeram Aditram. I 
have received with pleasure Your Highness' assurances that, since your pro- 
claimed dismissal of that individual, you have had no communication, direct 
or indirect, with him, and I rely on your adhering to th^ determination to 
banish him from your service and your counsels for ever. 



244 Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— No. XCI. 



When I consented; at Your Highness' earnest solicitation, at our meeting 
of the Snd instant, to admit the introduction to me of certain individuals 
whose removal from your service had been required of you in consequence of 
their being the friends and associates of Veneeram, your dismissed minister, 
I begged Your Highness clearly to understand that my consent was given 
purely out of a regard to Your Highness' feelings, and in no respect as 
indicating my confidence in them, or in their fitness for employment in Your 
Highness' service. I have confidence in Your Highness alone and in your 
reiterated promises to reject the advice of evil-disposed persons, and to study 
never again to incur the displeasure of the British Government. 

Your Highness will be careful, therefore, never to employ any of these 

individuals in any transaction whatever 

&L^r I tbotpra'.i.h. With the British Government, or in any 

business connected with our guarantees, 

the holders of which have been on many occasions so grievously oppressed. 

1 have spoken to Your Highness on the subject of the nomination of a 
minister : you are aware that you are bound to appoint a person to this ofiice, 
with the approbation of the British Government. You inform me that you 
desire no minister, and that you will yourself transact all matters of business 
with the Resident. As a mark of my friendship for Your Highness and of 
my confidence in the continuance of this good understanding which I observe 
to exist between you and the Resident at your Court, I have consented to 
waive the demand for the fulfilment of this stipulation during such period 
as Your Highness may act up to your profession, and be guided, in all matters 
in which the British Government has any concern, by the good counsel of the 
British Representative. I feel confident that the trust which I am reposing 
on your Highness will not be misplaced, and that it will not be necessary, at 
any future period, to enforce on you a measure to which you express yourself 
decidedly averse. 

Having happily restored our former friendly relations, which, I trust, 
can never again be interrupted, I leave you in the full expectation that you 
will faithfully and implicitly observe all existing Treaties and engagements ; 
that you will respect in the minutest point every existing Bhandaree, adjust- 
ing, in communication with the Resident, every pending dispute on just and 
equitable principles, and allowing no occasion to arise for future differences ; 
and that you will study by every means in your power to consolidate your 
alliance with the British Government. I have appointed to your Court a 
Resident, Mr. Boyd, with whom I am gratified to observe that Your Highness 
is on the most friendly footing of intimacy and cordiality ; and I recommend 
Your Highness to continue this good understanding with him and to be 
guided by his friendly advice. Finally, I congratulate Your Highness on the 
state of kindness and unanimity which I observe to exist between the several 
members of Your Highness' immediate family, and I beg to assure you that 
I shall ever take the warmest interest in their welfare. I rejoice that I have 
had this opportunity of visiting you, and renewing that intimacy which com- 
menced with your«early youth ; and I entreat you to believe that, in all the 
advice which I have given you (I trust effectually), I have been influenced 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— No. XCII. 245 



solely by a regard to your own welfare and to the maintenance of your high 
position as the head of the Guikwar State. It will ever be to me a source 
of much gratification to hear of Your Highness' welfare, and to be informed 
that, by a strict adherence to existing engagements. Your Highness has 
merited the oblivion of the past, and is pursuing a steady and honest course 
for the future. I now bid Your Highness an affectionate farewell. 

(Sd.) J. E. Caenac. 
8a February 1841. 



No. XCII. 



Tbanslation of Yad from Beigadiee Genbeal Sie R. C. Shakespeae, Resident at 
Baeoda, to His Highness Mahaeajah EnrNDi Rao Guikwae Sena Khas Khetl 
Shumshee Bahadooe, No. 471, dated Baroda Residency, the 14th June 1858. 

The Right Honourable Lord Elphinstone, Governor of Bombay, Major 
General Roberts, lately Commanding Northern Division of the Army, and 
myself, have all written to the Right Honourable the Governor General of 
India, mentioning the friendship of the Guikwar and the assistance afforded 
by him during the past year. 

To-day I have received a letter from the Secretary to the Government 
of India, with the Governor General at Allahabad, No. 1519, of date the 
31st May 1858, informing me that His Lordship is so gratified at hearing of 
His Highness Khundi Rao Guikwar's fidelity and devotion that he has been 
pleased to order that all that part of the kharita of Sir James Carnac, Gover- 
nor of Bombay, to Syajee Rao Maharaj, of date 8th February 1841, which 
relates to Roberts's Risala and the Guikwar contingent horse, and also the 
whole of the yad of Maharajah Syajee Rao Guikwar, of date 1st February 
1841, agreeing to pay three lakhs of Rupees a year for the maintenance of 
Roberts's Risala — these three matters above written, namely, what is Tvritten 
in the kharita about the Risala and about the contingent horse, and the Yad 
regarding the three lakhs — shall be remitted, and that in future the 
arrangement on these points between the two governments shall be that 
specified in the 8th Article of the Treaty of 6th November 1817; but 
when the 3,000 contingent horse are not required to go with the subsidiary 
force on service, then, in the same way as at present they do duty in 
the tributary mehals in Guzerat and Kattywar, they shall continue doing duty 
in the tributary mehals as the British Government may require. 

The Secretary to the Government of India does not mention in his letter 
the date from which this arrangement is to commence, but I will write, and 
on the answer -ai'riving I will inform the Mabaraj. 

I have great pleasure in communicating this good news. The Maharajah 
has always acted towards me as a friend, and I enjoy this good news which 
has come for the Maharajah as much as if it concerned myself. 



24e Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— No. XCII. 

Tkanslation from His Highness Maharajah Khtjndi Eao Gfikwae Sena Khas 
Khbtl Shumshee Bahadoob, to Beigadiee Gbnbeai, Sie E. C. Shakbspeae, 
Resident at Baeoda, No. 625, dated the 17th June 1858. 

A. Yad, No. 471, of date 14th June 185H, has been received from the 
Residency to the following effect : — That the Right Honourable Lord Elphin- 
stone, Governor of Bombay, and Major General Roberts, Commanding the 
Northern Division of the Army, and I, vsrrote to the Right Honourable the 
Governor General of India particulars regarding the friendship of the Guik- 
war Sircar and the assistance it had afforded during the past year. That on 
this a letter. No. 1519, dated 31st May 1858, from the Secretary to the Gov- 
ernment of India, has been received to the following effect : — That the 
Right Honourable the Governor. General Bahadoor being greatly pleased on 
bearing the accounts of the fidelity and friendship of the Maharajah Khundi 
Rao Guikwar Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor, has given an order for 
the remission of the three matters as here detailed, namely, all that which is 
written about Roberts Sahib's Risala and about the contingent horse in Gov- 
ernor Carnac Sahib's kharita vrritten on 8th February 1841, and the Yad 
of 1st February 1841 which Syajee Rao Maharaj wrote^ agreeing to give 
three lakhs a year for the maintenance of Roberts Sahib's Risala; and that 
in future the arrangement on the above matters between the two governments 
will proceed according to the 8th Article of the Treaty executed on 6th 
November 1817 ; but when the contingent horse are not required to go with 
the subsidiary force on service, then, in the same way as at present they do 
duty in the tributary mehals in Guzerat and Kattywar, they shall continue 
doing duty in the tributary mehals as the British Government may require ; 
that in the letter from the Secretary to the Government of India the date 
from which this arrangement is to commence is not written; therefore I will 
write regarding that point, and on receiving the answer I will inform the 
Maharajah, 

I beg to reply that I have been very greatly pleased on seeing the eon- 
tents to the effect that the Right Honourable the Governor General, in the 
way of kindness and patronage, has remitted the three lakhs for the expense 
of the Risala, and I beg to write that in future there will remain on the part 
of this Sircar the arrangement for 3,000 sowars remaining in service accord- 
ing to the received request written in the Yad. 

By this being done I am greatly obliged, and it is good in respect to 
good report, and the friendship between the two governments has been clearly 
displayed. From the expense also of the Risala falling (on me), the weight 
of debt was going on increasing up to the present day, and this caused much 
anxiety. In short, the character, good name, and honour of this government 
are of the Honourable Company Bahadoor and the Right Honourable the 

Governor General Bahadoor; therefore, in 

Governor General.^""'"''''^^' *' "^^* °* friendship, I beg to address my patron* 

to the effect that the friendship of the two 
governments has come down from generation to generation, and for the 
increase of it I have always been careful and have acted according to the- 
good advice of the Resident Sahib. 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— No. XCIII. 247 

Therefore, Laving taken the above written substance into consideration^ 
I hope that you will forward to the Right Honourable the Governor General 
from this government the representation of its pleasure. 



Khxteeeta to the Guikwab. 

After compliments. — I have learnt with great satisfaction^ from the 
reports which the Resident at your Highness' Court has from time to time 
submitted to me, the acts by which your Highness has shown in an un- 
mistakeable manner throughout the late disturbances that your Highness has 
identified your own cause with that of the British Government on behalf of 
the authorities in England and of myself : I thank you heartily for the proofs 
of friendship which you have afforded during a time of trouble. 

In consideration of your fidelity and friendship, I have resolved to remit 
the payment of the sum of Rupees three lakhs per annum, which was imposed 
upon the Guikwar State in the year 1841 for the maintenance of the Guzerat 
Irregular Horse ; and as a mark of consideration for your Highness, I have 
further determined that this remission shall have retrospective effect from the 
date of your Highness' accession to the guddee. 

I have much pleasure in forwarding for your Highness' acceptance a pair 
of Morchals, and trust that they may be regarded as a token of the cordial 
esteem in which your Highness is held by the British Government. 

(Sd.) Canning. 



No. XCIII. 



Tkanslation of a Yad from His Highness the Gtjikwae to the Resident at Baeoda, 

dated 14th May 1856, No. 460. 

A Yad was addressed by this government on the 29th February last. 
No. 232, regarding the land to be given by us for the use of the railway ; to 
this a reply has been received from the Residency, under date the 12th May, 
No. 420, stating that the Yad in (juestion not being sufiiciently explicit, the 
Governor General entertained some doubts on the subject, and requesting His 
Highness will kindly, in order to remove all doubts and uncertainty for the 
future, cede the sovereignty and authority over the land required for the rail- 
way to the goveriiment of India. 

2. In reply we beg to say, as stated in our Yad No. 423, we shall cede 
the land required for the railway, and the full sovereignty of this land will 
rest exclusively with the government of India for railway purposes, but this 
government entertained no uncertainty or doubt whatever in giving up the 
land for the road; and as this has been stated in the Yad referred to, it is a 



248 Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— Nos, XCIV. & XCV. 



matter of regret to this govemmentj and we beg the Resident will kindly 
write to the Governor General and explain this to him, as this government in 
every way is dependent on the Governor General. 

Taking this into consideration we write that this busines (railway) should 
cause no loss to our revenue in the customSj &c.j as stated in our Yad of 29th 
February, No. 232, and we -beg to receive a reply to this effect. 



No. XCIV. 

Adoption Sunnud granted to His Highness the Maharajah Guikwae of Baeoda. 

Her Majesty being desirous that the governments of the several Princes and 
Chiefs of India who now govern their own territories, should be perpetuated, 
and that the representation and dignity of their Houses should be continued, I 
hereby, in fulfilment of this desire, convey to you the assurance that on failure 
of natural heirs, the adoption by yourself and future rulers of your State of a 
successor according to Hindoo law and to the customs of your race Jwill be 
recognized and confirmed. 

Be assured that nothing shall disturb the engagement thus made' to you 
so long as your House is loyal to the Crown and faithful to the conditions of 
the Treaties, grants, or engagements which record its obligations to the British 
Government. 

Tlie Wth March 1862. (Sd.) Canning. 



No. XCV. 

Peoclamation. 

To all whom it may concern. 

Be it known that Whereas an attempt has been made at Baroda to poison 
Colonel R. Pbayre, C.B., the late British Resident at the Court of His High- 
ness the Gaekwar, and evidence has been adduced to the effect that His 
Highness Mulhar Rao Gaekwar instigated the said attempt to administer 
poison to Colonel Phayre ; : 

And, Whereas to instigate sucfh attempt would be a high crime against 
Her Majesty the Queen and a breach of the condition of loyalty '±q the 
Crown under which Mulhar Rao Gaekwar is recognized as ruler of the Baroda 
State, and moreover such an attempt would be an act of hostility against the 
British Government, and it is necessary fully and publicly to enquire into 
the truth of the charge and to afford His Highness Mulhar Rao Gaekwar 
every opportunity of freeing himself from the grave suspicion which attaches 
to him ; 



Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— No. XCVI. 249 



And Whereas in consequence thereof it is necessary to suspend Mulliar 
Rao Gaekwar from the exercise of power and to make other arrangements 
for the administration of tTie Baroda State : 

It is hereby notified that from this date the Viceroy and Governor-General 
of India in Council temporarily assumes the administration of the Baroda 
State, and delegates all the powers necessary for the conduct of the adminis- 
tration "to the Agent to the Governor-General and Special Commissioner, at 
Baroda. The administration will be conductedj as far as possiblcj in accord- 
ance with the usages, customs, and laws of the country. 

All Sirdars, Inamdars, Zemindars, and inhabitants of the Baroda terri- 
tories, and all officers and persons whatsoever in the civil and military service 
of the Baroda State, or liable to be called upon for such service, are hereby 
required to submit to the authority of and render obedience to the said Agent 
to the Governor-General and Special Commissioner during such time as the 
State may be under the administration of the British Government. 

In accordance with the gracious intimation made to the Princes and 
Chiefs of India that it is the desire of Her Majesty the Queen that their 
Governments should be perpetuated, and the Representation and Dignity of 
their Houses should be continued, a Native Administration will be re- 
established in such manner as may be determined upon after the conclusion 
of the enquiry and after consideration of the results which such enquiry may 
elicit. 

By order of the Viceroy and Governor-General of India in Council, 

FoET William, ) (Sd.) C. U. Aitchison, 

The IMh January 1875. ) Secy, to the Govt, of India. 



No. XCVI. 

Pboclamation. 
To all whom it may concern. 

His Highness Mulhar Rao, Gaekwar, was suspended from the exercise of 
power, aiid the administration of the Baroda State was temporarily assumed 
by the British Government, in order that a public enquiry might be made 
into the truth of the imputation that His Highness had instigated an attempt • 
to poison Colonel R. Phayre, C.B., the late Representative of the British 
Government at the court of Baroda, and that every opportunity should be 
given to His Highness of freeing himself from the said imputation. 

The proceedings of the Commission having been brought to a close, Her 
Majesty's Government have taken into consideration the question whether His 
Highness Mulhar Rao, Gaekwar, shall be restored to the exercise of sovereign 
power in the State of Baroda. 

IV ^2 



250 Baroda Agency— The Gaekwar— Wo. XCVI. 



The Commissioners being divided in opinion, Her Majesty's Government 
bave not based their decision on the epquiry or repgrt of the Commission, nor 
have they assumed that the result of the enquiry has been to prove the truth 
of the imputations against His Highness. 

Having regard, however, to all the circumstances relating to the affairs 
of Baroda from the accession of His Highness Mulbar Rao, Gaekwar, to the 
present time, his notorious misconduct, his gross misgovernment of the State, 
and his evident incapacity to carry into effect the necessary reforms ; having 
also considered the opinion of the Government of India tliat it vrould be 
detrimental to the interests of the people of Baroda and inconsistent with the 
maintenance of the relations which ought to subsist between the British 
Government and the Baroda State that His Highness should be restored to 
power. Her Majesty's Government have decided that His Highness Mulbar 
Rao, Gaekwar, shall be deposed from the sovereignty of Baroda, and that he 
and his issue shall be hereafter precluded from all rights, honors, and piivi- 
leges thereto appertaining. 

Accordingly His Excellency the Viceroy and Governor-General in 
Council hereby declares that His Highness Mulhar Rao, Gaekwar, is deposed 
from the sovereignty of the Baroda State, and th:it he and his issue are 
precluded from all rights, honors, and privileges thereto appertaining. 

Mulhar Rao will be permitted to select some place in British India, 
which may be approved by the Government of India, where he and his 
family shall reside with a suitable establishment and allowances to be provided 
from the revenues of the Baroda State. 

Her Most Gracious Majesty the Queen, in re-establishing a Native Admi- 
nistration in the Baroda State, being desirous to mark her sense of the loyal 
services of His Highness Khundee Rao, Geakwar, in 1875, has been pleased 
to accede to the request of his widow. Her Highness Jumnabaee, that she 
may be allowed to adopt some member of the Gaekwar house, whom the 
Government of India may select as the most suitable person upon whom to 
confer the sovereignty of the Baroda State. 

The necessary steps will accordingly be immediately taken to carry into 
effect Her Majesty's commands. In the meantime, with the consent of His 
Highness the Maharaja of Indoi-e, Sir Madava Rao, K.C.S.I., will at once 
proceed to Baroda, and conduct the administration of the State as Prime 
Minister, under instructions which he will receive from the Governor-General's 
Agent and Special Commissioner at Baroda. 

In conferring the sovereignty of the Baroda State, no alteration will be 
made in the Treaty engagements which exist between the British Government 
and the Gaekwars of Baroda, and the new Gaekwar will enjoy all the pri- 
vileges and advantages which were conveyed to the Gaekwar of Baroda in 
the Sunnud of Earl Canning, dated the 11th of March 1862. 

By Order of His Excellency the Viceroy 

and Governor-General of India in Council, 

(Sd.) C. U. AlTCHISON, 

Me IM April 1875. Secretary to the Government of India. 



REWA KANTA. 

Bombay Government Records, No. XXIII. of new Series and Reports hy the 

Bombay Government. 

The only Chief in Rewa Kanta^ who enjoys first class jurisdietionj that iSj 
power to try for capital offences any persons except British subjects^ is the 
Rajah of Rajpeepla. The Chiefs of Chota Oodeypore, Deogurh Barrea, 
Loonawara, Soanth, and Balasinore have second class jurisdiction^ that is, 
power to try for capital offences their own subjects only. Offences committed 
in the latter States by foreigners or British subjects, and all offences committed 
in the smaller Mewassee States, are tried by the Rewa Kanta court of 
criminal justice, presided over by the Political Agent. This court was estab- 
lished in 1842 by an order from the Court of Directors, dated 12th January 
in that year. 

In 1840 the leading Chiefs of Rewa Kanta, following the example of 
the Gaekwar, entered into Engagements (No. XCVII.) to prevent suttee. 

In 1872 British copper coinage was introduced into the States under this 
Agency, on the understanding that no more native coin should be issued by 
the States from their own mints, that only British coin should be a legal 
tender, and that it should not be issued at a discount. 

The area of the States under the Rewa Kanta Agency is about 4,600 
square miles, with a population of 487,647 souls, and a revenue estimated at 
fifteen lakhs of rupees. The Chiefs pay a tribute of Rupees 1,30,000, of 
which about frd is paid to the Gaekwar. 

Rajpeepla. — The Chiefs of this State, who are Gohel Rajpoots, maintained 
their independence till the time of Akbar, who imposed on them a tribute of 
Rupees 35,556 in lieu of a subsidy of horse and_ foot which about three 
centuries before they had agreed to furnish. On the decline of the Mahomedan 
power the tribute, which had been very irregularly paid, was reimposed by the 
Gaekwar, who gradually increased his encroachments on the independence of 
the State, till in 1813 the entire management was in the hands of his own 
ofiicers; the net annual payments taken from the State were Rupees 92,000, 
and the whole revenues were collected and paid into the Gaekwar's treasury. 

Ajub Sing, an imbecile Chief, who succeeded to the State on the death of 
his brother in 1786, died in 1803. He had attempted to disinherit his eldest 
son, Ram Sing, and to secure the succession of his younger son, Nahr Sing; 



252 Eewa Kanta Agency— Rajpeepla. 

but the former was released from confinement and placed in power by the 
troops. From his intemperate habits Ram Sing became incapable of ruling, 
and in 1810 the Gaekwar invested his reputed son, Pertab Sing, and conferred 
on him the government of Rajpeepla by a Sunnud (No. XCVIII.), to which 
the British Government agreed to affix their guarantee. Ram Sing died a few 
months afterwards, and was succeeded by Pertab Sing. Nahr Sing, the 
brother of the late Rajah, however, set up his claim to succeed on the ground 
that Pertab Sing was not the son of Ram Sing, but supposititious and 
purchased by Ram Sing's wife. Por four years the country was distracted by 
the quarrel, till in 1815 the Gaekwar marched a force into the country, and it 
was agreed that the Gaekwar should conduct the administration till he had 
reimbursed himself for the expenses incurred, and that Nahr Sing and Pertab 
Sing should submit their claims to investigation. The efforts of the Gaekwar 
to settle the country were unavailing, and the investigation was therefore 
undertaken by the Resident at Baroda in 1819. The enquiry resulted in the 
establishment of Nahr Sing's elaim^j and the admission by the Gaekwar of 
his right to the succession ; but as Nahr Sing was blind and incapacitated 
from ruling, his eldest son, Verisal, was invested with the government on 
15th November 1831, and the Gaekwar relinquished his control over Rajpeepla 
to the British Government in the same way as in Kattiawar and Mahee Kanta. 
A proclamation of amnesty was issued in the name of the British Government, 
the Gaekwar, and Verisal, from whom an Engagement (No. XCIX.) was 
taken, binding him and his successors to act in conformity with the advice of 
the British Government. At the same time the Rajah engaged (No. C.) 
to pay annually through the British Government his tribute to the Gaekwar, 
which was fixed at Rupees 65,001, equivalent to Government Rupees 56,731-3-9, 
and to make an annual provision of Rupees 8,400 for Sooruj Koer (since dead) 
and Pertab Sing, who resigned all pretensions to the State. The relations of 
the Rajah to the British Government were more fully defined in another 
Engagement (No. CI.) concluded on 36th November 1833. 

Verisal being a minor, the British Government for some years undertook 
the management of the State which was almost bankrupt. The debts, how- 
ever, were reduced to about one-third of their amount, and for their liquida- 
tion the most productive portions of the State were farmed for seven years 
under the British guarantee. Verisal was entrusted with the administration 
on his attaining his majority in 1837, but a supervision was exercised over 
the State till 1850 when it was withdrawn. 



Rewa'Kanta Agency— Deogurh Barrea. 253 

In 1852 an Engagement (No. CII.) was mediated by the British Govern- 
ment between the Gaekwar and the Rajah of Rajpeepla, by which some 
old disputes were settled by the transfer of certain villages in which both 
governments had shares to the Gaekwar and the Rajah respectively^ and the 
admission of the right of the Rajah of Rajpeepla to collect certain customs 
on payment of Rupees 13,351; equivalent to Government Rupees 11,650-5-7 
annually. On the 20th January 1859 the Government of India decided that 
Rajpeepla should pay Government Rupees 20,000 annually towards the main- 
tenance of the Guzerat Bheel Corps, which had been raised during the mutiny. 
It was subsequently converted into a police corps and as no part of it was 
employed in Rajpeepla the Rajah was- relieved from any demand on account of 
its expenses from 1st May 1865. If however troops are employed in Rajpeepla, 
the Rajah is held liable to such a contribution on that account for the time 
the troops are so employed as Government may think fit and reasonable. 

Verisal abdicated in 1860 in favour of his son, Gumbheer Sing, 
still retaining, however, the principal share of government in his own hands 
as minister of the State. Differences however arose between father and 
son and became so irreconcilable that in 1867, Government was compelled 
to interpose its authority and requii-e the withdrawal of Verisal from all 
interference in Rajpeepla affairs. He died in the following year. Gum-i 
bheer Sing has received a Sunnud (No. XVIII.), guaranteeing to him the 
right of adoption. He is thirty years of age. 

The area of Rajpeepla is 1,514 square miles, the population 120,036 
souls, and the gross revenue Rupees 8,00,000, of which Rupees 65,000 are paid 
as tribute to the Gaekwar. The military force of the State consists of 6 field 
and 3 other guns, 100 cavalry, and 356 infantry and police. He is entitled to 
a salute of eleven guns. 

Deogurh Barrea. — This family are Chohan Rajpoots who formerly ruled 
at Powagurh, and were driven by the Mahomedan conquests to seek a refuge 
among the Bheels. From Pertab Sing, the founder of the family, is also 
descended in -the elder line the family of Cliota Oodeypore. The connection 
of the British Government with this State commenced in 1803, when Scin- 
dia's districts in Guzerat were taken possession of by a British force, at which 
time Jeswunt Sing was Rajah of Barrea. The conduct of the Rajah was 
most friendly, and he was, in consideration of his services, declared entitled 
to British protection under Article 10 of the Treaty of Surjee Anjengaum.* 



* See Vol. III., page 277. 



254 Rewa Kanta Agency— Deogurh Barrea. 

Jeswunt Sing was succeeded in the government of Barrea by his son, 
Gunga Dass, an imbecile character, during whose rule the country was laid 
waste by the Mahratta armies, who, however, established no claim to perma- 
nent tribute. His power was also usurped by a Brahmin minister, who with 
mercenary troops devastated the neighbouring districts till 1819, when the 
interference of the British Government was solicited, and a settlement* was 
effected, by which the country was delivered from their violence. In the same 
year throifgh the mediation of the British Government certain dues which 
the Rajahs of Barrea had for many years levied from the districts of Hallol, 
Kallol, and Dohud were commuted to an annual payment of Rupees 4,750, 
equivalent to Government Rupees 4,144-15-1, which since the cession of 
Scindia's Panch Mehals under the Treaty of 12th Decemberf 1860, is now 
paid to the Rajah by the British Government out of the tribute paid by the 
Rajah of Loonawara. In 1824 a tribute of Rupees 12,000 was imposed 
(No. cm.) on the Barrea State by the British Government in return for its 
protection. This tribute was to be increased in proportion to the prosperity 
of the State, but in the year 1849 it was declared to be permanently fixed at 
Rupees 12,000, equivalent to Government Rupees 9,336-4. In 1865 the 
Barrea tribute was charged with a payment of Rupees 6,406-12-9 on 
account of the escort of the Political Agent and the cost of establishments 
at the police stations of Sonkheda and Pandoo. In 1868 it was resolved that 
the tribute should be wholly expended for the benefit of the territory of Barrea 
and its vicinity and that the accumulated balance should be formed into a local 
fund. Out of this fund the expense of that portion of the Godra and Dohud 
road, connecting Guzerat and Central India, which passes through the Barrea 
State has been defrayed. To the annual amount. Rupees. 2,929-7-3, available 
from the tribute has been added that payable to the Rajah by the British 
Government, making a total of Rupees 7,074-6-4, out of which repairs to the 
road are defrayed, the surplus being formed into a road fund over which 
the Political Agent will retain control after the management of the State is 
entrusted to the Rajah. 

An Engagement (No. CIV.) was also made with the Rajah in 1824 
for the payment of Rupees 6,000 a year in addition to the tribute for the 



* No copies of these Engagements can now be found, 
t See Vol. III., page 314. 



Rewa Kanta Agency— Chota Oodeypore or Mohun. 255 

maintenance of a local force. But like the similar engagements* whict were 
concluded at the same time with the neighbouring Chiefs of Doongurpore and 
Banswarra it was never acted on, and in 1826 was declared obsolete. 

On the death of Gunga Dass in August 1819, before the birth of his 
son, Pirthee Raj, his Ranee had adopted two sons, one of whom was placed in 
power by Bheem Sing, the minister. But he was afterwards removed, and 
the rightful heir, Pirthee Raj, was restored. The State was greatly in debt, 
but arrangements were made under the guarantee of the British Government 
for the gradual liquidation of the debts, and, when the Rajah came of age, 
the direct supervision of the British Government was withdrawn. The Rajah 
was succeeded in February 1864 by his son, Man Sing, the present Chief, who 
is now twenty years of age. The State is under British management. 

Transit duties in the shape of a toll are levied in Barrea : Government 
during its management of tne State was unwilling to diminish this source 
of revenue, but restricted the amount to the average collections of former 
years, viz., Rupees 6,500 per annum. 

The area of Barrea is 813 square miles, the population 52,431, and the 
revenue Rupees 1,75,000. The military force of the State consists of 6 field 
guns, 35 cavalry, and 227 infantry and police. The Chief receives a salute 
of nine guns. 

Ckota Oodeypore or Molmn. — This family is descended in the elder line 
from the common ancestor of the Barrea family. The State is tributary to 
the Gaekwar. Owing to a doubt whether the political control of Chota 
Oodeypore was transferred to the British Government in 1820 along with 
that of the petty States in Mahee Kanta, an Agreement (No. CV.) was 
made in 1822, by which the Gaekwar surrendered his control, and the State 
became subject to the British Government, paying under guarantee an annual 
tribute of Rupees 10,500, equivalent to Government Rupees 8,769-13-4 to 
the Gaekwar. 

Pirthee Raj, with whom the above engagement was made, was succeeded 
by Gooman Sing, and he by his nephew, Jeyt Sing, the present Chief, now 
in his forty-fourth year. 

The area of the State is 873 square miles, the population 62,913 souls, 
and the gross revenue Rupees 3,00,000. The militarj' force of the State con- 
sists of 2 field guns, 58 cavalry, and 287 infantry and police. He receives a 
salute of nine guns. 

* See Vol. III., pages 37 and 38. 



256 Bewa Kanta Agency— Loonawara. 

Loonawara. — The Chiefs of this family belong to the great Salunki 
clan of Rajpoots and claim descent from Sidh Eaj who ruled in Auhelwarra 
Patan. The first of their race who emerged from obscurity was Ver Bad 
Raj who established himself at Virpore in the 13th century. The first 
connection of the British Government wi-th this petty State was formed 
in 1803, when the British troops entered Scindia's possessions in Guzerat, 
A Guarantee (No. CVI.) of the protection of the British Government was 
given to the Rajah, and a Treaty (No. CVII.) was afterwards formed with 
him, by which he became tributary to the British Government. But 
on the change of policy adopted by Lord Cornwallis this Treaty was 
dissolved. 

Prom that time there was little intercourse with Loonawara till 1813, 
when a Settlement (No. GVIII.) of the Gaekvs^r's tributary claims was made 
for Rupees 7,001 a year, from which Rupees 1,000 were deducted. After the 
Pindaree war in 1819 an Engagement (No. CIX.) was mediated between 
Scindia and the Rajah Futteh Sing, by which the payment of Scindia's 
tribute of Babasabee Rupees 12,000, equivalent to Government Rupees 
10,653-6-11 a year, was guaranteed on condition that Scindia would not inter- 
fere directly or indirectly in the affairs of the State. The tribute is now 
payable to the British Government under the Treaty with Scindia of 12th 
December I860.* 

It also receives a sum of Government Rupees 733 from the Godra per- 
gunnah of the Panch Mehals. The amount was fixed in 1851 ; but no formal 
engagement was concluded on the occasion by the contracting parties, Scindia 
and Loonawara. 

Futteh Sing was succeeded by Dulput Sing, adopted by Futteh Sing's 
widow, and he in 1853 by Dulel Sing, a collateral heir appointed by Govern- 
ment. 

In 1866 the request of Dulel Sing, who had no family, that he might be 
permitted to adopt was granted on the understanding that the selection should 
meet with the approval of Government, and that such nuzzerana as might 
be deemed proper would be levied. Rajah Dulel Sing died in June 1867. 
He had expressed a wish to adopt Wukht Sing, son of A jeet Sing the nearest 

* See Vol. III., page 814. 



Rewa Kanta Agency— Soanth. 257 

collateral heir, and his widow was allowed to give effect to his wishes. 
A nuzzerana of one year's net revenue, deducting the tribute to the British 
Governmentj was levied on this occasion. During the minority of the present 
Chief, who is now fifteen years of age, the State is under British manage- 
ment. 

In 1869 a long-standing dispute between the States of Loonawara and 
Doongurpore under the Meywar Agency relative to the possession of the 
villages of Kankeylee and Dholekankra was settled in favour of the former 
State. Against this decision the Doongurpore Durbar appealed, but after full 
enquiry the award was confirmed by the British Government and the village* 
were transferred to the Rewa Kanta Agency. 

The area of the State is about 388 square miles, and the population 
74,813 souls; the revenue amounts to Rupees 1,35,000, but about one-third 
has been alienated in free gift and in service or other tenures. The Chief 
receives a salute of nine guns. The military force of the State consists of 11 
afield and 4 other guns, 43 cavalry, and 201 infantry and police : .these troops 
are employed principally on civil duties. 

Soanth. — This family belongs to the Puar caste of Rajpoot and is 
believed to have come originally from Oojein, to have settled afterwards at 
Jhallode, and finally, about the thirteenth century, at Soanth. A Treaty (No. 
ex.) was concluded with this State in 1803, but it was subsequently dis- 
solved by the policy of Lord Cornwallis, which was adverse to the system of 
alliances with the petty Rajpoot Chiefs. The Chief of Soanth was included 
in the Engagement (No. CIX.) mediated between Scindia and Loonawara, 
and the payment of his tribute of Rupees 7,000, equivalent to Government 
Rupees 6,108-5-5, was guaranteed to Scindia on condition of the latter 
abstaining from all interference in the affairs of the State. It is now paid to 
the British Government under the cessions of the Treaty with Scindia dated 
12th December I860.* 

Soanth receives from the village of Goraroo under Jhallode, one of the 
pergunnahs of the Panch Mehals, Salim Sahee Rupees 50, equivalent to 
Government Rupees 38-8-7, as chouth. This sum was fixed in 1848 by the 
Political Agent in Rewa Kanta and the Assistant in Meywar, but no formal 
paper was drawn up. Soanth is also entitled to a sirpao of Government 
Rupees SO-8-8 fixed by Sir J. Malcolm in a,d. 1819. 



» See Vol. III., page 314. 
IV 33 



258 Rewa Kanta Agency— Balasinore. 

For some years a bad feeling existed between the Chief of Soanth and 
the Thakoor of Kuddana, who are both descended from a common ancestor, 
the former claiming a right to interfere in the Thakoor's choice of an heir 
principally on the ground that Kuddana was a feudatory of. Soanth and had 
always owed fealty to the Chief of that State. The evidence adduced by the 
Rajah was inconelusivej and in 187 1 the Bombay Government declared Knddana 
to be independent of Soanth. 

The late Chief, Bhowan Sing, died without issue in 1872, leaving as it was 
alleged a will by which he designated Prithee Sing, one of his Bhayad as 
his successor. Enquiiy showed that the alleged will could not be regarded 
as a record of the wishes and intentions of the late Chief, and that Prithee 
Sing was neither a fit person nor the nearest of kin. As the British Govern- 
ment was desirous that the State should be continued in the person of some 
fit successor, the widow of the late Chief was allowed to select one from 
amongst the collaterals. Her choice fell upon Pertab Sing and was 
confirmed by the British Government. Nuzzerana of a year's revenue was 
levied from Soanth. The present Chief is sixteen years of age. 

A British oflScer has been appointed to the control of the police in Barrea, 
Loonawara, and Soanth, his salary being defrayed in equal proportions by the 
three States. He is ex-officio Assistant to the Political Agent. 

The area of Soanth is 394 square miles, the population 49,675, and the 
revenue Rupees 80,000. The military force of the State consists of I field 
and 2 other guns, 22 cavalry, and 215 infantry and police. The Chief receives 
a salute of nine guns. 

Balasinore. — This family is descended from Sirdar Mahomed Khan, the ' 
elder son of Bahadoor Khan who was ninth in descent from Sher Khan Babee. 
From Bahadoor Khan's younger son, Mohahut Khan, springs another branch 
of the family, represented by the Nawab of Joonagurh in Kattiawar. 
Sirdar Mahomed Khan was succeeded in possession of the districts of 
Balasinore and Veerpore by his son, Jameut Khan, and he by his son, Salabut 
Khan. Salabut Khan died in May 1820, and was succeeded by his cousin, 
Abid Khan. 

Balasinore became tributary both to the Peishwa and Gaekwar. At the 
general settlement (No. XXXI.) of Mahee Kanta the tribute of the 
Gaekwar was settled at Rupees 4,001, since commuted to Government Rupees 
3,601-2-7. When the British Government succeeded to the Peishwa's rights, 
Balasinore came under its political jurisdiction. The State pays a tribute of 



Rewa Kanta Agency— Balasinore. 259 

Rupees 11,079-4-9 to the BritisK Government. In 1832 Abid Khan was 
removed and Edul Khan, his brother, was placed in power in his stead. He 
died in December 1831 and was succeeded by the present Chief, Zorawur 
Khan, now forty-nine years of age. 

In 1820 an Engagement (No. CXI.) was made with the Babee for the 
introduction of the British opium regulations into his territories. 

The pergunnah of Veerpore which consists of 42 villages was for long 
a bone of contention between the Chiefs of Loonawara and Balasinore. The 
Loonawara family fettled at Veerpore about the middle of the 12th century 
and removed to Loonawara three centuries latei:. In the middle of the 17th 
century Veerpore was wrested from them by the Balasinore family, but the 
conquest was never complete and both Chiefs levied revenue and exercised 
jurisdiction in certain villages, Loonawara paying a tribute of Syassye Rupees 
2,468-8 to Balasinore. In 1852 on the transfer of Balasinore to the Rewa 
Kanta Agency from the CoUectorate of Kaira the pergunnah was placed 
under attachment, both Chiefs being allowed to make their own arrangements 
under supervision, while jurisdiction, civil and criminal, was to be exercised by 
the Balasinore officials. 

In 1868 advantage was taken of Loonawara being under British manage- 
ment to settle the question. It was found that during the preceding twelve 
years Balasinore had received Rupees 1,55,152, while Loonawara had only 
received Rupees 23,929. It was therefore determined, in preference to a 
rateable division of the land between the States, to make over the pergunnah 
"to Balasinore on the conditions that the Chief should remit the tribute payable 
by Loonawara, relinquish all claims to jurisdiction within Loonawara limits, 
and accept as compensation for any huks which he might possess in Loonawara 
villages an annual compensation to be fixed by Government. He was also to 
respect all grants of land in Veerpore made by Loonawara and to purchase 
at a valuation any lands mortgaged by Loonawara to individuals. Landholders 
owing service to Loonawara were to continue to give that service under penalty 
of attachment and sale of their lands, the proceeds being paid to Loonawara 
and the lands made over to Balasinore. 

The Babee is entitled to Girass huks in the Kaira CoUectorate as follows :— 

Bs. a. p. 
Fixed item on Government villages ... 3,242 2 8 

Average of fluctuating ditto . . . 345 4 2 

He is also entitled to levy produce in kind from the village of Rojooa. 



260 



Eewa Kanta Agency— Petty Chiefs. 



The revenues o£ Balasinore are about Rupees 80,000, the population 
41,984, and the area 189 square miles. 

The Nawab who exercises 2nd class jurisdiction keeps up a force of 
53 cavalry, and 210 infantry who are employed for police purposes. He 
has 4 field guns. He receives a salute of nine guns. 

Petty Chiefs. — The province of Rewa Kanta is inhabited for the most 
part by Bheels, Mewassees, and other turbulent tribes. With these tribes, 
which are subject to Rajpeepla and the Gaekwar, and also with those in 
Scindia's Panch Mehals, agreements were made between the yeara 1822 and 
1826 with a view to the settlement of the country. The nature of these 
engagements will be sufficiently apparent from the specimens given (Nos. 
CXII. to CXV.). Seindia's Panch Mehals were ceded to the British Govern- 
ment by the Treaty of 13th December 1860, and have been attached to the 
Kaira CoUectorate. Most of the Mewassee Chiefs on the Nerbudda are 
Mutsullums or descendants of Hindoos, forcibly converted to the Moslem 
faith during the time of the Mahomedan supremacy. 

The following is a list of the petty Chiefs, showing the tribute they pay :— 



Name of State or plaee 
of residence, - 


Name and Caste of Chief. 




Cm £ 


Is 





To whom paid. 






"S 


° § 


si 


C3 








CD 


S i 




^ 








_L 


< 


h" 


g 




Kuddana ... 


Thakoor Parwat Singjoe 


63 


130 


10,000 




Pays no tribute. 


Sanjell 


Thakoor Pertab Singjee 


29 


33i 


6,100 




Ditto Not feuda- 
tory of Barrea. 


Gad 


Bana Bharat Singjee ... 


46 


134 


12,700 


600 


Feudatory of the Ka- 
jahof ChotaOodey- 


Bhadarwa ... 


Bana Sirdar Singjee 


63 


27 


38,900 


19,076 - 


pore. 


Umeta 


Barrea Hatiiee Singjee ... 


52 


36i 


29,300 


5,000 




Wajiria 


Thakoor Kalubawa 


40 


10 


26,700 


6,007 




Maadwa ... 


Eana Khoman Singjee ... 


30 


7 


35,600 


2,215 




Shanor 


Bana KhooBhal Singjee ... 


41 


3i 


10,000 


1,678 




HaBwadi ... 


Thakoor Bheem Singjee... 


43 


8 


12,000 


1,691 




Palasni 


Thakoor Jeit Singjee ... 


13 


64 


6,100 


2,131 




Bhilodia ... 


Chavda Eai Singjee and Haribawa 


25 


S 


9,000 


2,426 




TTcliaa ,„ 


Daima Jitaraia 


30 


4 


9,000 


883 




( 


Eathore Nathoo Klian ... 








Gaekwar Govern- 




Bathore Kalnbawa 


33/ 








• ment. 


Nangam .., ... ■< 


Bathore Sirdar Khan ... 
Bathore Sadabawa 


26 f 
66j 


If 


2,000 


1,294 




WaBan Virpur 


Daima Jitabawa 


65 


1\ 


8,000 


432 




Wasau Sewada 


Bathore Kalnbawa 
Gori Bhaibawa 
Gori Sadabawa 


60 
26 N 
60/ 


3i 


5,000 


1,161 




Chudesar.,, 


Gori Eahim Khan 


45 [ 










Gori Avafbhai ... ",', 


36 ( 


H 


800 


311 




^ 


Gori Chandbha 


30 \ 










Gori Kalnbawa ... '.], 


61 J 











Eewa Kanta Agency— Petty Chiefs. 



201 



Name oC State or place 
of residence. 


Name and Caste of Chief. 




.g 
si 






To whom paid. 






CtH 


= S 


■§ 








O 


.„ Ed 


S 4} 


ti 




' 




a 


is 


|S 


.a 








< 


< 


w" 


§ 






Daima Bhadarbaw a 


62- 


\ 










DaimaAlibhai 


45 


1 










Daima Jorabawa 


46 


f 








Bengan ... 


Daima Hetambawa 
Daima Natboo Khan ... 
Daima Bapuji 
Daima Bhadardin 


22 
26 
44 
26 


1- i 


500 


461 




( 


Daima Jitbhai 
Tbakrani Fulba 


12/ 

60 










EamsollMoti ... i 


Gori Motabawa 


14- 


I c 


1,100 


129 




C 


Gori Basool Ehan 


46 


4 


600 


127 




Eamsoli Nhani 


Ditto Ditto 






Jiral 


Ditto Ditto 




> c 


1,596 


77 




Aiwa 


Chohan Alum Khan ... 


46' 


3 


6.600 


67 


.Gaekwar '. Govern- 


Virampoora... 


_Pathau Natboo Khan ... 


22 


4 


700 


103 


ment. 


Nalia ... i 

Agar ... ,; 
Wohora ... [., 


Gori Alum Khan 
Gori Khushalbawa 


30- 
22. 


\ i 


600 


87 




Chohan Sirdar Khan ... 


28 


9 


11,600 


186 




Kalubawa 


46 


2 


6,000 


862 




DhamaBia ... \[[ 


Chohan Kalubawa 


42 


6 


4,000 


133 




Siudhiapara 


Chohan Jitabawa 


26 


2| 


2,600 


57 




Budhpar ... "* 


Bathore Umedbawa 


62 


3| 


300 


36 




diorangla ... 


Bawal Bam Sing 


30 


2,400 


96 




Bihora ... \", 


Bathore Sirdarbawa 
Chavda Abbe Sing 


22 
60> 


f 


800 


61 




Eaicpoora „. . 


Chavda Anopbawa 
Chavda Antolbawa 


66 
42 


" 2J 


4,100 


1,422 




Garol 


Chavda Sujanbawa 


41> 







30 


Transferred to Panch 
Mehals. Tribute is 
paid to Gaekwar 


Pandu ,., ^ 


Khanzada Nathoo Khan 


26> 








through Eewa 


Khanzada Ahmed Khan ' 


20 








Kanta Agency. 


Khanzada Dosu Khan ... 
Khanzada Manaoor Khan 


46 
70 


91 


3,100 


44501 ■ 




1 
Chhaliar ... ... 


Khanzada Akbar Khan., , 


41 










Khanzada Zorawar Khan 


11> 










Bawal Drigpal Singjee ... 


19 


g 


10,000 


3,401 




Sihora ... 


Suda Pai-mar Nar Singj ee 
Pagi Bajjibhai 


42 
70-1 


14 


16,000 


4,801 




Meyli ,.. '. 


PagiAda 
Pagi Dapa ... 
PagiMadhu... • ... 


40 
66 
48 J 


. 6 


2,200 


1,601 






Barrea Kesar Sing 
Barrea Deep Sing 
Barrea Naranbhai 


40> 

18 

30 










Kanoda .... 


Barrea Goolab Sing 
Barrea Bhowanbhal 
Barrea Bhopat Sing 
Barrea Dalubbai 


50 
32 
26 

80 


- 3i 


2,200 


1,601 






Barrea Walbhai 
BanaNagji 


50^ 
36N 








Gaekwar Govern- 
ment. 




Bana Himmat Sing 


30 










EanaW^a 


26 










Poicha 


Bana Lalbhai 
Bana Pathibhai 
Bana Jusabhai 


36 
40 
55 


> 3 


2,000 


1,601 




/ : 


Bana Chundur Sing 


SOj 










Bathore Nahar Sing 


26> 










Itwad 


Bathore Amar Sing 
Bathore Jusabhai 
Bathore Kabhai 
Eawul Nathubhai 
Bawul Sheo Sing 


40 
60 
25/ 
30> 

40 


. 45 


1,000 


601 




Dhari 


Eawul Sahib Sing 
Eawul Jewatbhai 
Bawul Mokambhai 


16 
28 
401 


• 2J 


2,600 


951 






Bawul Jorbhai 


63> 










Moka Paginu Miivvada. 


PagiGambhai 
Pagi Garbad 


601 
60 J 


i 


250 


126 





262 



Bewa Kanta Agency— Petty Chiefs. 



Name of State or 
of residence. 


place 


Name and Caste of Chief, 




ii 






To whom paid. 








■s 




■11 


1 










^ 


1" 


w" 


S 






( 


Barrea Jetbbai- 


HS-s 










Amrapore 




Barrca Amar Sing 
Barrea Mulchum 
Barrea Goolab Sing 
Kotwal Bhala 


28 ( 
30 C 
35) 
25-s 


li 


825 


201 




Litar Gotra 


( 


KotwalAda 
Kotwal Girdhar 
Kotwal Entna, &c, 
Pagi Jethhai 


36/ 

22 r 

27^ 


ij 


330 


201 




Jesar.., 


( 


Pagi Odhar 
Pagi Khatoo 
Pagi Amar Sing 
Pagi Haribhal 


38 f 
65) 


14 


275 


161 




Kasla Paginu 3 


Pagi Zera 


40i 


ij 


125 


65 




Muwadu. 


\ 


Pagi Bhathi 
Pagi Adey Sing 
Rathore Pathibhai 


50j 










Warnoli moti 




60 


1 


300 


101 




Bajpore 




Bawal Soor Sing 


18 


1 


260 


61 




Warnolmal 
Zamkha 


..,•( 


Barrea Jey Sing 
Barrea Abhe Sing 
Barrea Bechar Sing 


22-) 
30 j 
40 


2 


1,200 
1,200 


85 
61 


Gaekwar Govern- 
ment. 




•■■{ 


Kawal Dajibhai 


45-) 
50 C 
40j 








Waktapore 


Bawal Eanohood 


1 


600 


151 






Bawal Beeharbhai 










Nahara 


( 


Barrea Kalan 
Barrea Je Sing 
Pagi Satu 


30} 
22 j 
fO-v 


li 


400 


26 




Gotardi 


A 


Pagi Euttun Sing 
Pagi*Bechar 
Pagi Moka 
Bughnath 


40/ 

35J 
40>, 


H 


600 


426 






BharatSing 


30/ 










Anghad 


^ 


Nathubawa 
Ram Sing 
Parbhat Sing 
Kesri Sing 


32 f 
42 f 
24 \ 
12; 


2 


3,400 


1,747 




Baeka 


... 1 


Jesingbawa 
Gunput Eao, &0, 
Patel Aju 


isi 

35) 
46-1 
30 [■ 


24 


2,700 


6751 




Bodka 


Patel Jiwa 
PatclWahala 


n 


2,200 


1,1044 




Pantalaori 


f Nathoo Khan 
•■• (. Naair Khan 


40) 
44j 


64 


8,000 


201^ '' 


to the Rajah of Eaj- 
peepla direct. 



Rewa Kanta Agency— Suttee— No. XCVII. 263 

No. XCVII. 

Translation of a Note from A. Eemington, Esq., Officiating 1st Assistant Poli- 
tical CoMMissioNEE and Resident at Baeoda, to the address of the following 
Rulers of the different States placed under his Political Supeeintendence, dated 
3rd April 1840, viz.— 

To Maheavul Gooman SingjeEj of Oodeypore. 
To ditto PiRTHEERAjJBE, of Deogui'h Barria. 
To Mahakanah Futtbh SingjeEj of Loonawara. 
To Ranah Bhowany Singjeb, of Soanth. 
To Thakook Jalxjm Singjee, of Bhadurwah. 
To ditto SiEDAK Sing, of Wankaneer. 
To Mahakanah Verisaljee, of Rajpeepla. 

Under instructions received from the Resident of Baroda, conveyed to 
me in his letter, dated 11th March 1840, I write to inform you that it having 
come to the notice of that officer that a Pritish subject born in Rutnagherry, 
but residing at Baroda, died, and his widow immolated herself in observance 
of the rite of suttee, which the Guikwar government took no measures to 
prevent, the Political Commissioner addressed a note to His Highness depre- 
cating the occurrence, and suggesting that as the British Government had, after 
full consideration, abolished the rite of suttee in its own territory. His Highness 
should introduce a similar arrangement within his own, to which His Highness 
replied that, according to the request of the Resident, he would cause proper 
arrangement to be made, and this concurrence being communicated to govern- 
ment, it was pleased to declare that no act could have been performed more 
acceptable to it than the abolition of suttee. I beg to state that it appears 
to me advisable you should take measures to prohibit the practice in your 
own State, in respect to which, as the British Government are most intent 
on the speedy abolition of this rite, you will have the goodness, after full 
consideration of the above, to favour me with a reply. 

(Sd.) A. Remington, 
Offf. Isi Asst. PoUl. Commr. 



Teanslation of a Note addressed by Maheavul Gooman Singjee to A. Remington, 
Esq., Officiating 1st Assistant Political Commissionee for Guzeeat and Resi- 
dent at Baeoda, dated Cheiter Vud 5th, Sumbut 1896. 

After recapitulation of the contents of the note addressed by the Officiat- 
ing 1st Assistant Political Commissioner on the. subject of the a,rrangements 
made by the Guikwar government to abolish th€ rite of suttee in its territories 
on the 3rd April 1840, the Mahravul states as follows :— Having taken into 



264 



Bewa Kanta Agency— Suttee— No. XCVII. 



consideration the subject brought to my notice regarding the abolition of 
suttee, I shall, agreeably to the suggestion contained in your notCj enjoin its 
discontinuance in the State of Oodeypore. 



Seal. 



Teanslation of a Note addressed by Maheavul Pietheeeaj jeb, of Deogtjeh Baeeia, to 
A. Remington, Esq., Officiating 1st Assistant Political Commissionee for 
GuzEEAT, dated Cheiter Vud 11th, Sumbut 1896. 

Having taken into consideration the subject brought to my notice regard- 
ing the abolition of suttee, I shall enjoin its discontinuance in my towns 
and villages and prohibit its future observance. 



Seal. 



Teanslation of a Note addressed by Mahe Anah Putteh Singjee, of Loonawaea, 
to A. Remington, Esq., Officiating 1st Assistant Political Commissionee for 
GuzBEAT, dated Cheiter Soodh 15th, Sumbut 1896. 

Having taken into consideration the subject brought to my notice regard- 
ing the abolition of suttee, I have, conformably thereto, issued a proclamation 
to inform the people residing in my districts, and will further make suitable 
arrangements in the matter. 



Seal. 



Teanslation of a Note addressed by Ran ah Bhowant Singjee, of Soanth, to A. Re- 
mington, Esq., Officiating 1st Assistant Political Commissionee for Guzeeat, 
dated 12th May 1840. 

Having taken into consideration the subject brought to my notice regard- 
ing the abolition of suttee, I will make arrangements in my territory to 
prohibit the future observance of suttee. 



Seal. 



Kewa Kanta Agency— Rajpeepla—ITo. XCVIII. 265 



Teanslation of a Note addressed by Thakooe Jalum Sino, of Bhaduewah, to A. Re- 
mington, Esq., Officiatino 1st Assistant Political Commissionee for Guzekat, 
dated Cheiter Soodh 7th, Sumbut 1896. 

Having' taken into consideration the subject brought to my notice regard- 
ing the abolition of suttee, I will, agreeably to the wishes of government, 
prohibit suttee in my territory. 

(Sd.) Jalum Sing. 



Teanslation of a Note addressed by Thakooe Siedae Sing, of Wankaneee, to 
A. Remington, Esq., Officiating 1st Assistant Political Commissionee for 
Guzeeat, dated Bysack Soodh 7th, Sumbut 1896. 

Having taken into consideration the subject brought to my notice regard- 
ing the abolition of suttee, I will prohibit the practice in my districts and 
make suitable arrangements for its discontinuance. 

(Sd.) Sirdar Sing. 



Teanslation' of a Note addressed by Mahaeanah Veeisaljee, of Rajpeepla, to 
A Remington, Esq., Officiating 1st Assistant Political Commissionee for 
Guzeeat, dated Bysack Soodh 8th, Sumbut 1896.* 

I have learnt the contents of your letter on the subject of the abolition 
of suttee with mucli pleasure, and shall make suitable arrangements to prohi- 
bit the practice within the districts of my State. 



Seal. 



No. XCVIII. 

SREE MHALSA KAUNT. 

Teanslation of a Peewannah from Anund Rao Guikwae Sena Khas Khetl Shumshee 
Bahadooe, to Rana Kooee Peetab Sing, of the Capjtal of Rajghue. 

After compliments. — Your father Ram Sing, of Rajghur, does not con- 
duct himself properly, and in consequence many quarrels exist, and .your 
inheritance is in danger of being lost to you. In consideration of this, the 
Sircar has thought proper to make arrangements that you be invested with 
IV " 84 



266 Eewa Kanta Agency— Rajpeepla— No. XCIX. 



inclusive authority to conduct the affairs of the State ; the same being deter- 
mined on, this perwannah is given to you. Your father Ram Sing is a man 
of bad conduct, and listening to bad counsels is planning means whereby to 
involve the welfare of the State ; wherefore you are invested with the execu- 
tive management of affairs. You are, however, to transact all business and 
execute all deeds in the name of Ram Sing. You are also to transact business 
by means of Risundass Buckshu, without whose knowledge 
you are to execute no public measure. You are likewise to 
institute such means as will preserve the ryots from suffering tyranny, and 
trouble, and to obey the Sircar, continuing to pay the Sircar its dues and 
claims according to existing agreement. 

You will also settle the debt owing to Myrab Narrain by your govern- 
ment. 

Moideen Jemadar being well disposed to your State, extend to him the 
same indulgence and protection in his services to your government. 

You will arrange respecting a provision for your father, and take such 
measures as will prevent him from exciting disturbances. 

Do you continue to conduct yourself as herein provided for: in any 
default in the administi-ation of affairs you cannot prosper. Consider this and 
act according to the letter of the Sircar, and you will suffer no unjust trouble 
from the Sircar, and in behalf of which, and consistent with justice, it has 
nominated Mr. Carnac on the part of the Honourable Company as guarantee. 

Done Sumhut 1866, Magh Fwd StA, Heigra 22nd, Mokurrum, correspond- 
ing with the English year 1816, '^Ith February. 

The Bombay Government agreed to guarantee these arrangements, but 
in consequence of the death of Ram Sing the guarantee was never actually 
affixed to the Sunnud. 



No. XCIX. 



TfiANSLATiON of an AaEEEMENT entered into by Mahaeanah Veeisaljeb, Eajah of 
Kajpbepla, and James Williams, Esq., Resident at Baboda, on the part of the 

HONOUEABLE COMPANY. 



Seal of the 
Bajah. 



My representation is as follows : — 

I have received possession of my country from the Guikwar government, 
but I am certain that without the aid of the British Government I shall not 
be able to make its settlement : therefore I myself and my father, both of 
us of our own desire, do agree to act upon every thing relating to the settle- 



Bewa Kanta Agency— Rajpeepla—Ifo. 0. 267 



ment of all the affairs of my country in conformity witli the advice of the 
Honourable Company. Whatever may be the desire of the government I 
will act according to it. In conformity with this agreement, whoever may 
be Chieftain of the country from generation to generation he will act. 

Dated Sumbut 1878 Assoondee, reckoning from the month of Assar Aswen, 
Soodi the \hth, corresponding with October the lith, A.D. 1821. 

Signature of the Rajah. 



No. C. 



Teanslation of a Bond signed and delivered to Goveenment by Mahaeanah Veeisal, 
Eajah of Rajpeepla, dated at Nandode, the lOth of Falgoon Soodh, Sumbut 1879, 
A.D. 20th February 1823. 

Contents. 

We have of our free will agreed to pay yearly at Baroda to the Guikwar 
goveyiment for yearly jummabundee and ghasdana the sum of Rupees (65,001) 
sixty-five thousand and one. 

The three villages in the Thanna of Roond, viz., 1st, Roofnd ; 2nd, 
Jehoor; 3rd, Kotara, and the zekaut (inland duties), and the five dumalla 
villages, Wurkavi, Poeecha, Washna Huddabhang, and Kokulpore, and 
Koond near Balode, and the sirpao yearly payable to us from the Guikwar 
government and the town of Burnn being all deducted, the sum total Rupees 
(65,001) sixty-five thousand and one is settled; the instalments to be paid in 
the months of Pous, Falgoon, Cheiter, and Bysaek. In this manner from 
generation to generation, year by year, the sums shall be made good under 
the mediation of the Honourable Company and no deviation occur. On all 
matters of the above mentioned talooka whatever discussion on matters good 
or bad may arise, these shall be referred to the mediation of the Honourable 
Company, and we shall remain satisfied therein, nor shall there ever be a 
departure from this agreement. This we have written and signed. 



Teanslation of a Geant of yearly allowances from the Rajah Veeisal of Rajpeepla) to 
Ranee Suettjeeoovee Bhaee, dated at Nandode, the 10th Falgoon Soodh, Sumbut 
1879, A. D. February 20th, 1823. 

To Surujeeoover Bhaee, Maharana Verisal, Rajah of Rajpeepla,. has 
written and delivered : the illustrious Guikwar government and the Honour- 
able British Government having in the performance of justice decided the 
sovereignty of Rajpeepla to be ours, and in their beneficence conferred entirely 
the honour on us, therefore we bestow upon you and on Pertab Sing and 



268 Eewa Kanta Agency— Eajpeepla— No. CI. 



others under your protection a yearly gift at tlie rate of Rupees (700) seren 
hundred per month, total Rupees (8,400) eight thousand four hundred, as 
follows : — for your private expenses Rupees (300j two hundred per month, 
yearly Rupees (2,400) two thousand four hundred, and Wulligaom, in the 
Kuntaul pergunnah, and Syaligaum, in the Ruttunpore pergunnah ; whatever 
produce is derivable from these towns is yours and the towns delivered to you, 
and this monthly allowance and the produce of the towns remains yours for 
life; and for Pertab Sing and the rest a monthly allowance of Rupees (500) 
five hundred shall be regularly given, making a yearly total of Rupees (6,000) 
six thousand ; at the rate of Rupees (8,400) eight thousand four hundred a 
year, as it has been agreed upon and engaged to you so shall it be given, and 
do you continue to go on as you have written to us ; in this matter no changes 
shall occur ; this we have written and signed. 



To Maharanah Varisal, Rajah of Rajpeepla, Ram Sorajeear Bhye 
writes : — I am content to receive the yearly allowance and provision made 
for me and Pertab Sing and others under my protection through the media- 
tion of the Guikwar government and by Mr. Williams on behalf of the 
British Government, and will remain satisfied, nor have I any further (jlaims 
whatever for myself or for Pertab Sing on the above mentioned territory or 
the government thereof ; thus have I written and signed. 



No. CI. 



Tkanslation of an Ageeement entered into by Mahaeanah Vaeisal, Rajah of Raj- 
peepla, on 26th November 1823. 

Formerly a dispute existed regarding the right to the guddee of my 
chieftainship, on which account the two great Sircars of Shreemunt Guikwar 
Sena Khas Kheyl Shumsher Bahadoor and the Honourable Company Ungrez 
Bahadoor having investigated the same decided my claim to be just, confirmed 
it, and delivered over to me the chieftainship. On this account I, of my own 
understanding and free will and pleasure, subscribe to the under-written _ 
Articles of Agreement for my good behaviour : — 

Aeticle 1. 
On the above-mentioned chieftainship are debts due to the Guikwar 
Sircar and to others. I have not means to bear the whole of this burthen, 
which is known to the Sircar. But whatever order I shall receive from the 
Resident at Baroda on the part of the Honourable Company to adopt any 
plan for the liquidation of the Guikwar debt, I will agree to, and act in 
conformity with the same. 



Rewa Kanta Agency— Bajpeepla— No. CI. 269 



Whatever proportion of the resources of the State may be fixed to defray 
the expenses of the State at any time by the advice of the Resident, and an 
order given upon the subject, in conformity with it I will abide. In this 
1 will make no difference. 

Article 2. 

A separate bond has been given regarding the annual ghasdana and 
jummabundee to be paid to the Guikwar government, according to which I 
will pay the sum. If in any year an Asmanee or Sultanee misfortune should 
really occur, then the Sircar, out of compassion, will make a remission in the 
tribute of that year according to the custom of the country. 

Article 3. 

The Company's Sircar has stationed in the above chieftainship a detach- 
ment of its sepoys for my protection. For the expenses of the same in 
whatever manner the Sircar may direct, I will agree, and pay. in conformity 
with the same. 

Article 4. 

The Bheels and Mewassees of the above talook shall not commit any 
disturbances in the districts of the Guikwar to the north and south of the 
river Nerbudda, nor in .the Khaseh districts of the Honourable Company, or in 
their dependencies. I will keep the arrangements with them binding. In 
the above province from every village fael zamin security has been taken for 
its good behaviour. If any village has been omitted, security shall be taken 
from it and a proper settlement be kept. If any disturbance or injury is 
sustained, and the same should be proved against any of the inhabitants of my 
province, I will answer for the same, or cause an answer to be given for it. 

Article .5. 
I will not harbour nor allow any one to harbour in my talook disturbers 
of the public peace, Mewassees, the criminals of both governments,' and 
Bharwutteeas. I will not, nor shall any other person, associate with them. 

Article 6. 
I will not commit acts of aggression against any one. If any dispute 
arises between me and any other talookdar or zemindar, I will make the same 
known to the Company's Sircar, and whatever order it may give respecting it 
I will abide by. 

Article 7. 
No one shall molest travellers passing and repassing through the limits 
of my talooks. I will take care that a proper settlement is made on this 
point. 



270 



Rewa Kanta Agency— Bajpeepla—M"o. CII. 



Aeticle 8. 

In the above province reside Rajpoots and Grassias, who possess Geeras 
rights upon the Company's districts in the zillahs of Baroach and Surat. 
Regarding these, papers of agreement were taken from them by Mr. 
Willoughby, Assistant to the Resident. Whatever final settlement of these 
may be made in conformity with the same I will cause them to abide. 

Article 9. 

In conformity with the order of the Company's Sircar, opium shall not 
be clandestinely conveyed within the limits of my province by any merchants 
or travellers concealed in any other merchandize without the seal and order of 
the Sircar. I will keep a good arrangement in this respect in my talook. If 
any opium is clandestinely conveyed I will seize it, and make the same known 
to the Sircar; whatever order the Sircar may give relating to the opium 
arrangements I will abide by. 

In conformity with the above written nine Articles I will always act 
from generation to generation ; if in this respect any difference arises, I will 
answer for the same. My talook is security for my acting in conformity to 
what is written above. What is written is true. 



Rajah's Seal 

and 
signature. 



No. CII. 

TEANSLiTiON of an AsEEBMENT passed by Mahaeanah Sheee Vaeisaljee, Rajah of 
Rajpebpla, to His Highness Gunput Rao Guikwae, dated Sumwut 1909, Kartick 
Wud 1st, Saturday, corresponding with 28th November 1852. 



Seal. 



After compliments. — I am a half sharer in some of the villages under 
the Roond pergunnah, in consequence of which the ryots and other causes 
give rise to constant disputes. With a view to avoid the same, I begged the 
Sircar, . through Kamdar Dhuneshwur Wishwanath, to make over to my 
management those villages in the said pergunnah over some of which your 
Highness possessed half and on others entire jurisdiction, as well as the cus- 
tom Nakas at Nandode and other places, with sole authority over them, in 
lieu of which I would pay the Sircar annually a sum to be fixed by your 
Highness; that I would give up to your Highness my right of criminal 
administration, &e., over the village of Kurnalee, which at present is divided 



Bewa Kanta Agency— Rajpeepla— No. Oil. 271 



between me and the Sircar, and your Highness should therefore fix an amount 
equal to my half share in the village, and the same should be deducted from 
that sum which the Sircar should fix to be received from me for the villages 
now in the Sircar's possession, and the remainder would annually be given by 
me to the Sircar. This request of mine the Sircar was pleased to accede to, 
and I thereupon enter into this agreement, the conditions of which are as 
follows : — 

Akticle 1. 

I have given over to the Sircar to their entire management my half share 
of jurisdiction in matters of criminal administration, &c., over the village of 
Kurnalee, and I have now therefore no right whatever in the jurisdiction, &c., 
of the village, except that I am only to receive annually a sum on account of 
the revenues of my half share, and which by taking the average of ten years' 
receipts is fixed at Rupees 575-8-0. This will be deducted from the fixed 
amount of the revenues of those of the villages in the Roond pergunnah which 
the Sircar have given to me, and of which a detail is given in the following 
Article, and the balance will annually be paid by me to the Sircar. 

Article 3. 

A list of those of the villages in the Roond pergunnah over some of 
which half and on others entire jurisdiction has been exercised by the Sircar, 
and which your Highness has made over to my management with sole crimi- 
nal administration over them, as well as of the custom Nakas also given to 
me. 

Villages over which His Highness the Guihwar exercises entire jurisdiction. 

1, Thanna Roond; 2, Mouza Kotara; 3, Jeyore; 4, Bhurna. 

Villages over which His Highness the Guihwar exercises half jurisdiction. 

1, Mouza Poeecha; 2, Vasua-Nana; 3, Roond, pergunnah Bhalode; 4, 
Kakulpore. 

Custom Nakas. 
1, pergunnah Nandode; 2, pergunnah Bhalode; 3, pergunnah Panethaj 
4. pergunnah Gowalee; 5, the custom derived at Ladba's Naka in the village 
of Kotara. 

Spirit Shops. 

I, Thanna Roond ; 2, Mouza Kotara. 

The above villages, custom Nakas, and spirit shops have, with the entire 
jurisdiction over them, been made over to me by the Sircar. _ By taking the 
average of ten years, including both civil and criminal receipts, the annual 
income thereof amounts to Rupees 14,187 ; from this is to be deducted the 
revenues of my half share of Kurnalee, as stated in the 1st Article, amount- 
ing to Rupees 575-8-0 annually, and it leaves a balance of Rupees 13,611-8-0. 



272 Rewa Kanta Agency— Rajpeepla— No. CII. 



Out of this your Highness having kindly remitted Kupees 260-8-0, there 
remains a net balance of Rupees 13,351, which I will, without any objection or 
advancing a claim for remission on account of heavenly or earthly calamity, pay 
in one item on every Maha Soodh 1 6th.* To ensure a regular payment of the 
said amount I have obtained the Honourable Company's guarantee. The man- 
agement of the aforesaid villages will be conducted by me in the same manner 
as was done by the Sircar. No new customs oppressive to the ryots will be 
introduced. The Sircar should pay the Huckdars and others the amounts of 
their respective bucks which may have been included in the above fixed sum. 
On the transfer to me by your Highness of the above-mentioned villages, the 
Sircar will cause marks to be laid down to distinguish the boundaries of 
your Highness' villages, so that no dispute may in future take place regard- 
ing land, and render it easy to conduct the management according to the 
boundaries so laid down. 

Aeticle 3. 

There are several mutual disputes existing regarding boundaries, also about 
lands and Geeras of the ryots; to effect a settlement of the same, the Sircar 
should depute a confidential Kamdar, who, in conjunction with one on my 
part, will, after examining the documentary proofs on both sides, as well as 
bearing in mind the past management, make proper arrangements, and when 
once the marks are laid down, there will not remain any more dispute. 

Article 4. 

No protection will ever be afforded in my territory to the Sircar's 
offenders. If land or other mutual disputes hereafter occur they will be settled 
by attending to the proofs and the existing management on both sides, and 
no disputes will be entertained without any just cause. 

Akticle 5. 

Whatever direction the high roads usually take after passing the Nakas 
the Sircar have entrusted to me, will hereafter be continued. If it is usual 
for the goods to pass to and from the Sircar's territory through the above 
Nakas, I shall never, with the intention to shut up those roads, form new 
ones in my territory, and if the Sircar's Nakas suffer by my doing so, I will 
pay the loss that may be done. 

The above is agreed to. 

Sumwui 1909, Karticic Wwdlst, Saturday. 

In the Rajah's hand-writing. 

Signed as. above my own signature. 



Seal. 



* This date will occur either in February or March. 



Eewa Kanta Agency— Deogurh Barrea— No. CIII. 273 



Endorsement ly the Resident. 

The above agreement has been passed by the Eajpeepla Rajah to the 
Guikwar government. According to the 2nd Article thereof, the above 
Rajah agrees to pay a sum of Rupees 13,351 to the Guikwar. A letter No. 
5006 of the 12th November 1852 has been received from the Bombay Gov- 
ernment regarding a guarantee to the above arrangement. The guarantee of 
the Honourable Company regarding the above Rupees 13,351 is hereby given. 

(Sd.) J. M. Davibs, 
Dated Baroda, Ind December 1852. Resident, 



No. CIII. 



Agebement between the Beitish Goveenmbnt and Mahaeaj Pietheebaj, Eajah of 
Baekia, his heh-s and successors, concluded, in March 1824, by Captain A. Macdonald 
on the ■part of the Beitish Goveenment and by Eawul Jbejeebhaeb, on the part 
of the Bajah of Babeia. 

Article 1. 

The Rajah Pirtheeraj having agreed to pay the British Government an 
annual tribute for its protection, will make no delay or evasion in fulfilling 
his engagement. 

Aeticle 2. 

The British Government, in consideration of the debts of the petty State 
of Barria, will accept the sum of Shalim Shaee Rupees 12,000 annually 
as tribute for six years, from the year Sumwut 1880 (corresponding with A. D. 
1823-24) to Sumwut 1886 (corresponding with a. d. 1829-30.) 

Akticle 3. 

This tribute shall be paid by' instalments as follows :— 

For the year Sumwut 1880 (a. d. 1823-24), Shalim Shaee Rupees 12,000. 

First instalment, Shalim Shaee Rupees 6,000, to be paid in Assar Soodh, 
Sumwut 1881 (corresponding with July 1824). 

Second instalment, Shalim Shaee Rupees 6,000, to be paid in Kartick 
Soodh, Sumwut 1881 (or November 1824). 

For the year Sumwut 1881 (a. d. 1824-25), Shalim Shaee Rupees 
12,000. 

First instalment, Shalim Shaee Rupees 6,000", to be paid in A-ssar Soodh, 
Sumwut 1882 (corresponding with July 1825). 

Second instalment, Shalim Shaee Rupees 6,000," to be paid in Kartick 
Soodh, Sumwut 1882 (or November 1825). 

IV ^^ 



274 Eewa Kanta Agency— Deogurh Barrea— No. CIV. 

For the year Sumwut 1882 (a. d. 1825-26), Shalim Shaee Rupees 
12,000. 

First instalment, Shalitn Shaee Rupees 6,000, to be paid in Assar Soodh, 
Sumwut 1883 (corresponding with July 1826). 

Second instalment, Shalim Shaee Rupees 6,000, to be paid in Kartiek 
Soodh, Sumwut 1883 (corresponding with November 1826). 

For the year Sumwut 1883 (a. d. 1826-27), Shalim Shaee Rupees 12,000, 

First instalment, Shalim Shaee Rupees 6,000, to be paid in Assar Soodh 
Sumwut 1884 (corresponding with July 1827). 

Second instalment, Shalim Shaee Rupees 6,000, to be paid in Kartiek 
Soodh, Sumwut 1884 (corresponding with November 1827). 

For the year Sumwut 1884 (a. d. 1827-28) Shalim Shaee Rupees 12,000. 

First instalment Shalim Shaee Rupees 6,000, to be paid in Assar Soodh, 
Sumwut 1885 (or July 1828). 

Second instalment, Shalim Shaee Rupees 6,000, to be paid in Kartiek 
Soodh, Sumwut (or November 1828). 

For the year Sumwut 1885 (a. d. 1828-29), Shahm Shaee Rupees 12,000. 

First instalment, Shalim Shaee Rupees 6,000, to be paid in Assar Soodh, 
Sumwut 1886 (corresponding with July 1829). 

Second instalment, Shalim Shaee Rupees 6,000, to be paid in Kartiek 
Soodh, Sumwut 1886 (or November 1829). 

Article 4. 

After the expiration of the period above mentioned, the tribute shall be 
increased in proportion to the amount of the revenues. 



Mahatiaj Shuee Pirthebraj Gungadasjee, 
in the hand-writing of Rawul Jee- 
JEEBHAEE. What is stated above is 
binding. 



Kawul 
Shree Pirtheeraj 

Gungadasjee, 
constant servant 

of Sree Ram. 



Confirmed by the Governor General in Council on the 20th April 1824. 



No. CIV. 

Signature of Jeejebbhabe Kamdae. 
Engagement entered into by Eaja Piethee Sing, of Baeeia, and Kamdae Eawul 
Jbejeebhaee with Captain Alexandee Macdonald on the part of the Honoueable 
Company. 

I agree of my own free will to pay to the Honourable Company without 
failure, exclusive of the fixed tanka, the sum of Rupees 500 per mensem, or 



Rewa Kanta Agency— Chota Oodeypore or Mohun— No. CV. 275 



Rupees 6,000 per annum, for the maintenance of the eavahy and infantry 
stationed with me for the protection of the country. Besides this sum the 
established tanka will be regulary paid by instalments. The pay of the horse 
and foot, amounting' to Rupees 500 per mensem, to commence from the 1st 
January 1824, or Sumwut 1880. 



Bated ZU/i January 1824-. 



No. CV. 



Teanslation of an Asebement entered into by the Eajah of Chota Ottdetpoee, Kartick 
So6dh 7th, November 21st, 1822. 

The Rajah of Oudeypore acknowledges that under the protection of the 
Honourable Company's government he has subscribed to the yearly payment 
of ghasdana to the Guikwar government, and that the following are the 
Articles for regular'and systematic proceedings in future : — 

Akticle 1. 

The Bheels or Koolees of the aforesaid talooka shall in no ease commit 
any injury to the Sonkaira or Teelukwara or any other pergunnahs belonging 
to His Highness the Guikwar, or to any talooka or town under the protection 
of the Honourable Company. This engagement is to be kept most rigidly, 
and in case of any depredations being committed and proved, the Oudeypore 
Chieftain to answer accordingly. 

Aeticle 2. 
The irregular, quarrelsome Mewassees, disobeyers and rebels against 
government, incendiaries (Bharwuttea) and others of such character shall 
not be sheltered, nor allowed to be sheltered, in the Oudeypore pergunnuh, 
nor any assistance be aiforded them. 

Article 3. 

No private quarrels shall be allowed to be prosecuted ; but if any talookdar 
has any difEerence with any zemindar, the same shall be referred to the 
Honourable Company's government, and the decision thereupon be final. 

Akticlb 4. 
The public roads through the limits of the Oudeypore talooka shall 
be protected from all interruptions of commerce or risks of personal safety. 

Aeticle 5. 

It is most strictly agreed to for this talooka that, in conformity with the 

orders of government, no opium shall be allowed to be smuggled, without the 

seal and pass of the Honourable Company, in the baggage of any travelling 

merchants ; and if any opium is' found attempted to be smuggled, the said 



276 Kewa Kanta Agency— Chota Oodeypore or Mohun— Ifo. CV. 



opium stall be seized and reported to government and disposed of agreeably 
to the orders then received. These are the five Articles of agreement by 
which afEairs are in future to be guided, and in case of any breach of these 
engagements, the Oudeypore Chieftain binds himself to answer the claim. 



Teanslation of a Paper addressed to the Siecae by the Chieftain of OtrDETPOEE Eajah 
Eawul Pietheeeaj, dated Asoo Soodh lOth, Sumwud 1878, 28tli June 1822. 

Of my own free-will and inclination I have agreed to make good yearly 
and pay through the mediation of the British Government the sum of 
Rupees ten thousand five hundred (10,500) to the Guikwar government, in 
the same manner that this ghasdana has been hitherto paid in Baroda. From 
this agreement there shall be no departure, and every thing that concerns the 
above talooka, either good or bad, shall be transacted through the mediation 
of the British Government, and I will remain a servant of the Company ; 
nothing contrary to this shall be, done ; to this I affix my signature. 



Teansiation of the Peewannah given by His Highness Seeajee Eag Gttikwae Sena 
Khas Kheyl Shumsheee Bahadoob, to the Rajah of Maha Eawul Pietheeeaj, 
dated the 2nd of the 2nd Abso Vud, or 15th of the month of Suffer (October 31st, 1822). 

Ghasdana is due from you to the Baroda government, and it is agreed, 
under the mediation of the British Government and through the intervention 
of Mr. Williams, the Resident at Baroda, that the above to the amount of 
Rupees ten thousand five hundred yearly shall be paid by instalment as 
hitherto, and if at any time you suffer through the inclemency of seasons 
or foreign invasion, then the Baroda government shall exercise protection in 
the same manner that is agreed upon for Kattywar and Mahee Kanta. 

Therefore remain at ease in your mind that no injustice shall be attempted 
against you, and attend to the improvement of your talooka, and your agents 
and Karbariees Gokul Bukshi and Sardooram Dubba and Baba Matur and 
Puroodas Vunravun Paruek and others, when coming or going on business 
connected with your government, shall suffer no kind of interruption or 
injury ; for this protection, which is binding year by year for ever, the 
Honourable Company is guarantee. 

Signed with both the seals of the Guikwar government. 



Teanslation of a Lettee from J. P. WiLiotrGHBT, Esq., 1st Assistant in charge 
of the Eesidenct, to Maeawul Pietheeeaj, Eajah of Mohun, dated 11th 
December 1822. 

After compliments. — Your letter of Baderwa Soodh the 13th sent to 
Mr. Williams, the Resident, was delivered by your agent Moro Punt, and 
its contents are understood. The yearly payment of Ghasdana to the amount 
of Rupees (10,500) ten thousand five hundred the afqresaid Karkoon has 



Rewa Kanta Agency— Loonawara—Nos. CVI. & CVII. 277 



paid for the year 1878, and has received receipts for the Warats, which 
will be delivered to you, and respecting this said sum of Rupees (10,500) 
ten thousand five hundred you have agreed to send your agent yearly to pay the 
same in Baroda under the mediation of the British Government, as it has been 
paid hitherto, and pledges of good behaviour have also been given by you, on 
which account the Guikwar government has given the Perwannah for the per- 
petual guarantee of the British Government ; therefore, be confident that so 
long as you fulfil your engagements you need apprehend no failure of these 
promises of protection. 

(Sd.) J. P. WiLLOUGHBY. 



No. CVI. 

Engagement of protection from the Beitish Goveenment given to the Chief of Loona- 
WAEA by Majoe Alexandee Walkee, Kbsident at Baeoda, under date the 27th 
September 1803. 

This is to certify that the Rana Pertab Sing, Chief of Loonawara, having 
applied for the Honourable Company's protection, and having, by the friendly 
intercourse of letters, declared that all his means shall be employed to promote 
the destruction of Kanoojee, I have at his request, and in consideration of the 
above circumstances, granted to him this writing, which will entitle him to 
the friendship of the English and of their ally Anund Rao Guikwar. 

Should the English troops, in prosecution of the war against Kanoojee, 
enter the territories of the Rajah of Loonawara, they will refrain from doing 
the inhabitants, any injury or molestation ; on the contrary, they may be 
assured of protection, the Rajah on his part ordering his subjects to furnish 
provisions and whatever may be required, which will be punctually paid for 
according to the custom and good faith of the English. 

This writing is on the opposite side translated into Marhattee, that the 
officers of the Guikwar Sircar may also extend their friendship to the Rana 
Pertab Sing. 

(Sd.) A. Walkee, 

Resident at Baroda. 

Bone at Baroda, llih September 1803. 

Approved by the Governor in Council of Bombay on 5th October 1803. 



No. CVII. 

Teeatt concluded -with the Eajah of Loonawaea, 1803. 

In virtue of the authority which has been vested in Colonel John 
Murray, commanding the British forces in Guzerat Attaveessee, and districts 
conquered form Dowlut Rao Sindia, to ratify and conclude a Treaty of amity 
with me, on the basis of friendship, and- on those terms of reciprocal benefit 



278 Rewa Kanta Agency— Loonawara— No. CVIII. 



whicli had been previously acceded to on my part, and recommended in my 
behalf by Colonel Murray during his continuance in the Loonawara district, and 
anxious to profit by the friendly protection which the Honourable Company 
Bahadoor has been graciously pleased to extend towards me, I do, of my free- 
will, and in conformity to the terms previously agreed to, hereby enter into or 
confirm the following conditions^ namely : — 

Aeticle 1. 

First, as tributary to the Honourable Company Bahadoor, I hereby 
engage, in consequence of their gracious concession, in my behalf, of the 
tribute hitherto usually paid by me to the late government of Dowlut Rao 
Sindia, to maintain, at my own expense, devoid of every claim, to remunera- 
tion from the government of the Honourable Company Bahadooi', a military 
force for the defence of my territories, the services of which shall be at their 
command, in repelling every attempt hostile to their interests, by an invasion 
of the Guzerat through my districts ; and I hereby engage to relinquish all 
claim to indemnification for any injury myself or subjects may sustain, in 
our persons or property, by these efforts against the common enemy, con- 
sidering, on all occasions, the enemies of the English as my own, and 
pledging myself to defend my country against them to the last extremity ; 
further engaging to give such token of allegiance as His Excellency the 
Governor General may be pleased to require. 

Article 2. 
Secondly, I engage, on all occasions, to be answerable for the safety of 
the property and persons of the British Government, its servants and subjects, 
wherever they may be, now or hereafter, in my districts, and relinquish all 
claim to remuneration for their services from the government, as far as relates 
to them or those in their service ; but with respect to their subjects, I reserve 
the right of taxing merchandize and exacting payment, according to ancient 
custom, for the protection which I hereby engage to give the merchants. 

(Sd.) J. Murray, Colonel. 
Concluded, Camp Loonawara, November 14M, 1803. 



No. CVIII. 



Teanslation of an Ageeement passed by the Eana of Loonawaea to the Guikwae 

GOVEENMENT. 

I, Ran a Eutteh Sing, of the talooka of Loonawara, do of my own free- 
will admit that whenever the army of the Sircar come into these parts, the 
ghasdana and khirajat used to be dischaj-ged according to the running account. 
My villages were in this way distressed and the population decreased. There- 
fore, as the Sircar's army having been to Kattywar has made an equitable 



Rewa Kanta Agency— Loonawara— No. CIX. 279 



perpetual settlement according^ to the amount of former paymentsj I, in like 
manner, for my own tranquillity, have passed a writing in which the sums 
due for ghasdana and khii-ajat are included in one item. A separate bond for 
ten years on this subject has been passed to the Sircar. According to the 
condition of it I will send a Kamdar every year to Baroda and discharge the 
amount. There shall be no deviation from this agreement. I, my sons, and 
their descendants from generation to generation, as many as shall manage 
Loonawara, will- for ever abide by the above written agreement. A separate 
perpetual security bond has been passed which is to be abided by. There is 
to be no ' deviation from this, if a deviation should take place, I am an 
ofEender against the Sircar. This writing is true. 

Sumwut 1869, Cheiter Soodh litk. • 

Rana Futteh Singjee. 
Signed by the band of Mehta Nana Ichakam. 



Tean.slation of a Bond passed by Jtrsoo Phooljee Bhaut, of Moonda, to the GtriK- 

WAR GOVEENMENT. 

I, of my own free-will, pass this agreement to the Sircar on the subject 
of the ghasdana and khirajat of Futteh Singjee, Rana of the talooka of 
Loonawara, from Sumwut 1868, for ten years, viz., the ghasdana and khirajat 
together are fixed at Rupees 7,001 for one year. The kistbundi has also been 
settled, and according to this I will every year settle at Baroda, and will pay 
the money according to the kistbundi. If by the will of God the payments 
shall be made four days sooner or later, interest shall be given at the rate of 
1 per cent, per month. 

Particulars of the kistbundi. 

1st kist to be paid on 2nd Margseer Soodh ... 1 r>„„„„„ i, nm 

2nd do do 2nd Maha Soodh ) -Kupees 7,UU1. 

According to this arrangement the money will be paid year by year. I 
will pay it regularly for ten years. If the periods of payment be extended, 
interest to be paid as above mentioned, and if a Mohsul come from the Sircar, 
mohsulee and khurch and the pay of a kossid to be discharged. This writing 
is true. 

(Sd.) Bhaut Jusoo Phooljee. 

Summut 1874, Cheiter Soodh lith. 

The above written is true. 



No. CIX. 

Ageeement concluded with Man Sing Patttnkue, dated the 10th August 1819. 

As Man Sing Patunkur has repeatedly and earnestly entreated <he aid of 
the British Government to effect a just settlement of his tributary claims 



280 Bewa Kanta Agency— Soanth— Wo. CX. 



from the petty States of Soanthj Rampoora, and Loonawaraj in consideration 
of the friendly relations subsisting- between the British Government and the 
Maharajah Dowlut Rao Sindia^ and with a view to the preservation of peace 
and tranquillity^ and the restoration to good order and eventual prosperity of 
the principalities of Soanth and Loonawara, both of which have been and 
are still so distracted by intestine commotions, and so harassed by foreicrn 
troops as to be in danger of utter desolation, JBrigadier General Sir John 
Malcolm offers to the consideration of Man Sing Patunkur the following 
conditions, assuring him that upon these terms only will the interference 
of the British Government be exerted in his behalf : — 

Akticle 1. 
The British Government will guarantee to Man Sing Rao Patunkur, as 
long as he is authorized by his Prince Dowlut Rao Sindia to receive it, his 
annual tribute from the States of Soanth and Loonawara, amounting to 
Babashaee Rupees 19,000 per annum, of which sum the State of Soanth pays 
Babashaee Rupees 7,000, that of Loonawara Babashaee Rupees 12,000. This 
tribute will commence with the year Vikrumajeet 1876, or a.d. 1819-20. 
This tribute, the total sum of which is Rupees 19,000, shall be paid in 
two instalments, viz., in Magh Soodh Poorun Masee, corresponding with 
December a.d. 1819, Rupees 9,500, and in Jesth Soodh Poorun Masee, 
corresponding with April 1820, Rupees 9,500. The British Government will 
also guarantee to Man Sing Rao Patunkur his arrears of tribute for the year 
1875, or A.D. 1818-19, from the above-mentioned State of Loonawara, 
amounting to Rupees 700, if, on enquiry, the demand prove just. This arrear 
to be paid by instalments, of which the dates will be fixed hereafter. The 
period of liquidation not, however, to exceed two years. 

Article 3. 

Man Sing Rao Patunkur must immediately withdraw all his troops of 

every description, as well as all his Karkoons and officers, from these States, 

and on no account, for the future, exert any interference, either directly or 

indirectly, with the affairs or with the government of Soanth and Loonawara. 

Article 3. 
Man Sing Patunkur must relinquish, in favour of the Rajahs of Soanth 
and Loonawara, all claims to the villages he now demands, viz., 70 from 
Loonawara and 42 from Soanth, which villages, it is acknowledged, have been 
forty years in their possession. 

The above Articles have been agreed upon and settled this 10th day of 
August 1819. 

No. CX. 

Teeatt concluded with the Kajah of Soanth, dated the 15th December 1803. 
Trusting and believing in Providence — 

I hereby declare that, desirous to embrace the very amicable offer made 
to me by Colonel Murray, Commanding the British forces in the Guzerat 



Rewa Kanta Agency— Soanth— No. CX. 281 



Attaveessee, and conquered districts, on behalf of the Honourable Company 
Bahadoor, and to cement the friendship which at present so happily exists 
between me and the Honourable Company's government, I have, in testi- 
mony thereof, of my free-will and consent, entered into the following 
engagement with the Honourable Company Bahadoor, under whose protection 
it has pleased the Almighty to place me : — 

Article 1. 

As tributary to Powagur and the Honourable Company Bahadoor, 1 here- 
by engage to continue the payment of the same annual tribute as it has been 
usual for me to pay to the late government of Dowlut Rao Sindia (namely, 
Rupees 2, 700) ; but should it please the Honourable Company's government 
graciously to release me in future from the payment of the aforesaid tribute, 
then I engage to present them annually with such nuzzerana in token of my 
allegiance as they may be pleased to direct, which shall be in lieu of all 
other sums whatsoever ; and as long as I continue faithfully to adhere to the 
interests of the Honourable Company, this concession of the tribute to be paid 
by me, if acceded to by His Excellency the Governor-General in Council, shall 
not be liable to be revoked. 

Article 2. 
I engage, on every occasion, to consider the enemies of the English as 
my own, and to the last extremity to defend my country, and oppose every 
attempt of a hostile nature which may be made by a foreign power for the 
passage of troops through my districts, and relinquish all claim to indemnifi- 
cation for any losses myself or subjects may suffer on the occasion. 

Article 3. 
On all occasions when my country is threatened by a foreign force, either 
on account of my attachment to the British Government, or by people my 
enemies, I shall receive assistance from the Honourable Company's govern- 
ment to enable me to resist the enemy; unless it should appear the invasion 
is intended merely to punish insubordinate subjects of mine, who may have 
violated my neighbours' boundaries, when I agree to adopt such measures as 
may satisfy the aggrieved. 

Article 4. 
I engage, on all occasions, to be answerable for the safety of the proper- 
ty and persons of the British Government, its servants and subjects, where- 
ever they may be, now or hereafter, in my districts, and relinquish all claim to 
remuneration for these services from the government, as far as relates to them 
or those in their service. But with respect to their subjects, I reserve the right 
'of taxing merchandize and exacting payment, according to ancient custom, 
for the protection which I hereby engage to give to the merchants. 

* (Sd.) J. Murray, Colonel. 

Concluded, Camp Kalioan, December 15M, 1803. 



36 

IV 



282 Rewa Kanta Agency— Balasinore,— Petty Chiefs— Nos. CXI. & CXII. 

No. CXI. 

Teanslation of a Weiting from the Chieftain of Balasiitoee to the Collectoe of 

Kaiea, dated 30th August 1820. 

The Sircar has been pleased to furnish me with copies of the Opium 
Regulations, vh., Regulation 1., 1818, and Regulation II., 1820. According 
to these enactments, I shall in my villages regulate the opium. Should any 
peraon, however, in breach of the Honourable Company's Regulations, import 
opium, I consent that any one on the part of the Honourable Company may 
seize the same in my talooka. 

I shall make the Honourable Company's Regulations known to my ryots, 
and take care that they are respected. 

Besides, as to the opium required for the internal consumption of my 
country, the people of my talookas shall bring it from such depot as the 
Sircar may prescribe, and sell it by retail, according to such rules as may be 
in force in the Honourable Company's districts. 

(Sd.) by "Wuzoo Moozmooadar, 
on the part of Babee Abad KhanSulabut Khan. 



No. CXII. 

Teansiation of a Fa'el Zamin Bond by Cooveea Wussawa, of the Sukhbaeea Pee- 
QUNNAH, with Mahkanah Veeeasal, Eajah of Rajpeepla, on the part of himself 
and other villages of the above pergunnah subject to his authority, &c., &e., his brethren, 
all those who reside within the limits of his pergunnah Dhaeola (or those who bear 
any kind of arms), ryots and all who reside in the district of Sukhbaeea, of his own 
fi'ee-will, dated the 9th of Maha Soodh, Sumwut 1878, corresponding with the 31st of 
January 1822. 

Article 1. 

I myself, my brethren, and all who reside in the villages of my per- 
gunnah, will continue to reside in them, and remain in obedience to the orders 
■of the Sircar, the same as ryots. 

Aeticle 3. 

An exemption was anciently made from paying revenue from my 
pergunnah Sukhbarra, but the ancient veera (or taxes), dund furozee (or fines 
levied from criminals), &e., &c., and other levies, small or great, formerly 
paid to the Sircar, I will now pay. The customs of the pergunnah of Sukh- 
barra belong to the Sircar, and will be collected by its thannadar. 

Article 3. 

I will always obey the thannas which are now placed by the Sircar" and 
if any other thannas may in future remain or be sent, I will always pay 
obedience to the orders they may give me. 



Rewa Kanta Agency— Petty Chiefs— No. CXII. 283 



Article 4. 
If I have become possessed of any village or land by forces or unjustly, 
I will restore it by the order of the Sircar. In future, I will not take posses- 
sion of any village or land by force ; but if any one is willing to give land to me, 
having informed the Sircar that such is the case, and having obtained its 
order, I will take it. 

AUTICLE 5. 

Whatever I justly owe, or whatever is justly owed to me, or whatever 
just right I may possess, whatever boundary dispute may arise relating to me, 
whatever claim I may have in the territories of the Honourable Company, in 
those of the Guikwar government, in those of the Rajpeepla government, or 
in any other districts, wherever they may be, I will make the same known to 
the Sircar, and will agree to whatever settlement it may make, and take 
accordingly. I will not distress the Patell or ryots of any village purbhara (or 
directly), nor take more than may be fixed by the Sircar, nor occasion any 
additional expense to any village beyond that fixed by the Sircar, 

Article 6. 

If from this time any robbery shall be made in any village, or any injury 
be offered to ryots, merchants,- or travellers, and it is proved I am concerned or 
in fault, I will give a satisfactory answer to the Sircar. 

Article 7. 

I will seize any refractory persons, robbers, Bharwutteas, who may go out 
with a gang with the intention of committing depredations, plundering on the 
highway, or to commit thansa, who may enter any place situated within my 
boundaries. If they are too strong for me, I will without delay give the 
necessary information to the Sircar, and having obtained the assistance of the 
Sircar, will seize them. I will not join any robbers or Bharwutteas, neither 
will I give them a hookah or water, nor allow any one to do so. I will not 
give them a resting place, or food, nor allow any one else to do so. 

Article 8. 
If any new persons, either a relation or a Purdeesee (or a person belong, 
ing to any place situated out of his own territory), may come to reside in my 
village, having taken security from him, I will allow him to take up his 
residence. If any fault shall be proved against him, I will produce him before 
the Sircar. If it is proved that I secretly allow any person to remain, I will 
give an answer to the Sircar. 

Article 9. 
I will not entertain in my service any Purdeesee (foreign) Sebundy, 
either horse or foot. If it shall be discovered that I do so, I will give 
an answer, and will agree to whatever punishment the Sircar may impose 
upon me. 



284 Kewa Kanta Agency— Petty Chiefs— No. CXII. 



In conformity with the above-written nine Articles which I have given, 
I will continue to act ; if in any respect a difference occurs, I will give an 
answer, together with the expense of Roz MohsuUee, and whatever punish- 
ment it may please the Sircar to inflict, I will consent to. Besides the above, 
I will act in conformity to whatever orders may be issued by the Sircar, for 
which Mylo Wussawa, of the village of Roomalpooroo, and Katreea Wussawa, 
of the village of Sumcaree, are my perpetual Fa'el Zamin security ; they 
will observe this themselves, and make me do so. Cano Puqueero Wussawa, 
of the village of Vuraduvous, in the Baroach pergunnah, and Manglo Wus- 
sawa, of the village of Duroopulee, in the Sukhbarra pergunnah, are arr za- 
min (or counter security). 



Declaration made hy the persons who have become counter security. 

We, of our own free-will, become arr zamin, that, in conformity with 
what is written above, we will give an answer, or cause one to be given, year 
by year, always as long as the authority of the Honourable Company, that 
of the Guikwar Sircar, that of the Raj Sircar, &c., &c., shall continue 



to exist. 



(Sd.) Wussawa Cooejeb Omud + his mark, 
„ Wussawa Mylo Poonja + his mark, 

„ Wussawa Catkee Hudua + his mark, 

„ Wussawa Cano Puqueero + his mark, 

„ Wussawa Monglo Deevaluc + his mark, 

Arr gamin. 



Teanslation of an Ageeement entered into by Coveeeeea WugSAWA with J. P. 
WiLLOUGHBT, EsQ., renouncing all claim to the Ghoonwaleb Khoonteb on condition 
of receiving a pecuniary commutation from the Gtjikwab Goveenmekt for the sum of 
Eupees one thousand per annum, dated Sumwut 1881, Cheiter Vud the 5th, correspond- 
ing with the 8th of April 1825. 

I will never commit any depredation or dispute in the territories belong- 
ing to the Honourable Company, to the Guikwar, to Rajpeepla, or in any 
other talook (district), but will pursue a peaceable mode of life. On this 
point I formerly gave a writing to government with security for my good 
behaviour, which still continues in force. The Guikwar authorities at present 
collect the Khoontee of Ghoonwalee at Soonghur, th* half of which belongs 
to me. I intrusted the settlement of this claim to government, promising 
to abide by its decision respecting it. Upon this, government in its bene- 
ficence have agreed to obtain from the Guikwar government Rupees (1,000) 
one thousand per annum, in commutation of my half share of the Khoontee 



Rewa Kanta Agency— Petty Chiefs— No. CXIII, 285 



in question. To this settlement, of my own free-will and pleasure I agree : 
from this time I will not make any dispute or depredation in the territories 
of the Honourable Company, the Guikwar, Rajpeepla, or any other district, 
but will live quietly, performing service according to the orders of govern- 
ment ; if any infraction of this agreement arises, I shall be an offender 
against government, and if for my offence government should confiscate my 
wuttun (entire estate) and Geeras, I relinquish my claim to the same. I 
agree to this stipulation for the satisfaction of government, and for my 
acting in conformity to this engagement, and pursuing a peaceable course 
of life, the securities given to my former engagement are in force. They 
will cause me to answer for myself, or give an answer for me. 

(Sd.) WUSSAWA COOVBEREA OmED. 

Witness : 
(Sd.) Abdulla Khan Bulloche, Jemadar. 



No. CXIII. 



Teanslation of a Pa'bl Zamin Bond taten by J. P. Willoughbt, Esq., for the Gttikwae 

GOVBENMENT, fromBAJEE DaIMEE, VAJAO DaIMEE, MeWASSEES of TlIiLTTCKWABBA, 

including their families, relations, and dependants, dated the 14th of Palgoon Soodh, 
Sumwut 1881, corresponding with the 18th March 1825. 

In consequence of our improper conduct coming to the notice of govern- 
ment, a force was equipped against us, which inflicted punishment upon us. 
Now, through the beneficence of government, we have been directed to re- 
inhabit our villages, and to conduct ourselves properly for the future, accord- 
ing to the orders of government, after the manner of ryots. Agreeing to 
this order, we, of our free-will and pleasure, and in our right senses, subscribe 
to the under-mentioned Articles of agreement : — 

Aeticle 1. 

We will reside in the country belonging to the government after the 
manner of ryots, and transact our business in an equitable way. We will 
not commit any depredations, or make any dispute with any one residing in 
the districts of the Guikwar government, of the Honourable Company, of 
Eajpeepla, Chota Oudeypore, Gurh, or any other talookdar ; we will act in 
obedience to the instructions of the thannas of government wfiich at present 
exist, or may in future exist. 

Article 2. 

We will pay whatever revenue is due on account of the villages of Til- 
luckwarra belonging to government, and will pay according to tbe custom of 
the district the levies put upon Oopurwureea land, besides salamee and babtees 
according to annual custom. 



286 Rewa Kanta Agency— Petty Chiefs— No. CXIII. 



Aeticlb 3. 

We have given to Mr. Willoughby a written paper giving an account 
of our just rights, lands, and claims upon persons residing in the districts of 
the Guikwar government and Rajpeepla. In whatever manner government 
may arrange such of these as on enquiry shall appear to be just, we will 
agree to the same, for ourselves and posterity from generation to generation ; 
according to this settlement we will abide, and receive whatever government 
may choose to give us. 

Article 4. 

In several villages we have lent money and taken writings for Geeras 
in lieu thereof ; we admit that we have no claim for the Geeras in question, 
and we will agree to whatever arrangement government may make for the 
repayment of such sums we have lent as on enquiry may be found to be just. 
From this time we will not make any dispute on this subject with the inhabi- 
tants of the villages in question. In future, if any dispute arises with any 
one regarding money transactions, we will petition the government, and act 
according to its order respecting the same ; we will not directly make any 
dispute in future with the inhabitants of the villages, and not take more than 
that awarded to us by the government arrangement, nor will we cause expense 
to fall upon any village ourselves direct. 

Akticle 5. 

We will restore whatever villages and lands, situated in the districts of 
government or in those of the talookdars, we may be found to have unjustly 
possessed ourselves of when government gives an order to that effect. In 
future, we will not, without the permission of government, either take on 
mortgage, buy, or receive as a gift, villages, lands, Pusaeta, or Geeras from 
any one. 

AUTICLE 6. 

We will not associate with rebels and disturbers of the public peace of 
the districts of the Guikwar and the Honourable Company, of Rajpeepla, 
and the other talookdars ; we will not afford them an asylum, or permit any 
one to harbour them in our villages, or give them food, or allow any one to 
do so. If we are able, we will seize and deliver them over to the custody of 
government. If it is proved that we do associate with any person of the 
above description, we will become answerable for the claims upon him, and 
for a fine for doing so ; if any robber is traced to our villages, we will carry 
on the trace to the next village, and establish the same upon it, otherwise 
we will produce the criminal and restore the property stolen. 

Article 7. 
To satisfy government for the due performance of the above-written 
Articles, Bajee Daimer agrees to reside at Baroda for a period of five years 
from this date, living upon his own means j if it appears to the satisfaction 
of government, in the course of five years, that we act in conformity to the 
above-written agreement, and no infringement of the same occurs, then 



Eewa Kanta Agency— Petty Chiefs— No. CXIV. 287 



whatever orders government may issue regarding releasing the hostage will 
be obeyed by us. In conformity to this writingj he will remain as a hostage. 

In this manner seven Articles of agreement have been written. If any 
infraction of the same takes place from this time, whatever punishment 
government may award we will agree to. For this agreement our Wutun 
(estate) and Geeras is security ; Rowjee Bawa Gymul Sing Bharote, inhabi- 
tant of the village of Tanjooljaj of the Baroda pergunnah, is perpetual security 
both for our good behaviour, according to what is written above, and for our 
personal appearance ; and Rana Abeh Sing, of the Cusbah of Ahmood, and 
Bhatore Saheb Khan, of Veejeria, are counter securities for the same. In 
conformity with what is written above, they will act and cause us to act j 
they will be answerable for claims upon us, and cause us also to be so. 

(Sd.) for Bajbb Daimee 
by the Mehta of the Thakoor of Ahmood. 

(Sd.) Vebjoo ditto. 

„ Rowjee Bhaeotb. 

„ Rana Abeh Sing 

by his karbaree Mehta Huery Ram Dyaeam and Rana Keeseeb 

Sing Sujan Sing. 

(Sd.) Sahbb Khan, 

Thakoor of Veejeria. 



No. CXIV. 



Teanslation of a Memoeandtjm from the Gtjikwae Goteenment, being arrangements 
for the Settlement of the Mewassees of the Eewa Kanta ; without date. 

I. The following is the list of the Mewassee zemindars in the districts : — 

1. The pergunnah of Sinore contains Shanore and the three Mandwa 
towns, Maudwa, Nundurria, and half the town of Chanode. 

2. The pergunnah of Sanckaira, Naswary, having twelve towns and 
four villages dependant, and Augur, consisting of Augur and Seesana. 

3. The pergunnah of Tilluckwarra, containing nine towns, as shown 
in the Statement of the Kamavisdars Wujureea Ooehad, Chureyswar, Pulsani, 
Para, Beelooria, Nullia, Balodra, Seeral. 

4. The pergunnah of Sowley. No Statement has been sent by the 
Kamavisdar of this district of the zemindars or Mewassee villages, therefore, 
when the return shall be made, the zemindar .and Mewassee villages therein 
shall be included in the arrangements, to be controlled in conformity to the 
five following Articles. 

5. The ten Geerasia villages termed Dus Gaum. 



288 Kewa Kanta Agency— Petty Chiefs— No. CXIV. 



For the above mentioned villages belonging to Mewassee zemindars, or 
if on enquiry others should be found which have been overlooked, that is to 
say, for all villages that from any distant period have paid fixed revenues 
through the zemindars, the following Articles are agreed to for the investiga- 
tion of their rights and their better government — 

Aeticlb 1. 

In whatever town shall be found Tulput and Waanta lands, and from any 
remote period the fixed revenue has been paid through the medium of the 
zemindar, it is to be understood that, from the circumstance of there being 
Tulput land, the town belongs to government. 

Article 2. 

If in any town Tulput land shall be found which the zemindars have 
united from any remote period with Waanta lands, and the revenues for past 
generations have been paid in one sum, such towns are to remain in possession 
of the Mewassees, and the settlement of future revenue to be made in the 
present investigations. 

Article 3. 

In such towns as have been let on farms by kamavisdars to zemindars, 
and retained by them without their having any just right to the same, and 
the fixed revenues paid by the zemindars as fixed by the kamavisdars, such 
towns are not to belong to the Geerasias, but to government. 

Article 4. 

If any town has been from a very remote period in possession of a 
zemindar, and such town held by his ancestors or other Geerasias, then, in 
consequence of such long possession, he shall be confirmed therein, and the 
settlement of the future revenue to be made in the present investigation. 

Article 5. 

If in any town the zemindar shall possess Waanta lands, and hold also 
Tulput lands by grants of forty or fifty years' standing, or by ' grants from 
former governments, by the production of such grants the town shall remain 
in possession of the Mewassee, and the settlement of future revenue to be 
made in the present investigation. 

In this manner is the revenue of the Mewassee zemindars, to be adjusted, 
but the half of Chanode now consigned by government to the charge of a 
kamavisdar is to remain as at present. 

In settling the revenue from the Mewassee villages, an average of the 
last ten years, including khurajat, babtees, &c., must be fixed for a perpetual 
tribute, but in forming the ten years' average, no year of famine or invasion 
must be reckoned, for, if they be, it cannot be expected that in future years 
of calamity a reduction can be consented to; in this manner the agent is to 
make the settlement in communication with government. 



Rewa Kanta Agency— Petty Chiefs— No. CXIV. 289 



When any zemindar is completely impoverished, then, in communication 
with government, a five years^ agreement is to be made with him, commenc- 
ing with smaller payments suited to his means until the fifth year, when the 
lawful tribute is to be paid. 

If, however, any zemindar is so situated as that his affairs cannot be 
comprehended under either of the above provisions, then the agent, in com- 
munication with government, shall make the best arrangements that circums- 
tances will admit, for a fixed perpetual revenue for the future. 

The following is the manner in which, in conformity to the settlement, 
the Mewassee zemindars of the several pergunnahs shall yearly give security 
to the kamavisdars of the same to pay the revenue without any reduction : — 

1st. — The Thakore towns belonging to respectable zemindars, Wujeery, 
Sinore, Mandwa, Augur, Nuswary, Palsone, and Dus Gaum, total seven 
towns, and any other place held by any respectable Thakore, shall pay revenue 
as fixed by the present settlement through the medium of the Resident, year 
by year, to the kamavisdar. 

2nd. — The smaller Mewassee villages must pay their revenue as fixed by 
the present settlements to the kamavisdar, and if any one delay payments, the 
kamavisdar is to make it known to the agent and raise the money in com- 
munication with him. 

II. The following are the Articles of arrangements to be entered into 
with the Mewassees : — 

A. Whatever claim the zemindars may have on their respective vil- 
lages under the several heads of Geeras or Waanta or Dahu or Protec- 
tion Money (Rukkapa), shall continue to be paid by government as they 
are now established ; they shall not be added to, and if any old or 
frivolous claims are advanced, if they are founded on precedents within 
the last years, they are to be admitted for investigation, and the agent 
giving them due examination shall decide upon them; but if the claim 
be of anterior date to ten years, government is not to be required to answer 
them, and in whatever village the zemindar receives protection money, he is to 
protect it, and if the village sustain injury, he is to make good the loss accord- 
ing to the local customs in such cases. 

B. Arrangements for the protection of the villages in the districts from 
Mewassee Geerassias. 

a. No Mewassee zemindar shall afford protection to plunderers or robbers, 
and if thieves belonging to any zemindar's village commit depredations or out- 
rages in the districts, and loss be thereby sustained, then the zemindar guilty 
of having sheltered them shall make good the losses so sustained agreeable to 
the custom of the country, unless he can prove that the thieves have passed 
on beyond his lands ; if he cannot do this, he must make good the loss. 

b. The sums at present paid under the denomination of Geeras are to be 
continued at the present rates; no extortion or violence to be practised on the 
ryots on that account, and reparation will be enforced for injuries if any injury 
be done to the ryots. 

IV • 37 



290 Eewa Kanta Agency— Petty Chiefs—No. CXIV. 



c. In whatever towns belonging to zemindars any Geerasias may have 
fixed their residence, it is optional with them to remain and enjoy their rights 
at present enjoyed, such as Geeras, Ranwutteea, Weechan, and Posita, but 
they are not under these pretexts to advance additional demands or give vexa- 
tion or alarm to the villages ; and if any injury be done by them to any 
village, the zemindar who protects them will be compelled to make good the 
same and to deliver up the persons of the offenders. 

d. The Mewassee Geerasias having hitherto been constantly in the 
practice of carrying on private wars one with another, this is to be discon- 
tinued, and the injuries to the peaceable villages consequent on such hostilities 
are not to be allowed ; no infringement of public peace will be permitted to 
pass with impunity. 

e. If people of disorderly habits belonging to zemindars' villages enter 
peaceable villages for purposes of depredation and any affray ensue, and any of 
the offenders fall, the villagers are not answerable for what is done in self- 
defence, and no compensation to be demanded from them. 

,/. The zemindars in their respective villages are independent to entertain 
or discharge Rajpoot Koolies or others, or give them Posita lands or monthly 
pay, or to invite settlers into their villages ; but if they discharge people of 
disorderly habits, their being let loose on the country may be injurious to the 
peaceable districts ; such people, therefore, previous to being discharged, are to 
be bound over under double security to good behaviour, and in case of this 
being omitted, and their committing depredations, the zemindar, through 
whose neglect this befalls, will be made answerable for the consequences. 

III. The limits of the several towns in the districts as now received are 
to be continued, and if at any time or in any place there should be boundary 
disputes betwixt the zemindar and government villages, the claims on both 
sides are to be made known to the agent, who will settle them after careful 
examination ; but if they can by mutual arbitration of Punchayet settle the 
dispute amicably, there will be no necessity for his interference in matters 
of this kind. No injury or oppression is to be allowed against the govern- 
ment villages, and if it shall appear that the zemindars have in any case 
encroached or appropriated lands belonging to government villages during the 
last five or ten years, the encroachments are not to be permitted, and claims, 
or complaints are to be adjusted by the agent. 

IV. The zemindars shall continue in undisturbed possession of the 
Waanta rights they at present enjoy in government districts, nor suffer any 
molestation on account of counter claims of Tulput, &c., but whatever 
villages pay "Waanta are to pay the same to the customary amount only, for 
lands actually under the plough, and fees due to government from lands of 
that tenure are to be paid as heretofore, and on all Waanta lands^ whatever 
has been hitherto paid by the cultivating tenants respectively shall continue 
to be paid and no increase permitted ; and in case of Geerasias incurring 
debts to inhabitants of government villages, or zemindars dependent on 
government, or merchants or others, and for the settlement of the same, or 
as compensation for public offences, shall assign their rights of Waanta or 
the produce of Waanta or Geeras, such shall be confirmed and no opposition 



Rewa Kanta Agency— Petty Chiefs— No. CXIV. 291 



offered to the arrangement. Precedents of former customs to be received as 
laWj and if, ou the other hand, government Kamavisdars or villagers have 
encroached on lands belonging to zemindars within the last ten years, on 
their showing proofs of the same, the agent, in communication with govern- 
ment, is to restore the same; and if, in the manner above described, any 
zemindars shall have assigned over Geeras or Waanta rights to government 
ryots, and cause molestation to the present possessors, the agent is to examine 
into and decide on the claim. 

V. The zemindars in their respective villages hold the government over 
the population of the same, but if they are found guilty of oppression or 
injustice to respectable persons or Souears or Brahmins, the same agreeable to 
custom is subject to investigation and to be settled. 

VI. Whenever the royal retinue of this government proceeds for reli- 
gious ceremonies to the banks of the Nerbudda, the customary tribute 
(nuzerana) and preparations are to be expected from the zemindars, but if 
any are impoverished, government will take it into consideration and 
demand less. 

VII. The zemindars are not in future to bo allowed to obtain lands 
without approbation of government tmder the different denominations of 
Wecchan or Posita or any other term : the Mewa=see Geerasias are a tur- 
bulent race, and their increase is to be deprecated; this is to be made known 
ou the part of government to the villages. 

VIII. The zemindars are independent in their several villages, respect- 
ing Brahmins, Bhats, and other religious mendicants as to their Posita or 
alms to give or withhold the same, but they are not to deprive them of any 
ancient possession bestowed for charitable purposes. 

IX. Sundry Brahmins and other traders in Chanode are wont to send 
wood-cutters to the hills to cut timber, which is brought down the Nerbudda 
in rafts ; on this timber the Mewassees are to levy no more than the custom- 
ary duties, for if additional duties were put on, the timber could not be 
brought, and injury would accrue to this government; therefore the Mewassee 
zemindars are to be warned on this head. 

X. The jummabundee dues levied every alternate year by the Rewa 
Kanta Moolookgeree, including Khurajat Babtees (extra levies) of every 
description, are to be fixed in perpetuity upon those by whom they have 
hitherto been paid. Respecting these, written proofs shall be separately 
furnished. 

XI. If any Mewassee zemindar, being without offspring, wishes to 
adopt a child as his heir, he may do so according to law established, paying 
the customary fees to government, and when any zemindar dies, his heir, near 
or remote in relationship, may succeed, as has hitherto been the custom, the 
same being duly made known to government. 

XII. The district of the pergunnah of Sowlee is given to Meer 
Umeenul Deen Hossain Khan as his jaghire for his Risallah, and the per- 
gunnah of Tilluckwara to Ram Rao Anajee as his jaghire for his Pagah, both 
districts being thus assigned to special purposes by government in Doomala 



292 Rewa Kanta Agency— Petty Chiefs— Wo. CXV. 



in case the jaglnredars may show the wish to exchange their districts in con- 
sequence of the arrangementSj &c., with the Mewassees being in future to 
be transacted through the agent, this will not be attended to : the respectable 
zemindars are to pay their tribute through the Resident to these jaghiredarSj 
and the inferior Mewassee villages to pay theirs as already provided for. 



No. CXV. 



Translation of a Pa'el Zamin or Seoueitt Bond for good behaviour entered into with the 
SiECAE Alijah Bahadooe (Goveenment of DowLiTT Rao Scindia) through the 
mediation of J. P. Wiliotjghbt, Esq., Political Agent on the part of the Beitish 
Government in the province of Eewa Kanta and the Zillah of Powagueh by 
Thakooe Kebeee Sing Abeh Sing and his son Deep Sing, Peopeietoes of the 
Mewassee Village of Kunjeeee, of the Hallolb Peegunnah, dated 8th Maha 
Soodh, Sumwut 1882, 15th February 1826. 

We, of our free will and in perfect possession of our faculties, have 
entered into a bond with the Sircar, containing the undermentioned Articles 
of Agreement, the same being binding in perpetuity on ourselves, our brethren 
and relations, on all inhabitants or persons bearing arms, residing within the 
jampla or gates of the village or villages belonging to us, or outside in its 
(or their) suburbs usually designated Mowada, Wara or Was, to wit : — 

Article 1. 

We will conduct ourselves as peaceable ryots, observing respect to the 
(TTmul) authority of the Sircar (government) which has hitherto been esta- 
blished over the above-mentioned village or villages, or lands under our 
management, and paying implicit obedience to its (the government's) orders. 
Whatever settlement the Saheb (or agent) may make of the jummabundee, 
babtees, ghasdana, or other just claims hitherto paid by us to the government, 
we will agree to the same, and in conformity thereto pay the amount year by 
year. We will, moreover, pay annually whatever Dhan (taxes) it may have 
been the ancient custom to levy on Oopurwuria land (situated in other 
villages) cultivated by us, or any Salamee which may be due upon our Waanta 
or other lands. We will also pay (huckdaron buck) the rights of individuals 
according to ancient custom. 

Article 2. 
We will reside in the country belonging to the government after the 
manner of ryots, carrying on each his own proper trade or occupation and 
cultivating the soil. We will not live in enmity, or enter into any dispute, or 
commit any breach of the peace vyith any one residing in the districts belong- 
ing to government, to any talookdar, or zemindar ; neither will we quarrel nor 
make disputes with one another. We will pay implicit obedience to the 
orders we may receive from those Thanas (detachments of troops) of govern- 
ment which are at present or may hereafter be established. 



» Bewa Kanta Agency— Petty CWefs— No. CXV. 293 

Article 3. 

"We will furnish to the agent a detailed account of all our just and 
ancient rights, Geeras, Waanta, Dhan, and Rukhoopa dues, as well as of any 
claims we may possess upon any person or persons residing in the districts 
belonging to government, to any talookdar, or zemindar, specifying the place 
or places from whence they may be due. We stipulate for ourselves and 
brethren and descendants in perpetuity to abide by whatever settlement tlie 
agent may make of such of these as on investigation may appear to be 
founded on equity; whatever proportion (of these rights) the government 
may grant to us we will thankfully receive. If at any time a boundary dis- 
pute shall arise between us and any one, we will make the same known to the 
agent, and abide by any settlement of the same which to him may seem good 
and equitable. 

Article 4. 

If we have obtained possession of any village or land or Geeras by 
advancing money on loan, we will abide by any settlement which the govern- 
ment may prescribe for the liquidation of such portion of such debt as on 
inquiry may be found to be justly due. We renounce all claim to such 
villages, lands, or Geeras, and will not enter into any direct discussion or 
dispute with their inhabitants or proprietors. If any dispute shall hereafter 
arise in our dealings and transactions with any one, we will make government 
acquainted with the same, and consent to abide by whatever settlement 
it may mediate. We will not enter into any direct disputes with the 
villagers, nor demand more from them than the award of government ; neither 
will we cause any extra expense to fall on any village. 

Article 5. 

If it should be made known to government that we have unjustly pos- 
sessed ourselves of, or forcibly occupied any village or land, we stipulate to 
make restitution of the same on receiving directions to that effect. In future 
we will not possess ourselves of, or receive any written deeds "making over 
to us by sale, by mortgage, or by gift, any village or land or Posita or Geeras 
without obtaining the previous sanction of government. 

Article 6. 
We will not associate with criminals (Apradee) or outlaws (Bharwutteas) 
from any of the districts belonging to the government, or to any talookdar, 
or zemindar J we will not afford an asylum to any robber or disturber of the 
public peace, nor will we permit any one belonging to our village or villages 
to do so. We will neither ourselves give them food or a resting place, nor 
allow any one to do so. If perchance any persons of this description fall into 
our power, we will seize and deliver them over to the custody of Govern- 
ment. If we are proved to hold intercourse with them, we hold ourselves 
responsible for their persons and crimes, and liable to such fines as may be 
imposed on us. If thieves be traced into our villages or within our boun- 
daries, we will carry oh the trace to another village and establish the theft 



294 Rewa Kanta Agency— Petty Chiefs— Wo. CXV, 



on it; otherwise we will produce the thieves and cause restitution of the 
property stolen to be made. We will neither associate with thieves nor our- 
selves commit theft. If any robbery or misdemeanour committed by any 
other village comes to our knowledge, we will immediately inform govern- 
ment of the same, or on failure of doing so answer for the omission and be 
subjected to a fine. If perchance any one belonging to our villages proceed 
(with the intention to commit theft or any other crime) to any village belong- 
ing to government, to any talookdar, or zemindar, we will answer for the 
same; and should he be caught in the fact and happen to be slain, we renounce 
the claim called Runwutteea (blood money) on that village, and will neither 
ourselves make it nor permit any one to do so. 

Article 7. 

Should the Geeras, flunwutteea, Wuchan, or Posita rights of any 
Geerasia, who may be now residing or may hereafter come to reside in our 
villages be interfered with, or prohibited by any one, we will represent his 
case to the government, and prevent his making any direct disturbance on 
the subject. If we fail to do so and any injury ensues, we hold ourselves 
responsible for the same, or to deliver up the Geerasia ofEending into the 
hands of government. We will also make such arrangements with all 
Rajpoots and Koolees who are now or may hereafter be in our employ as 
will prevent them making any disturbance in any place, under pretence of 
any claims they may have on us, so long as they may continue in and after 
their discharge from our service, otherwise we will be responsible for the 
consequences. 

Article 8. 

Should we have appropriated any of our hereditary lands, or property, 
or coparcener's share, Geeras, Waanta, or Posita rights, either in liquidation 
of debts in Runwetteea or by free gift, we promise not to resume such 
(assigned) without previously coming to a fair settlement of that debt, or 
making a fair exchange. We bind ourselves not to interfere with or trench 
upon such Geeras or Aujda (provision or assignment), lands, &c., which may, 
in conformity to ancient custom, belong to our brethren or other persons. In 
this respect we will make no change, but should any dispute arise in cither of 
the above cases, we will represent the same to the agent and will conform to 
and abide by any orders we may receive on the subject consonant with justice. 
We will not, moreover, injure or oppress unjustly any respectable bankers, 
Brahmins, or poor persons who may reside in our villages. ^ 

Article 9. 

We will not in any way molest merchants or travellers frequenting the 
country, but will efficiently preserve and keep the peace of the highway. 
Should any injury be sustained (by them) within our limits, we will produce 
the person or persons who occasioned it, or be responsible for the same. We 
promise not to levy more Guddhaee, or other dues, fi-om merchants than 
those which are sanctioned by long and ancient usage. On this point we will 
not enter into any further discussion hereafter. 



Eewa Kanta Agency— Petty Chiefs— Wo. CXV. 295 



Article 10. 

We will afford protection to any person dependant on or in the service 
of government or to any detachments of government troops (Serinjam) who 
may halt within our limits, and will furnish guides to escort them in safety 
beyond our boundaries. In this matter we will not fail to act in conformity 
with the custom of the country (Moolk Sirishta). 

Aeticlb 11. 

We will discharge any Sebundy, whether of horse or foot, Sciiidians, 
Arabs, Mukranees, or Purdesees who may at present be in our employ, and 
will not hereafter entertain in our service any such descriptions of foreign 
mercenaries, either of horse or foot, nor will we permit any one to do so. 
If from this time it is proved that we act contrary to this stipulation we hold 
ourselves responsible for doing so and liable to be fined, or to undergo any 
other punishment the government may inflict. 

Akticle 12. 

In conformity with the wishes of the government of the Honourable 
Company, we will not permit the open or concealed import or export of opium 
unaccompanied by a permit or seal (Chap). On this point we will adopt 
efiicient arrangements within our limits, and should we discover any illicit 
opium, we will seize it and report the circumstances to the government. We 
will, moreover, act up to any arrangements adopted in future by government 
for regulating the trade in opium. 

Aeticle 13. 

We will conduct ourselves in conformity to any orders we may receive 
from the government independent of the above Articles ; and should govern- 
ment require the presence of anyone for the purpose of giving evidence in 
any matter or transaction under investigation, we promise to produce the 
person so required. 

AetIcle 14. 

Should a Mehta and Peon be stationed in our village on the part of 
government for the purpose of observing and reporting the due observance 
of the present agreement, we promise to make them acquainted with every 
occurrence, and to furnish them such accounts faithfully as it may be usual 
for government to demand. 

Article 15. 

This engagement is binding on us and on our descendants from gener- 
ation to generation in perpetuity, wherefore, on our decease, should a son 
survive us, we stipulate that he succeed to the management of our estate with 
the knowledge and sanction of government. In case of our having no son 
and heir, and we wish to provide ourselves with one by adoption, we promise 
to represent our wishes to government and abide by its orders on the subject. 

In this manner we have entered into these fifteen Articles of Agree- 
ment, and will conduct ourselves in conformity to the same peaceably for ever 



296 Kewa Kanta Agency— Petty Chiefs— No. CXV. 



and ever, or submit to any punishment government may award for any infrac- 
tion thereof. We pledge our Wuttun lands, Geeras, and other property as 
security for their due observance. We also furnish as perpetual securities 
for our good behaviour, personal appearance, and that we will act in strict 
conformity to what is written above, the Baroots Humeer Sing Davee Sine, 
and Mehtab Sing Kaleedas, inhabitants of the village of Kunjeree, of the 
Hallole pergunnah, and as our perpetual counter securities, Puggee Jeet Sing 
Puttoobhye (proprietor) of the village of Surnej, of the Wangdra pergunnah 
Puggee Narrainbhye Udeh Sing (proprietor) of the village of Bakrolle, of 
the same pergunnah, and Baria Uwu] Sing (proprietor) of the village of 
Sakurda, of the Baroda pergunnah ; they will observe their part of this con- 
tract and oblige us to do so for ever and ever in perpetuity, for which their 
property is held responsible. 

(Sd.) Thakooe Keskee Sing. 

Abeh Sing (what is written is genuine) 
for himself, his son Deep Sing, brethren, 
dependants, and all under his authority. 

Declaration made ly the Baroots becoming securities. 

We declare that of our own free will and accord we become security 
for the good behaviour and personal bail for the parties entering into the 
above engagement. 

(Sd.) Baeoot Humebe Sing Davee Sing, 

„ Baeoot Mehtab Sing Kaleedas, 

of the village of Kunjeree. 

Declaration made ly the persons becoming counter securities. 

We, of our own free will, and in perfect possession of our senses become 
counter security, iu perpetuity, year by year and from generation to gener- 
ation, to the government for the peaceable and proper observance, of what 
is subscribed to above. We. will abide by the same and cause it to be duly 
kept. If our principal does not act in conformity with what he has subscribed 
to, and does not afford the satisfaction demanded by government, we 
either collectively or individually are responsible for him, and pledge our 
possessions and property as security for being so. 

This declaration is sincere and true. 

(Sd.) Puggee Jeet Sing Puttoobhye, of Surnej, 
„ Puggee Naeeainbhye Udeh Sing, of Bakrolle, 

„ Baeia Bawabhye Uwul Sing, of Sakurda. 



CAMBAY. 

BombAy Government Records No. XXTI. of new Series. 

The founder of this family was Mirza Jaffer Nizam-i-Sani, better known 
as Momin Khan, the last but one of the Mahomedan Governors of Guzerat. 
While he held the office of governor, his son-in-law Nizam Khan had charge 
of Cambay, He died in 1742. His son Muftukhur Khan or Noor-ood-Deen, 
who had made an unsuccessful effort to succeed his father in the government 
of Guzerat, went to Cambay to collect forces to assert his cause, and there 
he basely compassed the death of Nizam Khan and assumed the government 
of Cambay, which he held till his death on 22nd January 1784. His rule 
was marked as well by the blackest crimes and cruelties as by his brave 
resistance and diplomatic evasion of the encroachments of the Mahrattas. 
In the partition of Guzerat between the Peishwa and the Gaekwar in 1753, 
Cambay fell to -the Peishwa's share, but the dues which he claimed from it 
were never regularly paid, and Noor-ood-deen even levied exactions from the 
Peishwa's districts of Gogo, Dundooka, and Kattiawar, captured Ahmedabad, 
and for some time held it against the Mahratta forces. . When the British 
Government had, in 1771, reduced the piratical Koolies of Tarrajah, the fort 
of Tarrajah was made over (No. CXVI.) to the Nawab of Cambay in con- 
sideration of a payment of Rupees 75,000. Two years afterwards, however, 
the fort was, at the Nawab's own request, transferred to the Chief of Bhow- 
nuggur,* by whom the sum of Rupees 75,000 was paid, and whom the 
Nawab had bound himself (No. CXVII.) not to molest. Noor-ood-Deen 
was succeeded by bis son-in-law Nujum Khan. His claim was disputed by 
Mirza Sani, the illegitimate son of Noor-ood-Deen, but after a severe strug- 
gle he succeeded in expelling his opponent and establishing his own power. 
He ruled for six years, and was succeeded, on 7th February 1790, by his son, 
Futteh Ali. 

With the exception of the adjustment of some disputes with the Gaek- 
war, the British Government has interfered but little in the affairs of 
Cambay. Under the Treaty of Bassein, the chouth of Cambay and all the 
Peishwa's rights in Cambay were ceded to the British Government by the 
Peishwa. The chouth had been originally granted to the Gaekwar in 1736, 
in consideration of assistance rendered to the Nawab in capturing Ahmeda- 

* See Kattiawar, page 115. 
IV 38 



298 Cambay. 

bad, and had fallen to the Peishwa's share in the partition of Guzerat. After 
the cession of the chonth to the British Government^ it was, at the Nawab's 
request, farmed to him (No. CXVIII.) . The agreement was not renewed on 
the expiration of the farm in 1807. The chouth, however, constitutes the 
tribute which the Nawab now pays to the British Government. 

Under the Treaty of Bassein the British Government succeeded to the 
chouth or tribute payable by the Nawab of Cambay to the Peishwa's Govern- 
ment. The principal item of this tribute consisted of a nominal half share 
in the sea and land customs, deducting the expenses of collection. In Feb- 
ruary 1853 the British Government relinquished its share of the land customs 
in consideration of the introduction of the excise duty on salt into the 
Cambay territory, but the Nawab retained his share in the land customs, 
although he was admitted to a half share in the new excise duty. He was 
however asked to revise the highly complicated and onerous tarifB of sea 
customs then in force at Cambay, by which every article of trade was 
subjected to pay duty under many distinct heads, the duty varying in each 
several article and being different according to the port to or from which the 
vessel was bound, or according to the caste of the trader interested. Although 
this tariff was highly injurious to trade, some time elapsed before the 
Nawab of Cambay consented to introduce such reforms as might be 
considered desirable. Eventually a Committee composed of two high Native 
officials of the British Government and some officers on the part of 
the Nawab, was appointed to settle the matter. The principle on which the 
Committee proceeded was to substitute a fixed percentage duty for the 
multifarious exactions of the Nawab in the shape of sea and land 
customs. The nature of the arrangements finally made will be gathered from 
the Agreement (No. CXIX.) concluded with the Nawab. Revised* arrange- 
ments were subsequently sanctioned for carrying out the distinction made as 
regards the treatment in British Indian ports of goods arriving from or 
destined for Cambay, being the manufacture or produce of that city or 
intended for its consumption, and goods which might only pass the town of 
Cambay in transit.f The British Government consented to forego the annual 

* See page 304. 

t The result of these arrangements is that 

Goods, the produce or manufacture of the town of Camhay when exported by sea,- are 
subject to a duty of five* per cent., and on import at any British ports to the import duties 
leviable on foreign goods under Bombay Act I. of 1852. 

» See pages 307-309. 



Camtaay. 299 

payment of Rupees 748-5-3 made by tlie Nawab on account of the Golana 
and GuUiana Nakas, as by these arrangements all trade passing througli tbem 
became free. 

Futh Ali died on 28th October 1823, and was succeeded by his brother, 
Bundeh Ali Khan. He died in 1841, and was succeeded by his nephew, the 
present Nawab Hossein Yawur Khan, in whose favour the brother of the 
late Nawab resigned his claims. He has received a Sunnud (No. XXIII.) 
guaranteeing any succession to bis State that may be legitimate according to 
Mahomedan law. 

The area of Cambay is about 350 square miles, and the population about 
175,000 souls. The revenues are about Rupees 3,50,000. The military force 
of the State consists of 6 field and 2 other guns, 35 artillerymen, 250 cavalry, 
and 330 infantry and police. The Nawab has first cla?s jurisdiction, having 
power to try for capital offences any persons except British subjects. He 
is entitled to a salute of eleven guns. Cambay is under the political supervi- 
sion of the Collector of Kaira. 

Goods exported from British ports for sale or consumption in the town of Cambay, are to 
pay export duties as per Bombay Act I. of 1852, and shall, if accompanied by a certificate to that 
effect, be admitted at Cambay on payment of the import* duty, but if not accompanied by such 
certificates, shall not be allowed to pass till the export duties at British ports as well as the import 
duties at Cambay have been recovered. 

All goods, not the produce or manufacture of the town of Cambay (opium and salt excepted) 
are, on export from Cambay, subject to the Rahadareef fee only, and are entitled to free 
entry on import at any British ports on the production of a certificate from the Sir Carkoon that 
they are not the produce or manufacture of the town of Cambay. 

All goods shipped from British ports for the port of Cambay and declared not to be intended 
for sale or consumption in the town of Cambay, are exempted from the export duties payable 
under Bombay Act I. of 1852, and on arrival at Cambay, are allowed to pass in transit from the 
Custom House on payment of the Eahadareef fee ; hut if taken into the town of Cambay, they 
shall be liable to the payment of the export duties which ought to have been paid at British ports, 
as well as to the import duty of 4i per cent, leviable at Cambay.* 

* Sec pages 307-309. 
t See pages 301-306. 



Cambay-No. CXVI. 301 



No. CXVI. 

Teanslation of the Tbeaty entered into with Nawab Momtjn Khan, Goveenoe of Cambat, 
for the Sale of the Poet of Taeeajah, with its Ammunition and Dependencies, 1771. 

Article 1. 

That in consideration of the Honourable Company selling and making 
over to him and his heirs the fort of Tarrajah, its dependencies and ammuni- 
tion, the same as when taken from the Koolies, he, the Nawab, agrees to pay 
theii (the Honourable Company), the sum of Rupees seventy-five thousand 
(75,000) in the term of five years, at five yearly equal payments of Rupees 
fifteen thousand (15,000) each; the first payment of Rupaes fifteen thousand 
(15,000) to be made twenty days after the Nawab's forces have got possession 
of Tarrajah fort, and the remainder to be paid punctually by the Nawab on 
the very same day of every year after as the first payment was made, until 
the whole sum of Rupees seventy-five thousand (75,000) is received. 

Article 2. 

As the Honourable Company have been pleased to show their great 
regard and favour to him (the Nawab) in giving him the fort of Tarrajah, 
he most solemnly declares he will on no account enter into any terms or 
friendship with the Koolies, or assist them by either sea or land, or sufEer their 
boats to enter any territories belonging to him, or he himself fit or equip any 
piratical boats, and look upon any enemies of the Honourable Company as his 
enemy also, but will distress such as much as possible ; neither will he, on any 
account whatsoever, deliver the fort of Tarrajah, or any part of the country, 
to either the Koolies or any other country power whatsoever, without the 
conseut of the Honourable Company first had and obtained. 

Article 3. 

That should the Honourable Company at any time hereafter have occasion 
to act against the Koolies of the other districts, the Nawab very willingly 
agrees to let the Honourable Company have the use of the fort of Tarrajah 
and its dependencies, for the use of their troops whilst they may be there, 
and order his people to assist them with whatever they may want, provided 
they do no damage to the fort or its pergunnah, which in such case is to be 
made good by the Honourable Company. 

Article 4. 

Should any power whatsoever attack or disturb him (the Nawab) in his 
fort of Tarrajah and its dependencies, he requests the assistance of the 
Honourable Company to keep him in possession, as he must now look upon 
himself as one of their servants ; and any charges sustained by the Honourable 
Company by such their assistance, he, the Nawab, most readily agrees to 
defray as soon as he conveniently can j.and should the Honourable Company 
have occasion for his troops, he, the Nawab, is very ready to follow their 



302 Camlbay— No. CXVII. 



orders with such a number of forces as they may require ; and the Honourable 
Company is to pay such expense as may be incurred on that account as soon as 
may be convenient to them. 

Article 5. 

He requests the Honourable Company will send him a proper convoy for 
conveying his troops to the Kooly coast, and that a sufficient force may meet 
them on the shore to escort them to and deliver them the fort of Tarrajah ; 
and he requests the Honourable Company will supply him with thirty (30) 
barrels of gunpowder, and fifty (50) maunds of lead, for the use of Tarrajah 
fort, which he, the Nawab, agrees to pay for. 

Akticlb 6. 

He promises and agrees to make the first payment by the time above 
mentioned unto Mr. John Torlesse by transfer upon the shroffs, and for the 
remainder four payments he makes over the revenue of the Mocawt and 
Cosbaw ; and should it please God to distress the said revenue by want of 
rain, enemies, or the like, he (the Nawab) then agrees and promises to make 
the same good himself. 

Approved by the Government of Bombay on 23rd April 1771. 



No. CXVII. 

Teanslation of a Weiting from the Nawab of Cambat, 1771. 



L. S. 



AaEEEMENT between the Honoueable English East India Company and Momttn 

Khan, Nawab of Cambat. 

Agreeable to what I have been requested by Mr. John Torlesse, Resident 
at Cambay, I now do promise that should Gogo at any time again fall into 
my hands, and the Honourable English Company be desirous of having a 
factory there, I will grant it to them, and on no account whatsoever suffer 
any other European nation to settle there; also from the long friendship 
subsisting between the Honourable English Company and me, I have 
hearkened to the recommendation they have been pleased to give to Eckarajee 
and Gopaljee Servia. I will on no pretence whatever meddle with or trouble 
the ancient possessions of Eckarajee, the son of the late Bowsung, nor the 
town or fort of Bhownagur, and take no more than what has always been 
usual for the possessor of the Bunder of Gogo to take, and what I took when 
I was in possession thereof, and no more will I demand. And with respect 
to Gopaljee Servia, I will give neither molestation ; but I do request that 
after this agreement, the Honourable Company will not recommend any more 
persons of that country to me. And by the help of God, I and my heirs will 
stand to all agreements hitherto entered into between us. 

Written with my own hand this Vlth day of the moon Eujjxih, year 1185, 
or Vl^nd October 1771. 



Cambay— No. CXVIII. 303 



No. CXVIII. 

Teanslation of an ENGAaEMENi executed to the Honoxteable Company by JwAt- 
lANATH Saheb Eot in behalf of his master Nizamood Dowla, Mamtazoolmoolk 
MoMiN Khan Bahadgge Dilawae Jung, of Cambat, for the farm of Cambat of 
Chotjth and Nappaae, for the jear 1860, or 1803-04, which has been ceded by the 

PeISHWA to the HoNOtTEABLE CoMPANT. 

Akticle 1. 

I agree to pay o£ muckta or stipulated revenue for 
Compaay and the Tuppa of Nappaar, on the follow- 
ing conditions ... ... ... Rs. 90,001 

Aeticle 3. 
Deduct expense— 

NappaaRj viz. — Rs, 

20 Cavalry for 13 monthsj at Rupees 30 each 

per month ... ... ... 4,800 

10 Peons for recovering revenue at Rupees 3 

per month ... ... ... 360 

Contingent charges called sadeed ... 500 

1 Carcoon ... ... ... 200 



5,860 



Cambay — 

8 Mehatauns writers upon the Mehal ... 400 

8 Peons ditto ... 288 



6,548 



Payable balance, Rs. ... 83,453 



Article 3. 

Payment of the above sum to be made by the following instal- 
ments, viz.-— 

Kartick Sood 13th, or 37th November 1803 ... 18,000 

Pous Sood 13th, or January 1804 ... ... 20 000 

Chitre Sood 13th, or April 1804 ... ... 32 000 

Jeit sood or end of the year in the month of June ... 33,453 

—- 83,453 



304 Camtaay— No. CXIX. 



Article 4<. 

I will pay the amount of three instalments fully, but for the last there 
may probably remain a balance in the cultivators' hands, which shall not, 
however, exceed Rupees 2,000, for the advantage of the pergunnah the 
following year. 

Article 5. 

Should as many or sultany happen (calamities from the elements or war), 
the loss sustained thereby to be duly considered by the Company agreeable 
to custom. 

AUTICLE 6. 

Whatever custom has obtained from time immemorial of receiving from 
the ryots little offerings (such as vegetable, &c.,) it shall not be prevented, 
provided they are free and voluntary gifts. 

Article 7. 
Some garrison sepoys to be allowed for the fort of Nappaar. 

Article 8. 
If any repairs should be required for the fort of Nappaar, it shjll be 
made by the Comavishdar with the sanction of the Resident, and in that case 
the charge must be credited by the Company. 

Article 9. 

Wurshasun, or usual allowances to the Brahmins, dewasthans, khyrat, 
dhurmadao, or charity, &c., should these be ordered to be continued, it shall 
be credited by the Company. 

Article 10. 

Should any enemies or other disturbance of the peace appear, the com- 
manding officer in the fort of Nappaar will proceed against them on being 
informed of the circumstance by the Comavishdai', or, in his absence, by the 
Carcoon. 

Article 11. 

I will collect from the mehal, over and above the amount of Rupees 
90,001 of rent, on account of our toolebe, &c., a sum not exceeding 
Rupees 1,000. 

Article 12. 

Agreeable to the foregoing promises I will act. 



No. CXIX. 

Ageeement concluded between His Excellency the Nawab of Cambat and the Beitish 
GovBBHMEKT, regarding the levy of Tkansit Duties on goods Impoeted and 
ExpoETED by Sea through the Poet of Cambat. 

From the manifest of imported goods, those intended for transmission to 
other places shall be entered in a separate memorandum, which shall be signed 
by the customs officers of both Governments and sent to the transit officer. 



Cambay— No. CXIX. 305 



2. Goods intended for transmission to other places shall be deposited 
either in the Outside Custom House, or on an open place in front of it. 

S. These goods shall be examined and compared with the memorandum 
mentioned in the 1st paragraph, and weighed or measured as the case may be, 
after which the goods shall be entered in the books of both Governments, 
and the amount of duty to be levied determined. 

4. Then the amount of duty in Cambay, old currency, due to both 
Governments, shall be levied from the merchant, and a receipt granted with 
the signatures of both officers, showing the amount levied by each. 

5. After which each package of merchandize shall be stamped, and 
permission to remove the goods granted, whether for transmission by sea or 
land. 

6. No Rahadaree goods shall be allowed to enter the city, but shall be 
taken direct. 

7. All export and import goods intended for transmission to other 
places, which shall not be taken away and duty paid within one month, shall 
be liable to the higher rates of duty fixed for goods imported into, and exported 
from, the town of Cambay. 

8. Duty shall be levied without delay on all transit goods at the Out- 
side Custom House ,• and if they are not taken away within one month, the 
higher rate of duty shall also be levied. 

9. Transit goods, which shall be taken by any road into the city, or 
which, having been stored near the city, shall afterwards be brought into it, 
shall be treated as smuggled, and dealt with accordingly. 

10. With the exception of holidays and Sundays, the officers of customs 
of both Governments shall be present at their duties every day from 10 a.m. 
till 6 P.M. 

11. Out of every rupee levied on transit goods, the Nawab shall take 
eight annas under the name of "■ expenses," four annas shall be taken by the 
British Government, and the remaining four by the Nawab. The details of 
the eight annas taken by the Nawab as " expenses" are as follows : 

1st. — From this the Nawab is to build a custom house on the bunder for 
the purposes of an office and for the depositing of transit goods. This office 
is to be for the use of both Governments and as a ware-house for goods. 

2nd. — The Nawab to make arrangements for the protection of all transit 
goods as far as his own frontiers, and keep the roads in his own territory in 
repair. 

3rd. — After these objects have been efPected, should there be any balance 
left, the Nawab is to be at liberty to expend the same in repairing the walls 
of the city, or in any way he pleases. 

12. If ever any change should be deemed advisable in the above arrange- 
ments, none shall be made without the consent of both Governments. 

13. Transit goods have been classed, and are to pay duty according to 
different rates, yet there are many descriptions of goods not classed; with 

IV 39 



306 



Camtoay— Wo. CXIX. 



regard to these, as many as possible shall be classified, and this shall be done 
by the customs officers of both Governments, and with the sanction of both 
Governments. 

Memorandum of rates of transit duty agreed on between the British Government and the 
Nawab of Cambay to be levied under the name of " Ehuvajat " or expense on the 
under-mentioned articles imported at Cambay for transit and brought to Cambay by 
landfoi" export by sea in lieu of present sea, land customs, and other levies to which 
such goods are now subject. 





Desobiptioit op aiimoi.es to be taxed. 


















Description of goods to be 












taxed on their numbers 


At l\ annas per 
maund, or Rs, 
3 per cart-load. 


At 1 anna per maund, or 
Es. 2 per cart-load. 


At \ anna per mannd, 
or Re. 1 per cart-load. 


At 3 pies per 
maund, or 8 an- 
nas per cart-load. 


without reference to 
weight. • 


1 


2 


3 


4 


g 












a. a. p. 


Saffron 


Silk 


Cotton yarn 


Chunan stones 


Cocoanut, per 1,000 ... 2 


Cochineal 


Europe piece-goods ... 


Jagree 


Grain 
Oil-cake or 


pc- 




Vermillion ... 


Cardamoms 


Coriander ... 


nock. 




Bamboos, per 1,000 ... 1 


Elephant teeth 


Cloves 


Cummin seed 


Cotton seed 
Vegetables 


and 




Vansloclmn ... 


Nutmegs ... 


Turmeric ... 


fruits. 




Rafters, per 100 ... 8 


lluBcapoor 


Mace 


Alum 




} 


Teali; and black tim- 


Quicksilver ... 


Cinnamon... 


Almonds (false) 




bers, per cart ...0 8 


Copper 


Akulkura ... 


Black raisin and red ... 








Tin 


Hing 


Betelnut (Mangrole) ... 






Large timbers, per 


Sawjeera 


Tea 


Dates, wet... 






cart ... ... 8 


Camphor 


Khismias ... 


Dates, dry ... 








Quince seed ... 


Betelnut (Sewurdhun) 


Copra 






Bambloes, per 4,000... 2 


Blue Vitriol ... 


Capoor Catcheree 


Bellama ... 








Verdigris 


Tumaulputrce 


Senna leaves 








Brass 


Lead, red ... 


Nesotur 






Brooms, per 1,000 ... 2 


Indigo 


Soap 


Rose flowers, dry 








Choodee Malka 


Glass-ware... 


Brimstone 








Tobacco 


Almonds ... 

Ghee 

Cocoanut-oil 

Honey 

Cutlery ... 

Sugar 

Sugarcandy 


Goolall 
Damroer ... 
Gum 

Soornugee ... 
Sunchora ... 
Cauth 
Eennel seed 
Ajmood 
Sowah 
Dry ginger 
Iron bars ... 






Mats, date, per corge 6 
















Cotton 












Spirits or liquor, Europe 












Castor oil ... - ... 












Ginjelly seed 












Ginjellyoil 












Castor seed 












Sursa seed,., 












Chunam ... 












Iron and steel 












Ironware ... 












Spelter 









The rates of duty, as sliown in columns from 1 to 6, shall be levied under the name of "Khurajat" on all 
goods imported into Cambay for transit, and on goods brought to Cambay for export by sea, in lieu of sea and land 
customs and all other levies to which such goods are now subject, and out of every rupee so levied on such goods 
the Nawab shall take eight annas on account of expense for protecting trade within his territories, and four annas 
shall be taken by the British Government, and the remaining four annas by the Nawab. 

All articles not entered in the above Schedule are to be classified and entered in it by the Custom House 
Officers of both Governments, and submitted for approval, and the value of each article as entered in the Bombay 
tariff is the value on which the classificatiod is to be based, and any articles which may be omitted are to be 
considered as in the 3rd Class, 



Camtoay— No. CXIX. 307 



MEMOEANDm of Aeeangements made by His Excellency the Nawab of Cambay and 
the Beitish Govbenment regarding Customs DtrTiES to be levied on goods Impoeted 
into the City of Cambay and on goods the peoduce thereof when Expoeted by Sea. 

The manifest of all goods imported by sea^ the vessel's register, and any 
papers received at the port of departure, shall, on the vessel's arrival, be pre- 
sented by the tindal to the customs officers of both Governments, and* they 
shall make entry accordingly in their books, and give orders for the. landing 
of the cargo. 

3. The merchant shall write on the said manifest a memorandum to the 
effect that such and such goods (if any) are for transit, an-d the Custom 
House officers of both Governments shall then send to the officer at the 
Outside Custom House a Memorandum of such goods duly signed and num- 
bered, a corresponding number being written on the manifest. 

3. Tor all goods to be imported into, or exported from, the city, the 
merchant shall present a " buruttia " (a written application) duly signed, and 
the goods mentioned therein shall be duly examined, weighed, &e., in the 
presence of the officers of both Sircars, and the value be determined according 
to the Bombay tariff, and duly levied for both Governments together in old 
Cambay currency, according to the schedule hereunto annexed, after which 
each Government's share shall be separated and credited by the officers of 
both Governments, and a receipt for the total signed by both officers given to 
the merchant. If the description of goods be not found in the Bombay tariff, 
then they shall be valued at the bazar price. 

4). For all goods exported from Cambay, the tindal shall prepare a general 
manifest in duplicate, and for any goods therein, which are transit goods, a 
memorandum to that effect, and showing that duty has been paid thereon, 
shall be written on the general manifests by the officers of the Outside 
Custom House, which documents shall then be presented at the Inside Custom 
House, where they will be compared with the books there, when the manifests 
shall be signed by both officers, and one given to the tindal and one kept in 
the Hon'ble Company's Office, a copy being taken by the Nawab's officer ; the 
port clearance shall also be signed by both officers. 

5. The officers of both Governments shall also levy anchorage fees from 
the owners or tindals of vessels according to the rates prescribed in the 
annexed schedule in one sum and in Cambay old currency, and divide their 
shares after giving to the payer a receipt signed by both. 

6. Goods shall pay duty according to the tables hereunto annexed, but 
there are some articles, such as grain, firewood, timber, &c., which cannot at 
once be brought to the Inside Custom House; these shall, therefore, be taken 
to the old Meerbeer Chowkee, where they shall be examined and duty levied 
according to the tables, and a receipt from both Sircars granted, the shares 
being divided after ; but although duties of customs on certain goods are to 
be levied near the Meerbeer Chowkee, yet it is clearly understood that all old 
Meerbeer levies are abolished. 

7. All goods to the value of Rupees 30, or petty customs, whether at 
the Inside Custom House or at Meerbeer Chowkee, shall pay duty according 



■^ 



308 Cambay— No, CXIX. 



to the rates in the schedules, and shall be examined in the presence of the 
ofiicers of both (J overnmentSj and one receipt for the total sum levied granted 
as above : the shares to be divided afterwards. Of these petty customs, one- 
fourth* under the name of "khoirat" (charity) to be deducted every day, 
and the balance to be credited under the head of " Petty Customs." 
The " khoirat " of both Governments shall be kept in one account book, and 
according to present custom, out of this sum, charity is to be dispensed to 
the lame, fuqueers, blind, &c., by procuring for them grain, drinking water, 
&c., and the expenses entered in the book by the officers of both Governments. 

8. All goods, whether import or export, are to be stamped after the duty 
is levied. 

9. The method of conducting the Kavec Perry is not to be altered, but 
kept as it is by both Governments. 

] 0. Except the demands authorised by this arrangement entered into by 
both Governments, no other levy of any kind, nor under any name, is to be 
made by the customs officers of either Government. 

11. A true copy of each general manifest shall remain with the Nawab's 
officer, while the original and any papers from port of departure shall remain 
with the Hon'ble Company's officer. The " buruttia" or written application, 
after having been examined and signed by both officers, shall be given to the 
Nawab's officer for his records, but shall be shown to any other officer at any 
time they may be required. The dufters of both Governments shall be kept 
so as to correspond. 

13. With respect to smuggled goods seized, they shall be brought into 
the Custom House, and the officers of both Governments shall, as usual, make 
due enquiry into the matter, and the Nawab's officer shall take copies of all 
the papers relating to the enquiry, while the original papers shall be sent to 
the Office of the Deputy or Assistant Commissioner, and whatever orders 
shall be received with respect to each case shall be acted on in the same way 
as at present J but if the decision of the European officer shall seem to 
the Nawab to require being modified, the Nawab shall write his opinion 
on the subject, when it will be taken into consideration. 

13. Whenever the Nawab's Darogah shall send a note with his signa- 
ture, that such and such provisions are for the use of the Durbar or the 
establishment of the Nawab, they shall be passedf free and entered in the 
books as free, and whatever provisions in transit for Europeans, as are at 
present passed free, so they shall be continued to be passed without any hind- 
rance. Provisions of the value of Rupees 15 belonging to travellers, and of 
the value of Rupees 5 belonging to inhabitants of the city, shall be allowed 
to pass free either way. 

14. The Inner Custom House, now in a dilapidated condition, shall be 
repaired at the expense of the Nawab, and both Governments shall have 

* Under the present system from one-seventh to one-half of the petty customs receipts are 
expended in charity. 

t Under the present system they are passed on a verbal message without any written note. 



Cambay--]S"o. CXIX. 



309 



therein an Office, a Treasury, and a record-room ; and for the Company's 
officers exclusively another cutcherry for all purposes shall afterwards be built 
by the Nawab. 

15. With the exception of holidays and Sundays, the servants of both 
Governments shall attend in the Custom House from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and 
shall not make any delay in the transaction of business. 

16. Piece goods manufactured in Cambay are not in the tariff, and 
cornelions are put down in the tariff at a very low price ; therefore every three 
years a Committee consisting of merchants and the officers of both Govern- 
ments shall enquire into the prices of these things in the bazar, and fix the 
price thereon for the levy of duty under the sanction of both Governments. 

17. In the annexed schedule are laid down the rates of the several 
huks; according to that the sums are to be deducted at the time of dividing 
the shares of both Governments, and credited in a separate account book 
kept for that purpose, the entries being signed by the officers of both Gov- 
ernments — the money to be kept in the NawaVs treasury in the Custom 
House; and at the end of every month these officers shall give to the hukdars 
what is due to them, and take their receipts for the same, and whatever 
hukdars are doing duty, both Governments shall see that they do their duty 
properly. 

18. No change to be made in the above arrangements without the con- 
sent and sanction of both Governments. According to these present arrange- 
ments, the custom duties shall be carried on ; the old system with regard to 
weighing, rates, &c., to be abandoned. 

Statement showing the rate of Sea Customs duties on goods im/ported into and exported 
from the town of Cambay, and of anchorage fees to be levied on vessels arriving at 
Cambay, as agreed upon by the British Government and His Excellency the Natoab 
in the year 1856. 











aji 








i-S 


Nawab's Shaee. 




o-g 


Anchorage fees to be levied 






»i 




S 


11 

go 


on every vessel on arrival 
with or without cargo. 








J, 






DESCRIPTION 


= •§ . 




s 




,ct 


,2io 










OP GOODS. 


:-ii 




^ 




m 


s„4 


Fee to be levied ac- 


^a 


Eemaeks. 




1 


J8 




S 


ogg 


cording to the bur- 


o a 






P 


11 


A 


■s 


^b"" 


then specified in the 


I5« 




' 


1 


!■- 




•s 


11=3 


Registry Certificate. 


Mfl 






m 


n 


H 


w 


B 




S 


























Ms. a. 2>' 


Es. a. p. 


Es. a.p. 


Bs. a. p. 


E8.a.p. 


Bs.a.p. 




Es.a.p. 


On all goods im- 


17 


17 


110 


2 8 


0.5 


4 4 


Prom 1 to 20 Candies 


1 




ported from what- 


















sas'S ^ 


ever port. 














„ 21 to 40 „ 


18 


la- 53 

'S3|.§'2 
















„ 41 to 60 „ 


200 


On all goods ex- 


1 13 


1 13 


110 


2 14 


50 


600 


„ 61 to 80 „ 


3 00 


ilhS 


ported to what- 


















il'^s'S 


ever port. 














„ 81 to 100 „ 
„ 101 and upwards 


3 8 
400 


he proi 
shall I 
shares 
Comps 
bay, ai 
















' 1 


Jfri 



310 



Cambay— No. CXIX. 



Statement of the distribution of the Mule allowances from the Customs and Anchorage fees 
levied at the Port of Camhay as agreed upon by the British Government and the 
Nawab of Cambay conjointly. 







On Impokts. 


Oif Exports. 


"S5§ 




1 . 

1^ 


Hukdars on the 
duties former- 
ly taken at 
the Meerbeer. 


11 


Hukdars on the 
duties former- 
ly taken at 
the Meerbeer. 


Hukdars' shai 
anchorags fe 
be distribute 
under. 


MoosvnflF 

Canoogo of the Custom House and 
Canoogo with Pashan of Meerbeer " 
Thakorejee Nutwerlaljee of Ahme4a 

on account of the Custom House le 
Thakorejee Nuvindhpiajee of Cambay 

account of the levies at Meerbeer. 
Dhurmada- 
Seekhraar 
Khasnuvish of British Government .. 

Ditto of Nawab Saheb 
Lutraeenuvish ... 
Varaeee 
Mahdrojee 
Swameenaryen ... 
Josee ... 


} 

Dad — claim 

vies, 

— claim on 


Bs. ci. p. 

2 
9 
6 

o" o" 6 
6 
10 


Bs. u,. p. 

3 
10 

16 

6 

o" o" 7 
12 


Bs. u,. p. 

16 
9 
6 

o"'b' 3 

8 
14 


Bs. a. p. 

3 
13 

17 
5 

o"'b' 6 

10 



Bs. a. p. 

7 
19 

2i 
o"'b' 3 

6 
6J 
6' 
1 
2 
9 


1 


'otal 


5 


6 


6 


'060 


6 4 



24 Peons 
8 Sowars 

Contingencies 
1 Karkoon 

Hukdars, &c. 



Rs. 



Amended XIth Aeticle of the Agreement with the Nawab .of Cambay in the year 1856, 
regarding Eahadaeee Coliections. 

Amended Article XI, 

Eight annas in eacTi Rupee of the Rahadaree, or transit collections, shall 
be shared equally between the British Government and the Nawab, 

The remaining eight annas shall be disposed of as follows :— 

• 

1*^. — A fixed establishmentj as per 
margin, under the supervision and orders of 
the Nawab, shall be maintained for the pro- 
tection of goods in transit within the Cambay 
territories. The strength and pay of this 
Rupees ... 4,950 establishment not to be changed without the 
consent of Government. 

Znd. — Of the balance, one-third shall be devoted to educational purposes, 
and shall be expended under the direction of the Political Agent of Kaira 
on account of the expenditure being annually forwarded to His Excellency 
the Nawab. 

3rd. — The remaining balance to be spent by His Excellency the Nawab, 
in such a way as to promote the health and convenience of his' subjects. 
Detailed accounts of expenditure to be kept, which the Political Agent of 
Kaira shall be entitled to inspect when desirous of so doing. 



1,920 

2,400 

180 

150 

300 

4,950 



SURA.T AGENCY. 

SucJienn. — When in 1791 .Balloo Meahj Seedee of Jinjeeraj resigned to the 
Peishwa his claims to Jinjeera,* he received (No. CXX.) lands near Surat 
yielding Rupees 75^000^ and bound himself to keep faithfully the agreementf 
then made with the Peishwa and not to disturb the districts of the British Gov- 
ernment. The State of Sueheen consists of the districts then made over to 
him. On application to the Emperor of Delhi and the payment of a large 
nuzzer, he received the title of Na^ab. In 1816 an agreement was made by 
the Agent at Surat with the Nawab to allow the British courts to take 
cognizance of crin-es committed within his State. But as the concessions 
made were not deemed sufficient, the engagement was not ratified. 

Balloo Meah died in 1802, and was succeeded by his son Ibrahim 
Mahomed Yakoot Khan, who, dying in 1853, was succeeded by his eldest son 
Abdool Kurreem Khan. Ibrahim Mahomed's extravagance involved the State 
deeply in debt, and in 1829 he made over (No, CXXI.) his country to the 
management of the British Government till his debts should be liquidated, 
receiving for his support a sum of Rupees 26,000 a year. The State was re- 
stored to Seedee Abdool Kureem Khan in 1864. 

Abdool Kureem Khan who received a Sunnud (No. XXIII.) , guaranteeing 
the succession of his State according to Mahomedan law, died in December 
1868, when the succession of his eldest son Ibrahim Mahomed Yakoot Khan 
was recognized by the British Government. This Chief died in 1873. His son 
Ibrahim Kadar Khan, the present Nawab, is a minor, ten years of age. During 
the minority of the present Chief the State is under the management of the 
Political Agent. 

The area of Sueheen is 35^ square miles; the revenue amounts to 
Rupees -1,52,939, and the population to 17,985 souls. The Nawab enjoys 
second class jurisdiction, having power to try for capital offences his own 
subjects only. The State pays no tribute. The Nawab maintains a force of 
2 field and 6 other guns, 6 artillerymen, 17 cavalry, and 46 infantry. 

Bansda. — The Rajah of this State, the history of which is unknown, is 
a Sohurki Rajpoot. The Mahrattas exacted a chouth of Rupees 7,000 from 
Bansda, which was transferred to the British Government under the Treaty 



* See Jinjeera, page 325. 
t Sec page 334. 



312 Surat Agency— Dhurmpore. 

of Bassein. A tribute of Rupees 7^351 is now taken. The late Chief 
Humeer Sing succeeded by adoption in 1839 on payment of a relief of Rupees 
30,000. In consequence of irregularities committed during his minority, the 
State was taken under British management, but was restored in April 1853, 

In 18B6 an arrangement was entered into with the Rajah of Bansda 
whereby he agreed (No. CXXII.) to pay annually a sum of Rupees 1,500 as 
chouth in consideration of the British Government foregoing its share in 
transit duties. He also bound himself to limit his demands on account of 
customs and transit duties to certain rates sanctioned by the British Govern- 
ment, making his own arrangements for their collection. 

Rajah Humeer Sing received a Sunnud (No. XVIII.) guaranteeing to 
him the right of adoption. He died on 16th June 1861, and was succeeded by 
a near collateral relative, Goolab Sing of Dewan, the present Chief, now 
thirty-seven years of age. The Chief exercises second class jurisdiction, 
having power to try for capital offences his own subjects only. 

The area of Bansda is 242^ square miles. The revenue amounts to 
Rupees 1,10,836. The population is 32,154. 

The armed force of the State consists of 3 field and 13 other guns, 6 
artillerymen, 50 cavalry, and 80 infantry and police. 

Dhurmpore. — Rajah Naraindeo of Dhurmpore is a Sesodia Rajpoot, 
thirty-four years of age. It is not known how long his family has been 
established in the country. The State has attracted little attention from 
other powers; the Mahrattas, however, exacted from it a chouth of Rupees 
9,000 a year, which was ceded to the British Government under the Treaty 
of Bassein. 

The British share of transit duties levied at Dhurmpore was formerly 
farmed out annually to the highest bidders, and the realizations varied con- 
siderably. This arrangement was distasteful to the Rajah, and in 1869 he 
expressed a wish to take the farm permanently into his own hands. At the 
same time he offered to remit his dues on the whole of the through trafBc 
with Khandeish, provided the British Government did the same, and to make 
his o'vn arrangements for the collection of only an import and export duty, 
allowance being made in fixing his annual payment for the reduction iii his 
revenue caused by these reforms. These terms were considered reasonable, and 



Surat Agency— Dhurmpore. 313 

the farm was given to the Rajah on his signing an Agreement (No. CXXIII.) 
to make a fixed annual payment of Rupees 9,000, not to increase the taxes in 
force, and not to levy new ones. 

The Rajah has received a Sunnud (No. XVIII.) guaranteeing to him the 
privilege of adoption. He exercises second class jurisdiction, having power 
to try for capital ofBences his own subjects only. 

The area of Dhurmpore is 794i square miles, the revenue Rupees 2,50,000, 
and the population 74,500 souls. 

The armed force of this State consists of 2 field guns, 6 artillerymen, 100 
cavalry, 144 Arabs, and 50 Rajpoots. 



IV 



40 



Surat Agency— Sucheen— No. CXX. 315 



No. CXX. 

Teanslation of an Ageeement entered into by Madhow Eao Naeeaten Pundit 
PuEDHAN and Sebdee Abdool Kueeem Khan, alias Balloo Meah, in Summut 
Ahdio Tismaiet o Alf A. d. 1790-91. 

Whereas you were declared as heir to Jinjeera, Kausa, and the Mutghur 
Talooka, in the Conean, and you have voluntarily resigned to government 
(Peishwa) your claims over these territories through the medium of the 
British Commissioner^ Mr. C. Maletj it has been agreed, viz : — 

Aeticle 1. 

That in consideration of your claims now resigned to government on the 
aforesaid forts, with every thing contained therein whatsoever, enam territory 
in Guzerat, situated on the seashore, is proposed to be given you, yielding a 
revenue equal to that of the territories dependent on Jinjeera, &c. The value 
of the territory to be ascertained by the average rate of collections for the last 
ten years. Of this at present territory to the value of Rupees seventy-five 
thousand has been given you, the remainder will be given on the aforesaid 
Talookas being delivered over to government. 

Article 3. 
You are to repair and reside in the territory now allotted to you as enam 
with all your family. You are not to build any large fortress either in the 
territory now given you, or that may be hereafter given, but only such sufii- 
ciently strong to prevent the Grassias from any attacks. You are to conduct 
yourself properly and peaceably, and raise no disturbances, &c. You are not 
to unite yourself to those who are hostile either to government or to the 
English, or to enter into or to make any hostilities. 

AimcLE 3. 

Should any land be granted in enam or reward to any hubsee for public 
service, the amount of its revenue shall not be deducted from that of your 
enam. 

In all these three Articles have been settled; which shall be always 
regarded by both parties. 

Dated Znd Ramzan. 



Teanslation of an Engagement entered into by Seedee Abdooi Kueeem Khan, usually 
called Bailoo Meah, with tbe Honofeablb Company's Kesident at Poona. 



Balloo 
Meab's 
Seal. 



I, Seedee Abdool Kureem Khan, do hereby engage that I will faithfully 
abide by the agreement into which I have entered with Rao Pundit Purdhan 



316 Surat Agency— Sucheen—Bansda—Nos. CXXI. & CXXII. 



through the mediation of Mr. Charles Warre Malet, the Honourable Com- 
pany's Resident at Poona^ vested with full powers for that purpose, and that 
I will in no shape whatever estrange myself from, or act inimically to the 
Honourable Company. In testimony of which I have executed this instru- 
ment as a permanent proof thereof. 

Dated Ibtk SJiadun 1305 Hegira. 



No. CXXI. 



Teanslation of Ageeement entered into by Ibeahim Mahomed Yakoot Khan, for 

the payment of his debts. 



Seal of Seedee 

Ibrahim Mahomed 

Takoot Khan. 



I, Seedee Ibrahim Mahomed Yakoot Khan, Moobaruz-oo-Dowlah Nusrut 
Jung Bahadoor, give this writing to the government of the Honourable Eng- 
lish Company Bahadoor, that I have given power to the said government to 
settle and put an end to all the debts due to the Sahoocars which lie on me. 
And that after settlement of all claims of the Sahoocars, they may make 
every thing clear and fair, and for this purpose may take and retain possession 
of all my villages, appropriating three-fourths of the revenue in any mode 
which may be most advantageous until the liquidation of the aforesaid debt 
and also most conducive to my interest. And that an arrangement be made 
for my necessary expenses from the remaining one-fourth of the revenue, and 
if one-fourth share shall not suffice for my necessary expenses, out of the 
three-fourths assigned for the liquidation of the Sahoocar's claims, part may 
be added to the same. 



No. CXXII. 



Ageeement entered into by the Eaja of Bansda for the Faem of the Goveenment 

Chouth ZlTKAT. 
To THE HON^BLE EaST InDIA CoMPANY. 

1., Maharaool, Humeersingjee Oodeysingjee, Raja of Bansda, write that 
Government possesses the "Chouth Zukat" in the Bansda territory which 
used to be collected through the Deputy Commissioiier of Customs, Salt, and 
Opium. I expressed a desire in my letter to the Agent, dated 12th January 
1856, to take this Chouth Zukat for Rupees one thousand and five hundred 



Surat Agency -Bansda— No. CXXII. 317 



(Rupees 1,500) a year, upon whicli the Agent wrote to Government, and 
Government acceded to my proposal. Accordingly, the Agent made over to 
my possession the said Zukat from the 1st May 1857. On this subject I 
enter into the following agreement with Government : — 

1. Copy of Umul Dustoor relative to this " Chouth Zukat" has been 
sent to me by the Agent with his Shera letter, dated 3rd April 1857, No. 27. 
I agree to abolish the duties on all the items therein specified, with the 
exception of the hoondees. I am, therefore, not to levy the same on the 
ryots. I am to collect only the hoondees on the villages. 

3. Besides the Chouth Zukat above described other transit duties are 
levied by me in my territory. An Umul Dustoor of these, including the 
above said hoondees, was forwarded to the Agent under my signature with my 
letter, dated 23rd November 1856. I have been furnished with copy of that 
Umul Dustoor, authenticated with the Agent's signature. As therein written, 
the transit duties and the Hoondees will be levied by me. I am not to levy 
any moi'c duties on anything, nor am I to make any new impositions. It will 
be optional with Government to institute enquiries and satisfy itself. I do 
not act contrary to this clause in such way as it may think proper, and to this 
end I will show my accounts when called on by the Agent. 

3. The Chouth Zukat having been relinquished by Government has 
been made over to my possession as above, and in return for this I am to 
cause to be paid through the Agent into the Surat Custom House Company's 
Rupees one thousand five hundred (Rupees 1,500) a year by three instalments. 
The first instalment of Rupees five hundred (Rupees 500) to be paid in the 
month of Jesht (May and June) , the second in Kartick (October and Novem- 
ber), and the third in Falgoon (February and March) : I am to pay these 
accordingly. 

So long as I continue to act in conformity with the above conditions, the 
Muktoo (agreement) come to with Government is to have effect, and the 
amount is to be received from me every year. In case, however, I do not 
behave according to these conditions, that is, if I increase the rates of duties 
specified in the Umul Dustoor, or if I make any new impositions, or if I 
realize any of the said Chouth Zukat, excepting the Hoondees, or if I fail to 
pay in the amount every year according to the instalments, Government may 
cancel this agreement, or hold me otherwise pecuniarily responsible by increas- 
ing the annual amount payable as above as they may think proper. I execute 
this agreement through the Agent at Surat with my own free will, and have 
attached my seal and signature thereto. This writing is to have effect from 
the 1st May 1857. Dated 16th March 1858. 



Additional Clause. 

p_S. — The farm of the Chouth Zakat given to me by the Govei'nment 
is to have effect as long as it may please them, and Government are fully 



318 Surat Agency— Dhtirmpore— No, CXXIII. 

authorized to terminate this Agreement at any time it may deem desirable. 
I «rill not take any objection on that score. 

Dated Sumvut 1924, Yai&liahh fad 9ik, Friday, 

(Sd.) Mahaeaool Shut Hameeesingjee. 

True translation. 

(Sd.) M. J. Shaw Stewaet, 

Affent. 

(True copy.) 

(Sd.) G. C. GiLDEK, 

Superintendent. 

(True copy.) 

(Sd.) T. C. Hope, 

Agent. 



No. CXXIII. 

Teanslation of the Aseeement executed by the Raja of DsrEMPOEE on Ohaitur Sood 
5th Sumvut 1926 CWednesday, 6th April 1870) regarding the Beitish Chouth levied 
in his Teebitoeies. 

With regard to the duties levied in our State by the Customs Depart- 
ment of the British Government under the name of Chouth and annually 
farmed by public auction, we some time ago pointed out certain inconveniences 
and expressed a desire that the amount of the Chouth might be fixed. 
Enquiries ensued resulting in Government Resolution No. 1199, dated 20th 
March 1869, in consequence of which it has been determined that the transit 
duties of . both the Governments should be remitted and in lieu of the British 
Government's share in the rest of the customs and dues, we agree to make 
to the British Government an annual payment of Rupees 9,000 in British 
currency, which amount we will pay annually through you, the Agent to 
His Excellency _ the Governor at Surat, into the Treasury of the British. 
Government, in instalments as written below : — 

Us. 

Between the 1st and 8th January ... ... 2,000 

,, „ " }> >, April ... ... ... 3^500 

„ „ 15th „ 23rd June ... ... ...3,500 

Rs. ... 9,000 



Surat Agency— Dhurmpore— No. CXXIII, 319 



We will suffer no default to be made in the annual payment of Rupees 9,000 
as above. Should any default be made, the British Government is at liberty 
to charge interest or to resume the levies or to otherwise collect the amount. 

2. Inasmuch as in consideration of the loss occasioned by the total 
remission of "the transit duties on the part of both Governments, the above 
mentioned sum has been fixed at an amount less than the average of (the last) 
ten years, we will levy no transit duty (that is, duty on goods passing from 
the Khandeish and Nassick Zillahs and other places to the Surat Zillah and 
other places and vice versa) either on behalf of the British Government or 
on our own behalf, on any goods, grain, animals, &c., from any person what- 
ever, nor will we take any due of any kind, nor takeanything else instead 
thereof, uor introduce any new practice. 

3. We will levy customs and imposts excepting the transit duties in 
accordance with the Umuldustoor of the British Government, which they 
(the British Goverfiment) will provide us with, and in accordance with our 
present practice. We will levy neither more nor less. If on occasion it 
become necessary to do so, we will represent the matter to the British Govern- 
ment, and if they accord their sanction we will act accordingly. But if by 
preserving and conserving any of the forests in our villages after the 
manner of the Forest Department of the British Government, we allow the 
wood to become valuable, there is nothing in this paragraph to prevent us 
from collecting its price when cut in addition to the duty leviable on it under 
our Umuldustoor. 

4. No customs or other imposts of any kind are now collected or paid 
on goods, &c., imported from our territories into those of the Portuguese 
Government and vice versa. This practice is confirmed. In the same man- 
ner the ancient practice by which goods, &c., imported into our territories from 
those of the Baroda State and vice versa are subject to customs duties levied 
by both the Governments, is confirmed till some «ther arrangement be made. 
But we will not levy the share which the British Government have in these 
levies. 

5. If we levy any custom or duty in excess of the Umuldustoor, you, 
the Agent, may take cognizance of complaints on the subject. We will 
render the requisite explanation and produce our accounts, if necessary. 

6. If any smuggled opium or other article is found passing through our 
territories, we will keep such opium or other article in deposit and report 
the matter immediately to the British Government. 

7. If anything is done in contravention of this agreement it (the 
agreement) shall be null and void, and the rights and practice of the British 
Government which existed prior to it shall be considered to be in force. 

8. This agreement shall be considered to have been finally executed 
when it is sanctioned by the Government of Bombay. 



^ 



JOWAR. 

Bombay Government Records, No. XXVI. of new Series. 

There is no accurate account to be obtained of the rise of the Jowar 
dynasty; but it is believed that up to the time of the Maliomedan invasion of 
the Deccan, and a little later, the greater part of the northern Concan was 
held by Koolie Chiefs or Poligars ; of these, Jayaba Mookna was one of the 
most prominent, having Jowar for his head-quarters. His son, Nem Shaha, 
was recognized as Eajah of Jowar by the Emperor of Delhi in or about 1341, 
and the present Chief is believed to he directly descended from him, and to 
be almost the last, if not the last, of the Chiefs of the Koolie caste. Nem 
Shaha's country is said to have contained 23 forts and yielded 9 lakhs of 
revenue. From the time of Nem Shaha very little was heard of the Jowar 
State for 300 or 400 years. The Moguls never appear to have attempted to 
exercise any authority over it, and the Portuguese, who held the coast of 
the northern Concan during the 16th and 17th centuries, never interfered 
more in the affairs of the inland districts than was necessary to prevent any 
aggression on their own, Shivajee and his descendants, in like manner, 
left this wild country to take care of itself, and it was not until the power 
of the Peishwas was well established that they interfered. After they had 
taken the coast of the northern Concan from the Portuguese in 1739-40, 
they began to annex such of the inland districts as seemed of any value, and in 
this way they gradually took a good part of the possessions of the Rajah of 
Jowar. The revenue of the State before this is said to have been about 3^ 
lakhs. But after constant aggression on the part of the Mahrattas, the 
then Rajah Puttung Shah in 1782 was glad to enter into an arrangement 
with the Peishwa, by which he was confirmed in the small remainder of his 
possessions, yielding then a revenue of about Rupees 20,000, and exacted an 
annual tribute of Rupees 1,000, besides a nuzzerana on the investiture of 
every new Rajah. 

Puttung Shah, grandfather of the late Rajah of the same name, died 
about 1792, leaving three sons, all of whom died between 1817 and 1821, 
leaving male issue. In consequence of the disputes among the Ranees 
regarding the claims of their sons, the Collector of the northern Concan was 
directed to proceed to Jowar and to make such arrangements as might seem 
necessary respecting the succession and the administration of the State. 
IV 41 



322 Jowar. 

The son of Vikram Shah, the eldest of Puttung Shah's three sons, was 
recognized (No. CXXIV.) as Rajah, and his mother was charged with the 
administration till he should be personally qualified to undertake it. The 
nuzzerana due to the British Government was remitted as an act of grace 
without affecting the right of Government to claim it on any future 
occasion. 

Rajah Puttung Shah died in 1865 without issue, but his younger widow 
was permitted to adopt Mulhar Rao, the present Chief, now twenty-one years 
of age. A nuzzerana of Rupees 20,000 was paid to the British Government. 

The State of Jowar covers an area of 534 square miles, and yields a 
revenue of about Rupees 50,000. The population is estimated at 37,406 
souls, composed chiefly of Wurlees, Kulkuries, and other low caste tribes. 
During the minority of the present Chief the State is administered by a 
Karbhari, who exercises magisterial powers, the Collector of Tanua being 
sessions judge. There is no military force. 



Jowar-No. CXXIV. 323 



No. CXXIV. 

Teanslation of a Memorandum of a Settlement made for the Suwasthan Jowae by 
Savillb Maeeiott, Esq., Collectoe and Magisteatb of the Noetheen Concan, 
attended by some Officers and a Detachment of troops, on J)ehalf of the Honoueable 
the Goyeenoe in Councii. of Bombay at Motjza Kooeun, in the Jowae Tebeitoey, 
on the 16th December 1822. 

Article 1. • 

Being in camp at Mouza Koorun on the 13th of the present month, a 
proclamation was issued to the inhabitants, stating that the Honourable 
Company have confirmed Puttung Shah, Rajah of Jowar, on the throne of 
h^ ancestors, and that Puttimg Shah Rajah's mother, Sugoona Bai, Ranee, 
is charged with the due administration of the Suwasthan until the said 
Puttung Shah shall be personally qualiSed to undertake it, and that all 
the inhabitants are enjoined to obey the orders of Sugoona Bai Ranee. This 
proclamation being publicly notified at tlie Durbar Cutcherry at my head- 
quarters, the investiture was duly conferred. 

AuTICIiB 2. 

Sugoona Bai Ranee will conduct the affairs of the Jowar government in 
behalf of the Rajah, but should any violent proceedings be resorted to by 
any person in the Suwasthan Jowar, including the pergunnah Gunjad, assist- 
ance will, if necessary, be rendered by the British Government to quell 
such acts. 

Article 3. 

The claiiHS of the different branches of the Jowar family and their con- 
nexions with that State having had mature consideration, as well as the 
revenues derivable from the Suwasthan Jowar, including Gunjad, it has been 
determined to allot specific payments from the joint revenue of these districts 
to the members of that family in the order and proportion as follows : — 

To Luximee Bai and her son Pratap Rao jointly per annum ... ... 1,500 

Saveetree Bai alias Eumina Bai, and her son Tookaram, jointly per annum 500 

Dhondee per annum ... ... ... ... ... 200 

Dhewba Rao Mooknay Eajkoovur per annum ... ... ... 200 

Rupees 2,400 
making together Rupees two thousand four hundred, and Sugoona Bai should 
personally satisfy herself that the full amount, as specified above, is made to 
each person respectively. 

Article 4. 
The revenues of the Suwasthan Jowar being small, and the dissensions in 
the family having caused the full expenditure of it in maintaining troops, &c., 
having had its full weights of consideration, it will be recommended to the 
Honourable the Governor in Council of Bombay in this instance to waive the 
British Government's right of demanding and receiving a nuzzur in the 
present investiture of Puttung Shah Rajah to the guddee of his ancestors, but 
the power of remitting it rests with that authority. 



324 Jowar-No. CXXIV. 



Article 5. 

Independent of tbe differences tliat existed in regard to the Pergunnah 
Gnnjad, there are some petty quarrels in the family of the Snwasthan, to 
which Sugoona Bai lianee should give due attention, and settle them amicably 
between the several parties. If this is not effected mutually, the character 
of the Suvrasthan will be lowered and my intentions go unfulfilled. Tbe 
different members should always be friendly together that no disturbance may 
exist. 

Article 6. 

Dhewba Rao Mooknay Rajkbovur should avoid for the future his seditions, 
and other illegal acts of conduct. To effect this object, Sugoona Bai Ranee 
should keep a watchful eye over 'his acts, and if he resorts to illegal measures in 
the Suwasthan Jowar, he is to be immediately imprisoned there, or receive 
such other punishment as the laws of the country direct, or should he come 
within my jurisdiction, the Comavishdar of the district in which he may be 
to be writ to, who will give every assistance to secure him : to this end 
separate orders will be addressed to Comavishdars of Soubahs in my juris- 
diction. Moreover, the said Dhewba Rao having been, under date the 14th 
of the present month, allowed an annual sum of Rupees two hundred, pay- 
able by the Suwasthan, which is considered sufficient for his subsistence, he 
was verbally directed to discharge the armed men he raised, with the exception 
of two, which he was allowed to retain, within five days from the above date. 
Whether or not this order is conformed to by the Mooknay, Sugoona Bai 
Ranee is to make herself personally satisfied with. 

Article 7. 

Sugoona Bai Ranee will personally exert herself to the maintenance of 
the peace and welfare of the territory under the Suwasthan ; will look to the 
bringing of land into cultivation, as its appearance seems to indicate great 
fertility. 

Aeticle 8. 

For the piresent a Soubahdar and a party of sepoys are sent to Jowar 
with the view to preserve the Rajah and the Suwasthan ; this party will 
remain at that station two or three months, or until I am satisfied that 
Sugoona Bai Ranee can by her own authority and means fully execute the 
charge which has devolved upon her in behalf of her son Puttung Shah 
Rajah. The above Soubahdar Luxmon Manay and his party have been 
instructed by Captain Wood as to the manner of their conduct ; a copy of 
these instructions I send you separately. By this you will be satisfied of the 
desire which the British Government feels for the prosperity of yourself and 
Suwasthan. 

(True translation.) 

(Sd.) S. Maeeiott, 

Collector. 
Approved by the Bombay Government on 22nd Fehruary 1823. 



JINJEERA. 

It is not known at what time the Abyssinians establislied themselves ou 
the western coast of India, but at a very early date the Seedees were 
Admirals of the Mahomedan fleet and held jaghires from the kings of 
Beejapore, which were attached to the office to meet the expense of the 
marine. The great maritime depot was Dhunda Rajeporej in the middle oE 
which stands the island of Jinjeera. At the time of Sevajee^s rise, the 
principal Abyssinian was Wuzeer Futteh Khan, one of Sevajee's most formid- 
able enemies, against whose fort of Jinjeera the Mahrattas erected batteries 
each year for many successive years. Seduced by the promises and threats of 
Sevajee, Futteh Khan was on the point of joining the Mahratta cause, when 
he was seized and put in confinement by three of his subordinate officers, one 
of whom, Seedee Sumbhole, assumed the command and put the Beejapore 
fleet and the jaghire under the authority of the Emperor of Delhi in consider- 
ation of assistance given by the Mogul government of Surat. 

In 1678 Seedee Sumbhole, who had received the title of Yakoot Khan 
from Aurungzeb, was superseded in the command by Seedee Kasim Yakoot 
Khan, who held the fort against all the efforts of the Mahrattas, and made 
frequent inroads into their districts, from which he levied contributions. With 
this Chief the British Government entered into an offensive and defensive 
alliance (No. CXXV.) in 1733, the chief object of which was to put a 
stop to the piracies committed by the Chiefs of Colaba and to procure the restor- 
ation of territories taken from the Seedees by the Mahrattas. From this 
time the Seedees were firm allies of the British Government, whose ships were 
spared in the general piracies which the Seedees committed. Seedee Kasim 
died about 1734, leaving several sons, the eldest of whom, Seedee Abdoolla, 
was murdered by his brothers with the view of usurping the government to 
the prejudice of Seedee Rehman, one of the brothers who was absent fi-om 
Jinjeera, and was not concerned in the conspiracy. Seedee Rehman threw 
himself on the support of the Peishwa Bajee Rao, who besieged Jinjeera, 
and, although unable to take the place, he compelled the usurpers to enter 
into a Treaty, giving up seven districts to Seedee Rehman and ceding five of 
their forts to the Mahrattas. 

On the death of Seedee Soovol, Seedee Yakoot succeeded to the govern- 
ment in 1762 by the influence of the regent Seedee Ibrahim, to the prejudice 



326 Jinjeera. 

of his brother-in-law, Seedee Abdool Raheem, who was generally considered 
the nearest heir. Ineffectual endeavours were made by the British Govern- 
ment to compromise the dispute, but Abdool Raheem would yield nothing of 
his claim. A military force was sent by the British Government to compel 
him to submit, whereupon he fled to Poona. Another unsuccessful attempt 
was made in 1768 to effect a compromise, but four years afterwards, as it was 
feared that the Peishwa might support Abdool Raheem, an accommodation 
(No. CXXVI.) was effected, by which Abdool Raheem was put in possession 
of Dhunda Rajepore in subordination to Seedee Yakoot, who also promised him 
the succession to Jinjeera. Abdool Raheem accordingly succeeded Seedee 
Yakoot, and on his death in 1784 bequeathed the principality to his eldest 
son, Abdool Kureem Khan, called Balloo Meah. But Seedee Yakoot's will 
had bequeathed the State to Abdool Raheem's second son, who, during his 
minority, was to be under the guardianship of Seedee Johur, a personal friend 
of Seedee Yakoot, and governor of the fort of Jinjeera. Seedee Johur, with 
the view of securing his own regency, asserted the pretensions of the youth, 
but Balloo Meah fled to Poona, taking his younger brother with him. It had 
always been the ambition of the Peishwa to obtain possession of Jinjeera : and 
he was now preparing to reduce it, when the British Government, after the 
conclusion of the alliance with the Peishwa against Tippoo, being anxious to 
dissolve the offensive and defensive alliance with Jinjeera, which circumstances 
rendered it impracticable any longer to preserve with consistency, negotiated 
and ratified an Engagement (No. CXXVII.) between Balloo Meah and the 
Peishwa, by which the former ceded to the Peishwa Jinjeera and his other 
possessions, receiving near Surat lands yielding Rupees 75,000 a year, to be 
afterwards increased to the value of the revenues of Jinjeera and its 
dependencies as collected in the most productive of the ten preceding years. 

The Peishwa, however, does not appear ever to have been able to establish 
his influence in Jinjeera, and the State remained virtually independent, at least 
in its internal administration. Ibrahim Khan, to whom in all probability the 
government was resigned by Seedee Johur, was succeeded in 1826, after a rule 
of about 24 years, by his eldest son, Seedee Mahomed Khan, who in 1848 
abdicated in favour of his son, Seedee Ibrahim Khan, the present Chief, who 
is now about fifty-five years of age. 

In 1834 the British Government declared Jinjeera to be subject to the 
British power, and in virtue of its supremacy, abolished the Jinjeera mint, 
from which debased coinage was issued. 



Jinjeera. 327 

In 1867 a warning was conveyed to the Chief of Jinjeera, in consequence of 
his oppressive treatment of one of his subjects, that the British Government 
would hold him responsible for any abuse of power which might be brought 
home to him, and he was urged to provide an independent tribunal for the trial 
of serious offences. Two years later another instance of the cruelty of the 
Chief, resulting in the death of two men, occurred : he was therefore deprived 
of all criminal jurisdiction, and a British officer with limited judicial powers 
was appointed to the political charge of the State. The civil and revenue 
jurisdiction was left in the hands of the Chief. 

In 1870 during the absence of the Chief at Bombay the administration 
of civil justice fell into disorder -and the irregularity in the collection of 
revenue gave rise to numerous disputes. The Seedee Sirdars indignant at the 
Nawab's prolonged residence in Bombay, at his extravagance, and at his employ- 
ment of Hindoos instead of Mahomedans, formally deposed the Nawab and 
elected his son as Chief in his stead, pleading in justification of their proceedings 
that by ancient usage, they had a right to interference in the government 
of the State. A British officer was deputed to Jinjeera to enquire into the 
relations between the Nawab and his Sirdars, the alleged dissatisfaction of the 
people with the Nawab's rule, and the conditions under which his authority 
might be re-established. The result of this enquiry was to establish the fact 
that, though the Sirdars had from time to time exercised an irregular power of 
interference in the Government, no claim to exercise this power had been 
adduced since the establishment of the paramount authority of the British 
Government, by which the Nawab has always been treated as the sole respon- 
sible ruler. Although a certain amount of discontent was found to exist at 
Jinjeera, the general disaffection did not appear to be such as should preclude 
the return of the Chief under proper security for the better management of 
the State. !S.ccordingly it was decided to restore the Nawab on certain 
conditions which were embodied in a formal Agreement (No. CXXVIII.), 
and accepted by the Nawab who was accordingly formally reinstated in 
December 1870. 

The area of Jinjeera is 324 square miles ; the gross revenue amounts to 
Rupees 2,85,000, and is principally derived from land. The population is 
71,996 souls. The Seedee pays no tribute. 

He keeps up a force of 700 men for garrison and police duties, and has 
50 guns. 



Jinjeera— No. CXXV. 329 



No. CXXV, 

Articles by which the English Nation and the Si;EDEES of Jinjeeha of Eajahpoee 
have adjusted an Alliance, Defensive and Offensive, on the Coast of India. 

For to establish upon a firm and lasting foundation a perpetual alliance 
and sincere friendship betwixt the governments of Jinjeera and Bombay, 
Secdee Saut, Seedee Ombar AfEaja, Seedee Mossoot, and the other principal 
Seedees residing in the said Jinjeera, have agreed and settled with the Honour- 
able Robert Cowan, Esq., President and Governor for the Honourable English 
Company, &c., in Council. 

Article 1. 
That they shall make a league against all the enemies of both govern- 
ments in India (Europeans, subjects of the kings of Hindostan, Persia, 
Arabia, and China excepted), and particularly against Angria, both govern- 
ments making a vigorous war by sea and land, not regarding any offers of 
peace from that enemy, and neither of the two allies shall hear alone nor 
particularly anything relating to peace, unless both are present at the same 
time anything is proposed, and are to resolve on nothing without the consent 
of both governments. 

Article 2. 

That in ease one of the two governments may have an enemy that is in 
amity with the other, in such case the league is only to be defensive, and must 
not fail on any pretence to assist them that are invaded ; and in case of any 
invasion, the government that is in amity with the aggressor shall interpose 
their good offices as mediators to accommodate the differences that have 
happened. 



Article 3. 

As to the union of the forces of Bombay and Jinjeera in their actions 
against Angria, as well by sea as by land, all the marine forces of Bombay are 
to be in conjunction with those of Jinjeera, who are to be commanded by 
their own proper officer, yet he is to act as subordinate to the chief commander 
of the English forces, as being more experienced in sea-fighting, and the fleet 
of Bombay of greater force ; and as in Bombay there is no more infantry than 
is sufficient for their garrisons, the necessary land forces are to be provided by 
the Seedees of Jinjeera. 

Article 4. 
And likewise, in case the territories of the Seedee should be invaded by 
any power that is an enemy to both governments, they are to be assisted with 
all the marine force of Bombay,- and in case that the Government of Bombay 
should be invaded by any power that is an enemy to both governments, they 
shall be assisted from Jinjeera with thirty fighting gallivats and two thousand 
sepoys. 

IV 43 



330 Jinjeera— No. CXXV. 



Article 5. 

That all that is taken in this war by sea by the united forces of both 
governments shall be given to the English, and what shall be taken^ by land 
shall be given to the Seedees, according as is expressed in the 6th and 7th 
Articles. 

Article 6. 

And if God shall be pleased to give this alliance the desired success, and 
that Angria shall be expelled the fort of Cundary by the united forces of both 
governments, that place shall be given to the English with all the ammunition 
and artillery that shall be found therein, and all,the other forts that shall be 
taken from the said enemy shall be given to the Seedee with all the ammuni- 
tion and artillery found in them, except Colaba, which shall be entirely 
demolished with all its bulwarks and batteries, so as one stone shall not be left 
above another, and shall never be rebuilt without the consent and pleasure of 
both governments; and the revenues and produce of the lands annexed to that 
fort, and whatever tribute belongs to it (except royal grants and possessions in 
the hands of the ancient proprietors), shall be annually and equally divided, 
half to the English and the other half to the Seedees of Jinjeera, and the 
care and security of these lands is to be provided for by both. 

Article 7. 

In the place called Mopaut, betwixt the rivers of Nagotan and Penn 
in the district of Colaba, the English may build, if they think proper, a 
warehouse and small fort with artillery sufficient for the better security of 
those lands and their roads, and the conveniency of merchants trading, putting 
a garrison therein, and the customs and other rents that shall be recovered 
shall be annually and equally divided, half to the English and half to the 
Seedees of Jinjeera, and likewise they shall equally pay the charges of build- 
ing the fort and its garrison, and both governments shall take care to encourage 
trade and preserve the subjects. 

Article 8. 

That all the ammunition that shall be expended in the war, as well by 
sea as by land, by either of the governments, shall be on their respective 
accounts, and in case one should be necessitated to take of the other, if they 
can spare it, they are to give it for its just price. 

Article 9. 

If any robberies are committed on either side, restitution is immediately 
to be made to the persons wronged. 

Article 10. 

That deserters who put themselves under the protection of either govern- 
ment shall not be delivered up if they have committed a crime worthy of 
death. 



Jinjeera— No. CXXV. 



331 



Article 11. 
That the Seedees of Jinjeera shall upon no pretence hereafter issue out 
their passes to the shipping and people of Angria. 

Article 13. 

That after Colaba is taken with its dependencies, if it should be attacked 
by the enemy, the charges of the forces that shall be left for its defence shall 
be equally defrayed by both governments. 

Article 13. 

That after the ratification of these Articles, by which the league is ad- 
justed, we are immediately to put them in execution. 

This VAth day of the month Ritjjub, and the 16th year of His Majesty's 
reign and 1146 of the Law, or the' 6th of JDecemher 1733. 



Khajrit 

Khan's 

Seal. 



Seedee 

Abdull 

Kehman's 

Seal. 



Seedee 

Yakoot 

Khan's 

Seal. 




Seedee 

Mosoot's 

Seal. 



Seedee 

Sumbhole's 

Seal. 



Seedee 

Oiubar's 

Seal. 



Confirmed by th.ft Honourable the President in Council of Bombay on 
the 11th December 1733. 



332 



Jinjeera-No. CXXVI. 



Seceet Aeticle adjusted betwixt the Goveenments of Bombay and Jinjeeea of 
Eajahpoee, signed and published the same time as was the Geneeal Teeaty of 
Alliance. 

In equipping a fleet to chastise and destroy the enemy Angria, the 
Government of Bombay have expended Rupees two lakhs; that the same be 
effectually represented to court, and the King's order obtained upon the 
Governor of Surat for the payment of Rupees three lakhs on account of the 
tunkha of the fleet and forts, which order we oblige ourselves to deliver to 
the Government of Bombay, in which order it shall be expressed that the 
said money shall be paid out of the treasury of Surat to the Government of 
Bombay, and after the said Rupees three lakhs are received from the Surat 
government, they shall take to themselves Rupees two lakhs, and one shall 
be given to the Seedees of Jinjeerah. 

TJds lll/i of the monili Rujjab, in the 16t/i t/ear of His Majesty's reign, 
or the nil of December 1733. 



Khayrit 

Khau's 

Seal. 




Seedee 

Yakoot 

Khau's 

Seal. 



No. CXXVI. 

Wheeeas a difference has subsisted between Seedee Yakoot Khan and Seedee Abdool 
Eaheem Khan, who have left their dispute to the decision of the Goveenoe of 
Bombay of their own free-will, he has settled the following Aeticles to be entered 
into between them ; if they act contrary thereto, they will fall under the displeasure of 
the IIonoueable Company. 

Article 1. 
That Seedee Abdool Raheem Khan shall live at Rajepore as Soubadar 
with seven hundred men under his command, whose pay he shall pay out of 
the rent of l\ tuppas agreeable to the Sircar's rule, which tuppas shall be let 
out to him at farm, excepting five villages belonging to Seedee Yakoot, and 
he shall pay the balance, if any due after paying for the above seven hundred 
men, into the Sircar annually, tendering the account thereof to Seedee 
Yakoot Khan. 



Article 3. 

That Seedee Yakoot Khan will allow Seedee Abdool Raheem Khan 
certain villages and oarts for his house expense. 



Jinjeera-No. CXXVI. 333 



AUTICLB 3. 

Ttat Seedee Abdool Raheem Khan shall take such care of the Conkery 
and its town walls as he may think proper, with orders from Jinjeera, and 
will not admit any man belonging to the foreign durbar to come in without 
orders from Jinjeera, and will not let any man pass or repass by Moorad gate 
without orders from Jinjeera as usual. 



Article 4. 

That Seedee Abdool Raheem Khan shall write no letter to the foreign 
durbars without orders from Jinjeera, neither shall he keep any man who 
might go to him from Jinjeera upon disgust. 

Article 5. 
That Seedee Abdool Raheem Khan shall make no command in the coun- 
try, nor has he anything to do with the fleet; only the Sircar has power over 
the country and fleet. 

Article 6. 

That Seedee Abdool Raheem Khan has no manner of business with the 
town and government ; the Sii'car's oflicers will remain there and carry on 
the business as usual. 



Article 7. 
That the seal of Yakoot Khan shall be made use of by Yakoot Khan 
only. 

Article 8. 
That Seedee Abdool Raheem* Khan shall supply the fort of Jinjeera with 
cajans, &c., necessaries, as usual, for which he shall have customary abatement 
in the amount of the farm of the prementioned 3i tuppas. 



Article 9. 
That Seedee Abdool Raheem Khan shall not interfere in any examina- 
tion of criminal causes for justice, but send the parties guilty thereof to 
Jinjeera to be examined. 

The above nine Articles both contracting parties shall strictly observe, 
and Seedee Abdool Raheem Khan will obey Seedee Yakoot Khan's orders 
and perform his duty agreeably to the above agreements. 

Bombay Castle, 6i/i June 1772. 



334 Jinjeera-Wo. CXXVII. 



No. CXXVII. 

Agekement between the Hojstoueable United English East India CoMPANr and the 
Peishwa Madho Eao Naeian Pundit Puedhaun Bahadooe, settled by Me. 
C'haeles Waeeen Malet, Eesident of the said Honotteable United East India 
Company at the Couet of Poona, by virtue of the full powers delegated to him by the 
Eight Honotjeablb Chaeles Eael Coenwallis, K.G., Goveenoe Gbneeal in 
Council, appointed by the Honoueable the Couet of Dieectoes of the said United 
Company to direct and control all their affairs in the East Indies relative to the Pdets 
of Jinjeeea, Dhunda, Eajepoee, Consaw, and Medgue, with their dependencies 
in the country of Cokun, now in the possession of the Abyssinians, and of which 
Seedee Abdool Kueeem Khan, commonly styled Balloo Mea^:, was heir, but who 
has by his own free-will and consent resigned, by a written instrument, all claim thereto 
agreeably to the following Articles : — ' 

Article 1. 

I, Seedee Abdool Kureem Khan, have by a written instrument resigned 
to the Sircar of Rao Pundit Purdhaun Bahadoor all claim to my hereditary 
territory, with its forts, and all effects, great and small, contained therein, 
the said Rao Pundit Purdhaun Bahadoor having on bis part agreed to grant 
me and my heirs for ever, free from all claim or incumbrance, and without 
reserve, a territory under the denomination of altumgah, in the province of 
Guzerat, on the sea coast in one quarter, and as far as possible contiguous in 
its parts, yielding a revenue (to be computed from the best collection of the 
collections of ten preceding years under the Peishwa's government) equal to 
the revenue of Jinjeera and its dependencies aforesaid, as collected in the most 
productive year of ten years preceding the present, A portion of the said 
territory, producing the yearly revenue of Rupees seventy-five thousand, is to 
be granted me in altumgah ; at present the remainder to be put in my pos- 
session in the same year that the aforesaid forts and districts may fall into 
the possession of the Sircar of the said Pundit Purdhaun, in which the condi- 
tion of contiguity to the former grant is to be observed with all possible 
punctuality. 

Article 2. 

I agree to proceed with my brother, relations, and dependants to reside 
on the territory previously granted to me, on which, and on that heareafter 
to be granted, I agree not to construct any fort or place of greater strength 
than may be necessary for my protection against Grassias and freebooters. 
I engage to conduct myself peaceably and justly, to create no feuds or dis- 
turbances, to join no enemy of the Honourable English East India Company 
or of Rao Pundit Purdhaun Bahadoor, nor to act hostilely toward them. 

Article 3. 
If Rao Pundit Purdhaun Bahadoor should permit any part of my above- 
mentioned hereditary territory to remain in the possession of any Abyssinian 
or other person for the promotion of his own objects, or should he, after 



Jiujeera-No. CXXVIII. 335 



getting possession o£ the said territory, dispose of any part thereof by gift or 
otherwisej no deduction is to be made on that account from my altumgah, of 
which I am to be put in full possession on the cessation of hostilities between 
the Peishwa and the said districts of Jinjeera, according to this agreement, on 
a calculate of the full produce of the reTenue of the dependencies of Jinjeera 
as above mentioned. The said Seedee Abdool Kureem Khan having, by the 
foregoing three Articles, relinquished all his hereditary titles and possessions 
to Rao Pundit Purdhaun, and an engagement being thereby entered into 
between the parties, neither is to deviate therefrom. And Rao Pundit Pur- 
dhaun is at liberty to pursue such modes and at such times as he may think 
proper to get possession of the aforesaid forts and dependencies that are at 
present in the hands of other Abyssinians, to whom no assistance will be 
given by the Honourable Company. This being agreed to by the Sircars 
of the Honourable Company and Rao Pundit Purdhaun Bahadoor, written 
instruments executed by Rao Pundit Purdhaun on one part, and Mr. Malet 
on the other, specifying the same, have been exchanged ; the said Mr. Malet 
having engaged to procure and deliver to Rao Pundit Purdhaun Bahadoor 
a copy, ratified by the Right Honourable the Governor General in Council, 
on the delivery of which the Treaty executed by Mr. Malet shall be returned. 



Signed and sealed in Poona the 6ti June 1791. 



The Honour- 
able Com- 
pany's Seal. 



(Sd.) C. W. Malet, 

Besident. 



Exchanged \1tJi June 1791. 

(Sd.) C. W. Malet. 



No. CXXVIII. 

Aeticles of Ageeement witli His Exoeliency Seedee Ibrahim Khan, Nawab of 

JiNJEEEA. 

Whereas His Excellency Nawab Seedee Ibrahim Khan has applied to the 
British Government to reinstate him in the administration of the State of 
Jinjeera, and whereas Government are willing to reinstate, him subject to 
such conditions as will secure the well-being of the people and a better 
administration of the affairs of the State, His Excellency Nawab Ibrahim 
Khan hereby agrees to observe the following Articles of Agreement : — 

Aeticle 1. 
In all matters of importance the Nawab of Jinjeera agrees to follow 
the advice of the British Government as conveyed by the Political Officer 
representing that Government at Jinjeera. 



336 Jinjeera No. CXXVIII. 



Aeticle 2. 

The Nawab will defray all expenses connected with the Agency, tlie 
amount of such expenses being fixed by Government from time to time 
according to what may appear to them necessary for the due exercise of the 
control now vested in them. 

Article. 3. 

The Nawab will give all proper assistance to the Political Agent and his 
Assistant in the exercise of the criminal jurisdiction now vested in them, and 
for this purpose will appoint a competent Magisterial Officer, to be approved 
Ijy Government, to exercise powers similar to those of a subordinate Magis- 
trate of the 1st Class, and to commit cases for trial by the Political Agent 
and his Assistant. 

Article 4. 

The Nawab will maintain an efficient Executive Police force of a strength 
approved by Government. The officer in charge of such force will be under 
tlie control of the Nawab's Magisterial officer, and will be his Assistant for 
Police purposes. 

Article 5. 

The Nawab agrees to draw up a code of Rules for the guidance of his 
revenue officers, prescribing the mode of assessing and realizing the revenue 
and of dealing with defaulters. Such rules when approved by Government 
to be recognized as the only legal procedure. 

Article 6. 

The Nawab agrees to entertain a competent tutor, to be approved by 
Government, for the education of his son, Seedee Ahmed Khan, and will 
retain his services so long as Government consider it advisable. 

Article 7. 

All complaints and claims brought by the Nawab against Seedee Hossein 
Jaburtee and others in connection with the recent usui-pation, and all com- 
plaints and claims which may up to the date of the present Agreement have 
been brought by Seedee Hossein Jaburtee and others against the Nawab, 
shall, if not already settled by the orders of Government, be submitted to 
tlio arbitration of the Political Agent, subject to the confirmation of Gov- 
ernment. 

Article 8. 

The Nawab agrees to dismiss ITajee Mahomed Thangay from his service,, 
and engages not to rc-employ him either in a public or private capacity. 



THE SATARA JAGHIREDARS. 

From Bombay Government Records, No. XLI. of new Series and reports hy the 

Bombay Government. 
By the 7th Article of the Satara Treaty of 1819, the possessions of the 
jaghiredars within the Rajah's territory were guaranteed by the British 
Government, who engaged to secure that the jaghiredars should perform the 
service which they owed to the Eajah, according to estahHshed custom. The 
jaghiredars thus guaranteed were the Rajah of Akulkote, the Punt Sueheo, 
the Punt Prithee Nidhee, the Duflay, the Nimhalkur and Sheikh Meera 
Waekur. The tenures of these Chiefs date from the period when their agree- 
ments were made with the British Government, and not from the date of the 
grants made by the Rajahs of Satara. In 1839, on the accession of Shahjee, 
the jaghiredars were placed under the direct management and control of the 
British Government, their contingents and pecuniary payments being reserved 
to the Rajah on the scale fixed in 1819. They have not the power of life and 
death. All serious criminal cases, involving the punishment of death or 
transportation for life, are tried in a court presided over by a British officer, 
in association with the jaghiredar within whose territory the offence was 
committed, and the confirmation of the British Government is required 
before the sentence can be carried into effect. The jaghiredars maintain a 
few sowars and sepoys for police and revenue duties, but have no regular 
troops. 

In 1862 the jaghiredars, with exception of the Waekur, were granted 
Sunnuds (No. CXXIX.) conferring on them the right of adoption. 

Akulkote. — In 1707 when Shahjee, grandson of Sevajee, was engaged in 
battle with Tara Bai for the recovery of his rights, a woman whose husband 
had been slain in action threw her child before the Rajah, calling out that 
she devoted him to the Rajah's service. Shahjee took charge of hirn, and 
named him Futteh Sing Bhonsla in commemoration of his victory. When 
the lad grew up, he received the title of Rajah and the jaghire of Akulkote, 
which has ever since remained in the family. Futteh Sing was succeeded by his 
adopted son, Shahjee, and he by the second Futteh Sing, who was the jaghiredar 
with whom the British Government formed Engagements (No. CXXX.) in 
1820. He was succeeded by his son Malojee Rao, and the latter in 1838 
by his son Shahjee, who died in 1857. 



* See Lapsed States, page 514. 
IV 43 



338 The Satara Jaghiredars— Punt Sueheo, Punt Prithee Nidhee. 

The misrule and incapacity of his successor Malojee necessitated the 
interference of the British Government^ and in 1866 the State was placed 
under management. Malojee died in 1870 when the succession of his son 
Shahjee was recognized. During the minority of the young Chief who 
is now nine years of age the country remains under British supervision. 

In 1868 the contingent of 100 horsemen which the Chief was bound to 
maintain under the Treaty of 1820 was disbanded and a money payment of 
JRupees 14^592 per annum, being two-thirds of the actual cost of the contin- 
gent^ was substituted. The estimated gross revenue is Rupees 2,47,872; the 
population 87,068 souls; and the area 498 square miles. 

Pwnt SucJieo. — The Punt Sueheo of Bhor is one of the eight hereditary 
ministers of the old Mahratta empire. Chimnajee Sueheo, with whom the first 
Engagement (No. CXXXI.) was made by the British Government, was one of 
the earliest to abandon the cause of Bajee Rao after the Proclamation of 11th 
February 1818. He died in 1827 and was succeeded by his adopted son 
Rughonath Rao Chimnajee with whom an Engagement (No. CXXXII.) for 
the exchange of territory was concluded in 1830. 

Chimnajee Rughonath was adopted by his uncle Rughonath Rao on his ' 
death-bed in 1837. A new Engagement (No. CXXXIII.) was concluded with 
him in 1839. On his adoption he was required to pay a nuzzerana of 
Rupees 53,021 to the Rajah of Satara, and Rupees 27,703 to the British 
Government. He died in 1871 and was succeeded by his son Shankar Rao, 
the present Chief, now twenty -three years of age. He was entrusted with 
the management of his property in 1874. The family enjoys an assign- 
ment of six per cent, on the revenues of certain districts in the Deccan 
and Khandeish, and a considerable jaghire to the south-west of Poena. 

The Punt Sueheo pays a tribute of Rupees 5,235-2 to the British Govern^ 
ment. His revenues amount to Rupees 4,42,889 ; the area of his jagMre is 
500 square miles; and the population 1,36,075 souls. 

Punt Prithee Nidhee. — The Chief with whom the British Government 
formed its first Engagement (No. CXXXIV.) was Purshram Pundit. The title 
of Prithee Nidhee, which means "the likeness and representation of the 
Rajah,'' was conferred by Rajaram, when, during the misfortunes which 
followed the death of Sevajee, he established a court at Gingee on the plan of 
the court of his father. The title is higher than that of Peishwa. Purshram 



The Satara Jaghiredars— The Duflay, The Nimtaalkur. 339 

Pundit had held the jaghire for about forty years before the overthrow of 
the Peishwa Bajee Rao. In 1846 he adopted a son Sreenewas Purshram, 
now forty-three years of age, on which occasion he was required to pay a 
nuzzerana of Rupees 25,000 to the Rajah of Satara. 

The Punt Sucheo pays no tribute to the British Government, but has 
an assignment of six per cent., or Rupees 1,918, on the revenues of some of 
his villages. The present revenues of the jaghire amounts to about Rupees 
1,25,000, and the population to 68,355. The area of the jaghire, which is 
composed of various isolated estates, is 213 square miles. 

The Duflay. — This family derive their name from the village of Duflapore in 
the Juthpergunnah. The Engagement' (No. CXXXV.) of the British Grovern- 
ment in 1820 was made with Renooka Bai, first widow of Canojee Duflay. 
The estate passed from her to the second widow Saloo Bai, on whose death 
in 1823, Ramrao Duflay, the head of a younger branch of the family, 
succeeded. In 1827 the jaghire was attached by the Rajah of Satara to pay 
off the Chiefs debts. After their liquidation, the estate was restored in 1841 
to Bageerthee Bai, widow of Ramrao. The British Government has more 
than once interfered to adjust the pecuniary affairs of the jaghire. The pre- 
sent jaghiredar Amrut Rao Duflay is forty-one years of age. 

In 1872 in consequence of numerous complaints of oppression on the 
part of the jaghiredar he was deprived of all civil and criminal jurisdiction, 
and a karbhari was appointed with certain limited powers ; his subsequent 
contumacy rendered it necessary to assume the whole management of the 
jaghire. 

The jaghiredar pays to the British Government Rupees 6,400 per annum 
in Heu of a service of 50 horsemen, a tribute of Rupees 4,739 on account 
of certain rights inherited from the Rajahs of Satara, and some other small 
sums on account of rights in other collectorates. He also pays Rupees 959 to 
the Punt Prithee Nidhee from the revenues of certain villages. The popula- 
tion of the jaghire of the Duflay is 70,665; the revenue Rupees 83,640; 
and the area about 885 square miles. 

The Nimbalkur.— l:\ns is a very old family. They long held the district 
of Phulton under the Mahomedan rulers of Beejapore. Jan Rao, with whom 
the British Government formed an Engagement (No. CXXXVI.) in 1820 
died at a very advanced age in 1825. He was succeeded by Banaji Naik on 



340 The Satara Jaghiredars— The Waekur. 

payment of a nuzzerana of Rupees 30,000 to the Rajah of Satara. Banaji 
Naik died in 1841 when his widow was permitted to adopt the present Chief 
Moodajee Naik, now thirty-eight years of age, on which occasion a nuzzer- 
ana of Rupees 30,000 was paid to the Rajah of Satara. The jaghiredar 
pays Rupees 9,600 per annum in lieu of a service of 75 horse. His revenues 
amount to Rupees 1,27,578; the jaghire contains an area of 397 square 
miles; and a population of 59,124 souls. 

The Waelmr. — Shaik Meera of Waee was an infantry officer in the 
service of the Rajahs of Satara. On the return of Shahojee from imprison- 
ment Shaik Meera espoused his cause and was rewarded with the rent-free 
grant of the village of Piisurnee, a pension of Rupees 1,800 a month, and 
promotion to the command of 60 horsemen, for the maintenance for whom 
he held assignments to the amount of Rupees 40,000. The pension ceased 
on the death of the first Shaik Meera, and the revenue assignments have 
since fallen off to Rupees 18,000, which, with Pussurnee, are still held by 
the family under an Engagement (No. CXXXVII.) concluded in 1820. 

The present representative of the family, Shaik Khan Mahomed, is 
deeply involved in debt. The income of his lands is about Rupees 6,647, all 
of which, except a small subsistence allowance, is assigned to his creditors. 



The Satara Jaghiredars-Akulkote-No. CXXIX. & CXXX. 341 

No. CXXIX. 

Adoption SuNNtTD granted to the Eajah of Akulkote. 

Her Majesty being desirous that the Governments of the several 
Princes and Chiefs of India who now govern their own territories should be 
perpetuated, and that the representation and dignity of their Houses should 
be continued ; in fulfilment of this desire this Sunnud is given to you to con- 
vey to you the assurance that, on failure of natural heirs, the British Govern- 
ment will permit and confirm any adoption of a successor made by yourself 
or by any future Chief of your State that may be in accordance with Hindoo 
law and the customs of your race. 

Be assured that nothing shall disturb the engagement thus made to you 
so long as your House is loyal to the Crown and faithful to the conditions of 
the Treaties, grants, or engagements^ which record its obligations to the 
British Government. 

(Sd.) Canning. 

Bated Wth March 1863. 



Similar Sunnuds were granted to the Punt Prithee Nidhee, Punt Sucheo, 
the Nimbalkur, and the Duflay. 



No. CXXX. 



AaEEEMENT between the Honoueablb East India Company and the Rajah of Akul- 

KOTE, dated the 3rd July 1820. 



Seal of 

Captain J. 

Grant. 



Teems fixed by Captain James Geant, on the part of the HoNorBABLE Company, for 
Eao Sahib Meheeban Pijtteh Sing Eajah Bhonslay Akulkotkue. 

The jaghires, &c., held by you have come into the possession of the 
British Government along with the rest of the country. In consideration, 
however, of the antiquity and respectability of your family, whatever was 
held by you up to the war is, with the exception of the Mogulaee Umuls, not 
appertaining to the villages at present held by you, graciously restored to you 
by government. As your jaghires, &c., come within the limits of the terri- 
tory of His Highness the Rajah Chutruputee of Satara, according to the 
Treaty, you are to be considered a jaghiredar of His Highness' government. 
The following Articles are therefore agreed upon between you and the British 
Government : — 

Aeticle 1. 

Pergunnah Akulkote and other districts and umuls held by you up to the 
war, with the exception of the Mogulaee Umuls, not appertaining to the 



342 The Satara JagMredars— Akulkote— No. CXXX. 



villages at present held by you, are now restored to you and confirmed. 
During tlie government of the Peishwa you had to furnish a body of horse, 
but as you have been deprived of the Mogulaee Umuls, and as the jaghire 
territory is in a bad state, and as you should have enough for your own main- 
tenance, and for the expense of the contingent of horse to be kept in a com- 
plete state of equipment and in readiness to serve at all times of the year, 
government have dispensed with the former number and fixed the contingent 
at 100 horse, which must be constantly in the service of His Highness's 
government. 

Article 2. 

The horses and men forming ihe contingent are to be good. The horses, 
of the value of from Rupees 300 to 400, to be always present in the service 
of His Highness, and to proceed without delay or remonstrance wherever 
their services may be required. They are to be mustered whenever so ordered, 
and should there be any deficiency in the number, such deficiency must be 
made good at the annual rate of Rupees 300 each horse, to be calculated 
from the period of the former muster; but previous to enforcing the demand, 
a representation of the circxim stances will be made by His Highnesses 
government to the Agent of the British Government, and his concurrence 
obtained. 

Article 3. 

In the event of the contingent being employed in war under a requisition 

from the British Government, and should any men or horses in consequence 

be killed or wounded, it is to be clearly understood that nothing in the way 

of equivalent shall be paid by the government of His Highness ; risks and 

casualties of all kinds, as well as the furnishing of ammunition, are included 
in the allowance. 

Article 4. 

The whole expense^of managing the jaghire is to be defrayed without 
reference to what is incurred by keeping up to 4;he horse. As the territories 
of the British Government and of His Highness adjoin the jaghire, it is 
therefore determined that, in the event of any disturbance taking place in 
them, on the requisition of the mamledars of either government, aid shall be 
furnished by a ready co-operation with all the disposable police of the jaghire. 

Article 5. 

Whatever villages, wuttuns, &c., were held by you up to the war within 
the territories of the British Government or of His Highness, shall, with the 
exception of the Mogulaee Umuls not appertaining to the villages now held 
by you, be continued, and whatever items of revenue belonging to His High- 
ness's government may be within the jaghire, shall be continued to be paid. 
All doomala villages and lands, wurshasun, dhurmadaos, dewasthans, rozindars, 
khyrat, nemnooks, &c., and jaghire and karkoonee held by durukdars, within 
your mehals, must be continued on the same tenure as ditherto. Grants under 
government title deeds are to be continued ; notwithstanding the temporary 



Satara Jaghiredars— Akulkote— Wo. CXXX. 343 



interruption in regard to them, care must be taken that no cause of complaint 
may be brought forward in such points. In ease any of the persons holding 
the abovementioned rights shall behave improperly, or die without heirs, it 
will be necessary to acquaint the Agent of the British Government, who will 
intimate to His Highriess's government what course is to be pursued either 
in respect to the punishment or resumption, when His Highnesses govern- 
ment will adopt necessary measures. Should zemindars raise any disturbance 
against you, or commit any offence against the public peace, or should any 
one die without heirs, you will resume the wuttun as may seem expedient, 
and report the same to government, when His Highnesses government, with 
the advice of the Agent of the British Government, will send orders, which 
must be conformed to. 

Aeticlb 6. 
The inhabitants of the jaghire territory must be protected, justice pro- 
perly dispensed, and a good police upheld to detect thefts, murder, or disturb- 
ance, and suppress gang robberies.- If this is not attended to, and the 
country be without justice, so that people are obliged to complain, the 
government of His Highness, with the advice of the Agent of the British 
Government, having investigated the matter, will decide on such subjects, 
and their decisions must be attended to ; and further, should such decisions 
not be attended to, so that the country fall into a state of misgovernment, 
and robberies and other crimes become of very frequent occurrence, in such 
an event, whatever may appear to be the most proper measures shall be sug- 
gested by the Agent of the British Government, and corresponding arrange- 
ments will be made by His Highness's government. 

Article 7. 
Family dispute about your respective shares of property, which arose 
between you and Tooljajee Rajah Bhonslay, was settled in the time of Bajee 
Rao. and deeds of division were given by each of yOu. Agreeably to the 
same deeds, arrangeinents are made by the British Government; both of you 
should, therefore, abide by them. 

Article 8. 

Without orders from Government no extra troops are to be levied, and 
none assembled for the purpose of making war on any one. In matters of 
family disputes concerning relationship and such like, no appeal to arms 
can be permitted, but the case is to be represented to the Agent of the 
British Government, who will communicate with the government of His 
Highness, and whatever decision is given must be reckoned binding. 

Article 9. 
With the exception of persons under the government of His Highness, 
no intercourse or communication by letter is to be entered into with such 



344 Satara Jaghiredars— Akulkote— No. CXXX. 



parties as Bajee Rao Sahib^ or other Princes, Chieftains, Commanders, and 
others, nor is any aid or assistance by joining the troops of any one to be 
given. This Article forms the basis of the present agreement, and should 
what is written above be departed from, the jaghire will not be continued. 

Aeticle 10. 

All persons having committed crimes within the jaghire country, who 
may take shelter in the territories of the British Government or His High- 
ness, shall be delivered over to you, after information has been given to the 
Agent of the British Government, and by him communicated to the British 
Government, or to the government of His Highness, as the case may be; 
and, in like manner, all criminals from the territories of the British Govern- 
ment or of His Highness shall be apprehended and delivered up by you to 
their respective governments, and assistance must be rendered to people of 
either government who may be sent for the apprehension of such offenders. 



Aeticle 11. 

Whilst you shall continue to fulfil the terms of your service in good 
faith, integrity, and fidelity, your jaghire shall be continued without any 
interruption from His Highness's government : on this point the British 
Government is your guarantee. 

Aeticle 12. 

All titles and forms of respect hitherto enjoyed by you shall be conti- 
nued by the Agent of the British Government and His Highness's govern- 
ment. All requests on the part of the jaghiredar, which may be reasonable 
and proper, shall be granted, but such as are otherwise shall not be acceded to. 



Aeticle 13. 

As the jaghire districts adjoin the territory of His Highness, and it may 
be necessary to effect exchanges of items of revenue or land, for the purpose 
either of defining the boundary or for police arrangements, therefore, on a 
representation from the government of His Highness, the Agent of the 
British Government will arrange such exchanges as may be necessary, pro- 
vided they are not injurious to the interests of the jaghiredar, and such 
exchanges must be made accordingly. 

The above 13 Articles must be observed. 

Bated Srd July a.d. 1820, corresponding with 21«< Ramzan AMee-wn- 
JJshreen-wu-Myatein-wv,- Ulf. 

(Sd.) James Geant. 



L. s. 



The Satara Jaghiredars— Akulkote— No. CXXX. 345 



Ageeement entered into on the 11th July 1820 by His Highness the Rajah of Sataua 

with the Rajah of Akulkote. 



Large 


Seal 


of His 


Hish- 


ness the 


Raia 


of Satara. 



Agreement on the part of His Highness the Rajah of Sataea respecting Putteh Sing 
Bhonslat of Aktjlkote, to whom these orders are issued. 

The whole of the jaghireSj &e., en]*oyed by you have, with the rest of 
the eountryj reverted to the British Government; but as that government 
has been pleased, in consideration of the antiquity of your family, to guaran- 
tee to you the villages held up to the war, (including those situated in the 
Nizam^s country now in your possession,) save Mogulaee Umuls, by a Yiid 
of 13 paragraphs executed to you by Captain James Grant, the British Resi- 
dent; and as His Highness has received his country from the British Govern- 
ment according to Treaty, and your lands are situated therein. His Highness 
approves of the Yad executed to you by the British Government, and, for the 
continuance of your lands, determines as follows, viz. — 

Article 1. 
The pergunnah of Aknlkote and other mehals and umuls held by yo«. 
up to the war, (including the villages situated in the Nizam's country now 
in your possession), save Mogulaee Umuls, are hereby continued and confirmed 
to you. Formerly you had to maintain a contingent of horse for the service 
of the Peishwa's government, but as you have now been deprived of your 
umuls in the Nizam's country, and sustained loss in the mehals, His Highness, 
to enable you to support yourself and to keep the horse and men of your 
contingent in good order for service throughout the year, fixes the contingent 
at lUO horse, which you are to maintain for the service of the Satara State. 

Article 3. 
The contingent is to be efficient, the horses to be of the value from 
Rupees 300 to 400, and the men in a complete state of equipment. The 
contingent to be always kept present for the service of His Highness; they 
should attend muster when called upon, and proceed to whatever place directed, 
without delay or remonstrance. Should it appear, however, on muster that 
any number of the contingent is deficient. His Highness will, with the 
concurrence of the British Resident, oblige you to refund, in the proportion 
of Rupees 300 per annum a horse, for the whole period of such deficiency, 
according to the terms of the agreement entered into with you. 

Article 3. 

In the event of your contingent being employed in war by His Highness, 

with the concurrence of the British Resident, no remuneration on account 

of the wounded and slain will be granted ; but all such risks and casualties, 

as well as the supply of ammunition, are included in the grant. 

4,4 
IV ** 



346 The Satara Jaghiredars— Akulkote— No. CXXX. 



AUTICLB 4. 

You are to defray the expense of your village establishmentSj as well as of 
the contingent. Should any commotion or disturbance occur in the districts, 
either of His Highness the Rajahj or of the British Government, you are, 
on the requisition of the mamlutdars of either government, to aid and 
co-operate with them with the Police in your mehals. 

Article 5. 

The villages, inams, wuttuns, &c., in His Highness the Rajah's country 
held by you up to the war, together with the umuls and villages in the 
Nizam's country now in your possession, will be continued to you, this gov- 
ernment also retaining its umuls in your territory. All doomala villages, 
lands, wurshasuns, dhurmadaos, dewasthans, rozindars, khyrats, nemnooks, 
as also the jaghires of darukdars and karkoonee, &c., are to be continued to 
the several parties as heretofore, without objection, together with the lands 
held by virtue of Sunnuds, although they may have been on certain grounds 
placed under attachment. Should any of the parties enumerated above act 
improperly, or die intestate, you are to report the same to this government, 
when His Highness, with the concurrence of the British Resident, will 
award such punishment to the offender, or direct the resumption of the 
land, as may appear expedient. If any landholder creates a riot, or raises a 
rebellion in your country, or refuses to acknowledge your supremacy, or 
if a wuttundar dies intestate, you should attach his wuttun and report the 
matter to government, when His Highness, with the concurrence of the 
British Resident, will issue such orders as may appear expedient, and to which 
you are to conform accordingly. 

Article 6. 

You should endeavour to make your subjects happy, distribute justice 
impartially, and adopt measures for the prevention of theft, murder, and 
other crimes. If these are not done, and if justice is not administere^d 
properly, and complaints are made to this government. His Highness, rk 
conjunction with the_ British Resident, will enquire into the complaint, 
and issue such orders as may appear necessary, to which you are to conform ; 
but if you do not do so, and the country continue in a state of misgovern- 
ment, and crimes are of frequent occurrence, His Highness will, with the 
concurrence of the British Resident, adopt such preventive measures as may 
appear expedient to him. 

Article 7. 

During the administration of Bajee Rao Rughoonath a dispute having 
arisen between you and Tooljajee Bhonslay for division of property, the 
same was decided, and deeds of acquittance passed by you both, which are 
approved of and confirmed by this government, and you both are to abide by 
the same accordingly. 



Satara Jaghiredars— Akulkote— No. CXXX. 347 



Article 8. 

You should not, without the knowledge of this government, muster a 
force and engage in hostilities with any person. If any dispute arises among 
you respecting Bhaoopuna rights, &c., you should quietly refer the matter to 
this government, when His Highness, with the concurrence of the British 
Resident, will issue the necessary orders in the case, and to which you are to 
conform. 

Aeticlb 9. 
With the exception of the subjects of this government, you are to hold 
no intercourse nor to carry on correspondence with Bajee E.ao Rughoonath, or 
any other Prince or Chieftain. If you do, your country will be resumed. 

Article 10. 
Should an ofEender from your country take shelter within the territories 
of His Highness, you are to report the same to this government, when 
measures will be taken to apprehend the offender and make him over to you. 
In like manner offenders from the territories of His Highness or of the British 
Government, taking shelter within your mehals, should be immediately appre- 
hended and delivered up by you to whichever government they may belong. 
Further, you are to aid and assist the officers of either government who may 
enter your jurisdictiou in pursuit of offenders. 

Article 11. 
So long as you continue in good faith and render faithful service, your 
mehals, &c., will be continued to you uninterruptedly by this government, for 
which you have the guarantee of the British Government, and which is agreed 
to by His Highness. 

Article 12. 
All titles and customary forms of respect hitherto enjoyed by you shall 
be continued. You are to represent all your affairs to this government ; such 
requests as are reasonable will be granted, and such as are not will be refused. 

Article 13. 

As the country of His Highness adjoins your territory, it might be 
necessaiy at a future period to effect certain territorial exchanges, with the 
advice of the British Resident, for the good of the country, and for the pur- 
pose of defining distinctly the boundaries of the two governments, care being 
taken to secure you from loss. You are required to agree to this arrange- 
ment. 

Article 14. 

You are to attend on His Highness annually, at the celebration of the 
Dussera festival, as also at other times when your presence may be required. 
You are also to accompany His Highness whenever he may proceed on a long 
journey. 



348 Satara Jaghiredars— Punt Sucheo— Wo. CXXXI. 



The circumstances contained in the foregoing 14 paragraphs are eon- 
firmed. 



Small Seal 

of the Rajah 

of Satara. 



Baled the ZQth Bamzan Soor Sun Ahdee-wu-JJshreen-wu-Myatein-wn-JJlf, 
corresponding with the Wth July a.d. 1820. 



No. CXXXI. 

Ageeement with the Punt Sucheo, dated 22nd April 1820. 



Seal of 
Captain 
Grant. 



Teems fixed by Captain Jambs Gbant Sahib Bahadooe on the part of the Honouk- 
ABLE Company Bahadooe with Rao Sahib Mooshpuck Meheeban Chimnajee 
Pundit Sucheo. 

The possessions of the Punt Sucheo came under the British Government 
along with the rest of the country, but the antiquity and respectability 
of the family having been duly considered, the British Government have 
freely bestowed and made over to him the whole of his possessions as 
formerly held up to the war, with the exception of his possessions within the 
territory of the Nizam. The districts of the Punt being within the limits 
of the territory made over by Treaty to His Highness the Rajah of Satara, 
the Punt, therefore, is placed under the government of His Highness. The 
British Government is the guarantee, and the terms are fixed as follows : — 

\st. — That the inhabitants of the country under the Punt Sucheo may 
be protected, justice must be properly administered, and a proper police 
established for the prevention and detection of thieves and robbers; but if 
this is not attended to and people are obliged to bring forward complaints in 
consequence of the want of police and justice, in that case, whatever 
orders may be given on the subject by His Highness's government, with 
the advice of the Agent of the British Government, must be carried into 
effect. 

%nd. — An effective police must be established in the country of the 
Punt Sucheo sufiicient to prevent any inhabitants of his districts from 
committing robberies within the territories of the British Government or of 
His Highness, and whenever stolen property may be pointed out within 
the country of the Punt, or thieves traced into it, both the property and the 
thief must be delivered over to whichever of the governments may demand 



Satara Jaghiredars— Punt Sueheo— No. CXXXI. 349 



them, and assistance must be afforded to officers of eitlier government who 
may be sent for the apprehension of criminals and offenders. In the event 
of a failure in these respects taking place, all arrangements made by tlie 
government of His Highness, at the recommendation of the Agent of the 
British Government, must be carried into effect. 

^rd. — Excepting those under the government of His Highness, no 
intercourse or communication by letter can be allowed with any Chiefs, such 
as Bajee Rao Sahib or other Princes, Chieftains, Commanders, and others, 
nor is it permitted to send aid to any one whatever. This Article forms the 
basis of the agreement ; and if it is departed from, all advantages appertain- 
ing to the Punt by virtue of the present agreement shall be forfeited. 

4itA. — Without the knowledge and permission of government no extra 
troops are to be levied, or war entered with any one. In all domestic disputes 
about relationship, and such like, no appeal to arms will be permitted, but 
information is to be sent to the Agent of the British Government, who will 
communicate with the government of His Highness and the decisions given 
in consequence must be attended to. 

bth. — In the event of disputes occurring relative to items of revenue 
which belong to the Punt Sucheo in the countries of the Putwurdhuns and 
others, intelligence must be given to the Agent of the British Government, 
after which proper arrangements will be made, but no separate communication 
by letter is ever to be made. 

&th. — As the country of the Punt Sucheo is surrounded by the territories 
of the British Government and of His Highness, it may be necessary to make 
exchanges on account of police arrangements, or for the defining of boun- 
daries; therefore such exchanges shall take place provided they are not 
injurious to the Punt. 

1th. — A yearly payment of ten thousand Rupees was made by the 
Punt Sucheo to the government of the Peishwa as an allowance for 
elephants, but the village of Sonapore having been taken by the Peishwa's 
o-overnment, and which at present is in the possession of the British 
Government, therefore a deduction of Rupees 1,000 is allowed, and 
the annual payment fixed at Rupees 9,000 to the government of His High- 
ness as follows : — 

A payment of Eupees 2,000 annually made by the Puni Prithee Bupees. 
Nidhee to the Punt Sucheo is now transferred to His 
Highness ... ... ... .■• ... 2,000 

Amount enam payments from the hoozoor mamla of Karar, 
foriiierly paid to the Punt and now transferred to His 
Highness ... ... ... ... - 1,000 

A cash payment to he made yearly by the Punt to His Highness' 
government ; items of revenue or villages to be made over 
to the government of His Highness as may be arranged by 
the Agent of the British Government to the amount of ... 6,000 

Total ,.. 9,000 



350 Satara Jaghiredars— Punt Sueheo— No. CXXXI. 



%th. — All doomalla, dhurmadaoj enams, wurshasun^ dewasthanj rozindar, 
nemnookj daruk, and such like allowances which at present exist within the 
territory of the Punt, must be continued to their holders ; there must be no 
occasion for complaints on these points. 

^th. — As the country of the Punt is surrounded by the territories of the 
British Government and of His Highness, it is therefore required that, in 
the event of disturbances taking place, every assistance be given on the 
requisition of the mamlutdars of either of the governments. 

IQtk. — At the annual festival of the Dusserah, the Punt Sucheo must 
always appear in person under the government of His Highness. All titles 
and honors hitherto enjoyed by the Punt Sucheo shall be continued. In all 
ten Articles, which must not be departed from. 

Bated %%nd Ap-il 1820, corresponding with the ^th Rujjtil Sunnut 
AsTireen-wu-Myatein-wu-Vlf, or Arabic year 1220, at Satara. 

(Sd.) James Geant. 



Ageeement entered into in July 1820 by His Highness the Rajah of Sataea with the 

Punt Sucheo. 



Large Seal 
of His High- 
ness the 
Bajah of 
Satara. 



Ageeement on the part of His Highness the Eajah of Sataea respecting Eajeshebb 
Chimnajee Pundit Sucheo, to whom these commands are issued. 

The country formerly possessed by you has been freely restored and 
bestowed through the liberality of the British Government, and an agree- 
ment, consisting of ten Articles, has been made out and delivered to you by 
Captain James Grant Bahadoor, on the part of the British Government. 
Your country has come within the limits of the territory made over to His 
Highness by the Treaty with the British Government, and the terms fixed 
by the British Government having been approved of, the hoozoor, for the 
purpose of confirming you in possession, has determined as follows : — 

Aeticle 1. 

Should any disturbances take place in the territories of His Highness or 
of the British Government which adjoin your country, aid must be afforded, 
by sending all the disposable police in your district, on the requisition of the 
mamlutdars of either governments. 

Aeticle 2. 

All wuttun and other allowances hitherto possessed by you within the 
territory of His Highness shall be continued; and in like manner, all items 
of revenue belonging to His Highness' Government within your country 



Satara Jaghiredars— Punt Sueheo— No. CXXXI. 351 



sball continue to be paid; all doomala villages and lands, wurshasuns, 
dhurmadaos, dewasthans, rozindars, khyrats, uemnooksj duruksj and all other 
allowances hitherto enjoyed within your country, must be continued without 
interruption; and should at present any investigation be carried on respecting 
the rights or possessions of those holding them on government deeds, decisions 
must be given upon the fixed principles of justice, so that no complaints may be 
made. Should persons holding inheritances of the abovementioned description 
raise or exeits disturbances, or commit offences against the public peace, 
or should persons possessed of such inheritances die without heirs, you will 
fully investigate the matter and state what may appear really just, when 
His Highness's government, with the advice of the Agent of the British 
Government, will send such orders as may appear fit, which must be eon- 
formed to. 

AUTICLE 3. 

That the inhabitants of your country may be protected, justice must be 
honestly administered, and a proper police must be established for the preven- 
tion and detection of thieves and robbers; but if this is not attended to, and 
unjust decisions given, or thefts and robberies become of so frequent occur- 
rence, so that people may be obliged to bring forward complaints, in that case, 
whatever orders may, in consequence, be issued by His Highness's government 
with the advice of the Agent of the British Government, these must be 
carried into effect. 

Article 4. 

Without the knowledge and orders of government no extra troops are to 
be levied or war entered upon with any one. In all cases of domestic disputes 
about relationship and such like, no appeal to arms will be permitted, but 
information is to be sent to government, when such orders as may be sent on 
the subject, Tvith the advice of the Agent of the British Government, must be 
considered binding. 

AUTICLE 5. 

Excepting those under the government of His Highness, no intercourse 
or communication by letter can be allowed with any Chiefs, such as Bajee 
Rao Sahib, or other Princes, Chieftains, Commanders, and others, nor is it 
permitted to send aid to any one, or to become concerned in any assemblage of 
troops whatever. This Article forms the basis of the present agreement, and 
if it is departed from, with the advice of the British Government, your 
possession shall not be continued. 

Article 6. 
All offenders and criminals from your country, who may take shelter in 
the territory of His Highness, shall be delivered over to you ; and in like 
manner all offenders and criminals from the territories of His Highness, or of 
the British Government, who may enter your territory, shalll be given up and 
delivered over to whichever government they belong ; and assistance must be 
rendered to all ofiicers or people of both governments who may go into your 
district in pursuit of such offenders. 



352 Satara Jaghiredars— Punt Sucheo— No. CXXXI. 



Article 7. 

Whilst you remain and perform the conditions of your service in good 
faith J integrity, and fidelity, your possessions shall be continued without inter- 
ruption on the part of His Highnesses government, and on this point the 
British Government is your guarantee, which His Highnesses government 
approves of and agrees to. 

AUTICLB 8. 

All titles and honors formerly enjoyed by you shall be continued, and all 
requests forwarded by you shall be attended to, and if reasonable and proper, 
they will be granted, but if otherwise, rejected. 

Akticle 9. 

As your country adjoins the territory of His Highness, and it may be 
necessary in consequence to effect exchanges, either for the purpose of defining 
boundaries for police arrangements, or for settling revenue matters, therefore 
such exchanges shall be made with the advice of the Agent of the British 
Government, provided they are not injurious to your interests. 

Article 10. 

You must appear in personal attendance yearly at the festival of the 
Dussera, and also be present on all occasions of ceremony or congratulation, 
when your attendance may be required by His Highness ; you must also 
attend in person whenever the establishment of His Highness may move to 
any great distance. 

Article 11. 

A yearly payment of ten thousand Rupees was made by you to govern- 
ment on account of elephant establishment, but the village of Sonapore 
having come into the possession of government, a deduction of one thousand 
Rupees is allowed in consequence, and the payment of the balance is to be 
made as follows : — 

A, payment made annually to you by Purushram Pundit Rupees. 
Prithee Nidhee, whict is now transferred to His Higli- 
ness' government ... ... ... ... 2 000 

Payment formerly made to you from the hoozoor mamla 
of Prant Kurar, now transferred to His Highness' 
government ... ... ... ... 1000 

A cash payment to he made yearly hy you to His High- 
ness' government or items of revenue, land, or vil- 
lages as may be arranged by the Agent of the British 
Government, to the amount of , . , ... 6 000 



Total ... 9,000 
Daied July 1820. 



Satara Jaghiredars— Punt Sueheo— No. CXXXII. 



353 



No. CXXXII. 



Small Seal of 

His Highness 

the Bajah of 

Satara. 



Agreement for an intevchatige of territory between the Honotteable the East India 
Company and the Punt Sucheo of Sataea, dated the 12th April 1830, with Schedule 
annexed. 

Article 1. 

Whereas a mutual interchange of territory between the British Govern- 
ment and the Punt Sucheo has been agreed upon, according to the jumma- 
bundeeof the year Soorsun Suman-wu Ushreen Myatein-wu-Ulf (a. d. 1827-28) 
after the deductions of purbhara and itlak (alinations, pensions, &c., &c.,) and 
tota khurch (the amount which cannot be realized) to have effect from the 1st 
of May 1829; and on the 13th of November 1829 a memorandum was pre- 
pared of the country to be transferred, in which certain items remained for 
adjustment : the following settlement has therefore been determined on : — 

Amount of revenue of the country transferred by the British Government 
to the Punt Sucheo, as by the memorandum of the 13th November 
1829 ... ... ... ... ... "• Ks. 33,556 2 83 

Deduct — 

The produce of the jungle toddy trees (raeemar) of the following villages 
which have been retained by the Honourable Company : — 

No. of Eaees. 
Mouza Wangnee ... ... 1 



Sookelee 
Eabgaon 
Wasgaon 
Pigonde 



Ks. 45 2 



The tax from persons fishing in the Tarn Doho, 
situated within the boundaries of mouza Tam- 
solee, of the Nagotna turruf, which is retained 
by the Honourable Company, and was erroneously 
included in the Mohturfa of Mamie Palee 

The proportion of the value of the honey produced 
on the Raees mentioned above 

The transit duties, and those on salt, at the Nafta 
of Oomurkhind, which has been retained by the 
Honourable Company, and was erroneously in- 
cluded in the former memorandum ... 



Total transferred by the Honourable Company to the Punt Sucheo, Es, 32,840 1 09 
IV 45 



35 







3 







132 


3 74 


216 1 74 







354 



Satara Jaghiredars— Punt Sucheo— No. CXXXII. 



Transferred in lieu of revenue belonging to the 
Punt's jagHre 

Ditto ditto belonging to tbe 
Punt on account of Sahotra and Mokasa : — 

MouzaJhamp' ,.. ... ... Es, 

„ Waololee ... ... ... „ 

„ Targaon ... ... ... „ 

,, Kasul ... ... ,., ,, 



29,317 3 05 



1,119 


1 22 


736 


3 26 


124 


2 44 


1,041 


3 12 



3,022 2 04 



32,340 1 09 



Amount of revenue transferred by the Punt Sucheo to the Honourable 

Company as by the memorandum of the 13th Kovemher 1820 ... 
Amount to be added to the Punt's revenue of the twelve villages of the 

Shee Mehal retained by the Honourable Company in consequence of 

a mistake in the Koolkurnees' accounts, . . 
Amount to be added in consequence of the alienations from the Punt's 

revenue in the Nagotna turruf having been erroneously twice deducted 
Amount awarded to the Punt Sucheo in lieu of all claims in consequence 

of certain items which have been disallowed ... 



Deduct — Twrruf Nagotna. 

Amount overcharged in the Punt's accounts on the 

price of batty straw Es. 131 3 94 

Ditto ditto in the tax on mUoh cattle ... ... „ 37 2 06 

Ditto ditto in the quarternal receipts from the 

zemindars of turruf Nagotna ... ,,, „ 118 1 96 

„ 287 3 96 
Overcharge in the receipts from the zemindars of 

turruf Ashtumee ... ,., ... 12 2 80 



Es. 32,522 42 



280 1 34 

187 1 11 

51 98 



300 2 76 



Total transferred by the Punt Sucheo to the Honourable Company Es. 32,740 1 09 

Eevenue belonging to the Punt's jaghire ... ... Es. 29,723 3 40 

Eevenue derived from the Sahotra and Mokasa : — 

Sahotra ... ... Es. 1,329 01 

Mokasa ... ... „ 1,687 1 68 

3,016 1 69 

■ 32,740 1 09 

Abstract. 



Transferred by the Honoura/ble Company to the Punt Sucheo,.. 
Ditto by the Punt Sucheo to the Honourable Company 



Es. 32,840 1 09 
„ 32,740 1 09 



Balance in favor of the Punt Sucheo to be paid annually in cash its. 400 



Article 2. 
The country producing revenue to the above amount of Rupees 32,340-1-0-9 
Las thus been transferred, in full sovereignty, by the Honourable Company 



Satara Jaghiredars— Punt Suoheo— No. CXXXII. 



355 



to the Puut SucheOj in lieu o£ revenue belonging to that Chieftain, amounting, 
as above, to Rupees 32,740-1-09, and the balance Rupees 400 is to be paid 
annually in cash to the Punt. 

Settled on the part of the Honourable Company by L. R. Reid, Esq., 
Principal Collector and Magistrate of the Konkan, and on that of the Punt 
by his Vakeels, Ragho Appajee Mokuddum and Pandoorung Gungadhur 
Gunpoole, and signed this 18th of Shawul, the 5th of Chintru "Vud, Shuke 
1752 (the 12th of April a. d. 1830). 



(Sd.) L. R, Reid, Principal Collector. 
„ Ragho Appajee Mokuddum. 

„ Pandoorung Gungadhue Gunpoole. 



Papee containing the Paeticulaes of the Teansfee of Teeeitoey alluded to in Article I. 

of the Ag-eeement. 

Schedule of villages of Turrufs Falee and Shee Mehal, in which the Honourable Com- 
pany's rights have been made over to the Pwnt Sucheo in entire sovereignty. 



Mamle Paleb. 

1. The Kusha or town of Palee. 

Turruf Huwelee. 



2. Mouza Oodhur. 

3. „ Targaon. 

4. „ Pursure. 

6. „ Khandpolee. 
6. „ Bhymo. 



7. Mouza Waw^.- 

8. „ Easul. 

9. „ Ambnole. 

10. „ Dapore. 

11. „ Waghosee. 



Turruf Asre Adharne. 



12. Mouza Ghotnore. 

13. „ Wawe. 

14. „ Wasonde. 

15. ., Mangaon Boozoorg. 



16. Mouza Mongaon Khoord. 

17. „ Muzve Sawe. 

18. „ Bheleew. 

19. „ Phulian. 



20. Mouza Jhamp. 



Turruf Antone. 

I 21. Mouza Wawlolee. 

22. Mouza Boorinbalee. 



, ,; ^ 

356 Satara Jaghiredars— Punt Sucheo— No. CXXXII. 






Ttjeeuf Shee Mehal. 








Turruf Asree Adharne. 




1. 


Mouza KondgaJjn. 




14. 


Muzree Hednolee. 


2. 


„ Ambegaon. 




15. 


Mouza Wurar. 


3. 


„ Wanrosee. 




16. 


s> 


Kurchonde. 


4,. 


Muzree Nuogur. 




17. 


is 


Nanose 


5. 


Mouza Kanhiwlee. 




18. 


J> 


Purgholee. 


6. 


„ Tiwree. 




19. 


ff 


Amnoree. 


7. 


„ Pernlee. 




20. 


tt 


BuHgaon. 


8. 


„ Kansul. 




21.. 


If 


Gondao. 


9. 


Kusba Asree. 




22. 


13 


Chindurgaon. 


10. 


Mouza Moolshee. 




23. 


» 


Hatond. 


11. 


„ Kulumb. 




24. 


l> 


Mahagaon. 


12. 


„ Hurneree. 




25. 


1) 


Purlee (inam). 


13. 


„ Kistwur. 




26. 


>! 


Dhoksbet. 






27. Muzree Dondiwlee 










Turruf Antone. 






28. 


Moiiza Kursamle. 




40. 


Mouza Nandgaon. 


29. 


„ Nennalee. 




41. 


1) 


Gomasee. 


30. 


„ Pimplolee. 




42. 


t> 


Potluj Khoovd. 


31. 


„ Nagove. 




43. 


It 


Potluj Boozoorg. 
Adoolsee . 


32. 


„ Nagshet. 




44. 


»> 


33. 


Kusba Antone. 




45. 


ij 


Bharje (inam). 


34. 


Mouza Kulenbosee. 




46. 


» 


Ambnolee. 


35. 


„ Bulke. 




47. 


)) 


Amtnonee. 


36. 


„ Chinchaolee. 




48. 


,) 


Sidheshwur Khoord. 


37. 


„ Kaudule. 




49. 


j> 


Sidbesbwur Boozoorg. 


38. 


„ Gondule. 




50. 


jj 


Pooee. 


39. 


„ Googoolwara. 




51. 


» 


Kbendsnee. 






52. MouzQ Narsoor. 








Turruf Suwelee. 






53. 


Mouza Oosale. 




59. 


Mouza Kuvelee. 


54. 


„ Cbive. 




60. 


» 


Wafegur. 


55. 


Muzree Jumpoobara. 




61. 


» 


Virsnee. 


56. 


„ Bhilpara. 




62. 


f> 


Kurnujgur. 


57. 


Mouza Aondhe. 




63. 


t) 


Khnolee (inam). 


58. 


„ Koombbargur 




64. 


>j 


Murbalee. 






Abstkact. 






Mamie Palee 


... 


a . . 


... Villages 22 


Turruf Shee Mehal 


... 


... 


... • „ 64 
86 


Southern Konkan ; "^ 






Collectoe's Office, [ 






(Sd.) L. K. Keid, 

Collector. 


nth No 


vember 1829. ) 

of Villages of Maml 




Shee 1 


Schedule 


e Palee and Turruf 


Wehal retained by the Honour- 






able Company. 










Mamle Palee. 










Twruf Huwelee 






1. 


Mouza Sbilosee. 




5. 


Mouza Oonere Boozoorg. 


2. 


„ Rabgaon. 




6. 


}) 


Oornere Kboord. 


3. 


„ Balhap. 
„ Chikulgaon. 




7. 


,, 


Pilosree. 


4. 




8. 


i> 


Khoombarsbet (inam). 



Satara Jaghiredars— Punt Sucheo— No. CXXXII. 



357 



9. Mouza Oomre. 
10. „ Chawanee. 



1. Mouza Wuzrolee. 



3. Mouza Shene. 

4. „ Virane. 

5. „ Nanegaon. 



10. Mouza Erul. 



Mamie Pake 
TurrufSheeMehal 



Tm ruf Asre Adharne. 

I 11. Mouza Tooksnee. 

I 12. „ Doorshet. 

13. Mouzah Nere. 

TuBEUF Sheb Mehal. 
Twrrvf Suwelee. 

I 2. Mouza Pimplolee'. 

Twrruf Asree AdAarue. 

6. Mouza Adharne. 

7. „ Hetuone. 

8. „ Tilhere. 
9. Mouza Wurnone. 

Turruf Antone. 

I 11. Muzree Kamthe. 

12. Muzree Dhugarwaree. 

Absteact. 



Villages 13 
., 12 

25 



southeen konkan ; 
Collectoe's Opeice, 
I2tk Nwember 1829. 



(Sd.) L. E. Keid, 

Collector. 



Statement of the amount of revenue mutually transferred hetween'the British Government 
and the Punt Sucheo, framed according to the accounts of the year a.d. 1827-28, 
Soorsun Suman-wu- Ushreen-vm-Myatein-wu- JJlf. 

Made over by the Honourahle Company to the Punt Sucheo in fuH 
sovereignty, 22 villages of Mamie Palee ... 

The Company's share of 64 villages of turruf Shee Mehal ... 

Land customs, including transit duties on salt within the above tract' , . . 



Made over by the Punt Sucheo to the Honourable Company : 
The Punt's share of the revenue in turruf Nagotna . . , 
The same in turruf Ashtumee ... 
The same in 12 villages in turruf Shee Mehal 



Balance in favor of the British Government 

SotJTHBEN EONKAN ; ) 

, „ f (Sd.) 

COLLECTOE 8 OFFICE, >■ 

12a November 1829. ) 



Ks. 

99 


11,553 

15,854 

5,148 


1 65 
3 89 
1 29 


Es. 


32,556 


2 83 


Es. 

5) 


18,375 

13,122 

1,023 


2 52 

3 22 
2 68 


Es. 


32,522 


42 


» 


34 


2 41 


L. E 


. Eeid, 
Collector. 



358 Satara Jaghiredars— Punt Sueheo— No. CXXXIII. 



No. CXXXIII. 

Agebement between the Honoueable East India Compant and the Pttnt Suchbo 

dated the 3rd February 1839. 

The late Punt Sueheo Rughoonath Rao having on his death-bed adopted 
the son of his half-brother, Ramjee Appa, as his heir, which adoption, after 
a full consideration of the case, the Right Honourable the Governor General 
of India has been pleased to recognise, and orders having been received to 
this effect from the Honourable the Governor in Council of Bombay, as well 
as that the present heir, Chimnajee Rughoonauth, being of tender years, a 
Karbaree should be appointed to manage the affairs of the jaghire, a commu- 
nication was transmitted to Bhore on this subject, and in accordance with this 
communication, Damodur Moreshwar, Venkajee Rungnath, and Sudasheo 
Khundi Rao, having waited on the Resident with full powers to make the 
arrangements pointed out by Government, the following Articles are hereby 
agreed to by the undersigned on the part of Chimnajee Rughoonath Punt 
Sueheo: — 

Aeticlb 1. 
By the 1st and 2nd Articles of' the Treaty between the British Govern- 
ment and the Punt Sueheo, under date the '22nd April 1820, the Punt is 
bound to provide for the establishment, in his jaghire, of a good police; as 
also that whenever stolen property may be pointed out within the country of 
the Punt, or thieves traced into it, both the property and the thief must be 
delivered over to whichever of the governments may demand them, and 
assistance must be afforded to the officers of either government who may be 
sent for the apprehension of criminals and offenders. In elucidation of this 
Article, it is now alsD agreed that the Punt fully recognises the right of the 
officers of the British Government to enter his territory in pursuit of offen- 
ders and stolen property ; that he will aid these officers to the utmost of his 
ability in the performance of this duty ; and that all such offenders and stolen 
property will be given up without demur to the British Government. All 
such evidence, &c., also as may be required for the trial of British subjects 
before British Courts, for crimes committed in the Punt's country, are imme- 
diately to be forwarded, as pointed out by the British authorities. 

Article 2. 
_ It is also hereby understood and agreed to by the Punt that the entire 
jurisdiction, civil and criminal, of the village of Payet, of the Poona zillah, 
and of the kusba of Neeghoz, of the Ahmednuggur zillah, shall be ceded 
to the British Government. These two villages being surrounded by the 
Company's territory, and quite detached from that of the Punt Sueheo, 
justice will henceforward be administered according to the rules and regula- 
tions in force in the British territory. 

Article 3. 
Whereas, for the promotion of trade and commerce, the British Govern- 
ment has abolished all transit duties, the Punt Sueheo, with the same object, 



Satara Jaghiredars— Punt Suchoo— Wo. CXXXIII. 359 



consents to abolish those levies within his territories. The Punt also hereby 
agrees to adopt the same system as may be adopted by the British Govern- 
ment with respect to the compensation to be granted to all parties possessing 
huks on the duties to be abolished by this Article. 

Article 4. 

It is also understood and agreed to that the settlement made by the 
late Rughoonath Rao Punt Sucheo with the bankers, for the payment of the 
debts of the estate, is to be strictly adhered to, and that no further debt is 
to be contracted on any account whatever without the sanction of the British 
Government. 

Article 5. 

It is also understood and agreed to that the annual allowances of Radha 
Bai and Bhuwanee Bai, the grandmother and mother of the late Punt Sucheo, 
are to be .duly paid in the same manner as during the lifetime of Rughoonath 
Rao. 

Article 6. 

It is also hereby declared and agreed to by the Punt Sucheo that the 
Company's Rupee shall be the current coin within the Punt's territory in the 
same manner as in the Company's country. 

Article 7. 

The undersigned having been named by Gungabai Sucheo as Karbarees 
for the management of the estate, they hereby agree that they will faithfully 
and honestly discharge their duty so as to give satisfaction to the British 
Government, to the Punt, and inhabitants at large ; yearly accounts of the 
receipts and disbursements of the jaghire are also to be rendered. And it is 
clearly understood that these Karbarees may be removed or changed as Gov- 
ernment may deem expedient. 

Article 8. 

Finally, it is understood, that the above agreement refers to the territory 
of the Punt Sucheo within British jurisdiction. 

In all, the eight Articles, as set forth, are agreed to. 

Stmnut Tissa-wu-SuUaseen-wu-Mi/atein-wu-JJlfthe 11 th of Zilkad, th& 'drd 
of February 1839. 

(Sd.) Damodur Moreshwur Gandbkur, in his own hand-writing. 
„ Venkajee Rungnath, in his own hand-writing. 

„ SuDASHEO Khunde Rao, in his own hand- writing. 

Approved and confirmed by the Bombay Government on the 16th Fe- 
bruary 1839, and by the Right Honourable the Governor General of India 
on the Stli April following. 



360 Satara Jaghiredars— Punt Prithee Nidhee— No. CXXXIV. 

No. CXXXIV. 

Agebement between the HonoueabIe East India Company and the Punt Peithee 
NiDHBE, of Sataka, dated the 22nd April 1820. 



Seal 

of 

Captain 

J. Grant. 



Teems fixed by Captain James Grant Sahib Bahadooe, on the part of the Honoue- 
ABLE Company, for Kao Sahib Mushfuk Mehbbban Pueasheam Pundit Peithee 
NidheS. 

The possessions of the Punt Prithee Nidhee came into the possession 
of the British Government along with the rest of the country ; but in eon- 
eideration of the antiquity and respectability of the family, they have been 
freely restored in the same manner as they were held up to the period of the 
war. But as the greater part of the country of the Prithee Nidhee is within 
the limits of the territory made over by Treaty to His Highness the Rajah 
of Satara, the Prithee Nidhee therefore is placed under the government of 
His Highness. 

The British Government is the guarantee, and the terms fixed are as 
follows ; — 

Article 1. 

That the inhabitants of the country under the Pirthee Nidhee may be 
protected, justice must be properly administered, and a police established 
for the prevention and detection of thieves and robbers. Should justice not 
be honestly dispensed, and thefts and' robberies, from the inefficiency of the 
police, become so frequent that people may be obliged to complain ; in the 
event of such being the case, the government of His Highness will, with 
the advice and assistance of the Agent of the British Government, issue 
directions on the subject which must be attended to. 

Article 2. 

An efficient Police must be established, so that no inhabitants of the 
country under the Punt Prithee Nidhee may commit thefts or robberies 
within the territories of the British Government or of His Highness. Should 
at any time stolen property be found, or thefts traced by Magistrate within 
the country of the Punt Prithee Nidhee, the thief and stolen property 
must be made over to whichever government may demand them. People 
of either government, who may enter the country of the Prithee Nidhee 
for the purpose of apprehending criminals and other offenders must have 
every assistance given to them. If this is not attended to, then whatever 
appears to be the proper measures shall be suggested by the Agent of the 
British Government, and corresponding arrangements will be made by His 
Highness's government. 



Satara Jaghiredars— Punt Prithee Nidhee— No. CXXXIV. 361 



Article 3. 

Excepting those under the government of His Highness, no intercourse 
or communication by letter can be allowed with any Chiefs, such as Bajee 
Rao Sahib, or other Princes, Chieftains, Commanders, and others, nor is it 
permitted to give aid or assistance to any one. This Article is the basis 
of the present agreement, and a departure from it will occasion the forfeiture 
of all advantages possessed by virtue of this agreement. 

Article 4. 

Without the tnowledge and orders of government no extra troops are to 
be entertained or war entered upon with any one. In all cases of domestic 
disputes about relationship and such like, no appeal to arms can be permitted, 
but information must be sent to the Agent of the British Government, who 
will represent the affair to the government of His Highness, and such decision 
as, with his advice, shall be given, must be reckoned binding. 

Article 5. 
In tbe event of disputes taking place regarding items of revenue 
possessed by the Prithee Nidhee witlyn the districts of the Putwurdhun or 
others, information of the particulars must be sent to the Agent of the 
British Government, when a settlement will take place in conseq[uence; but 
no separate communication is to be made. 

Article 6. 

As the country of the Prithee Nidhee adjoins the territories of the 
British Government and of His Highness, it may be necessary to. make 
exchanges for the purpose of correctly defining the boundary, or on account 
of police arrangements, but such exchanges shall be made in a manner not 
injurious to the interests of the Punt. 

Article 7. 
The sum of Rupees two thousand (3,000) formerly paid yearly by the 
Prithee Nidhee to the Punt Sucheo has been made over by him to the 
government of His Highness, to whom it must, accordingly, be paid 
annually. 

Article 8. 

All allowances in the country of the Prithee Nidhee, such as doomala, 
dhurmadao, inams, wurshasuns, dewasthan, rozindar, nemnook, duruk, and 
others of the like kind, must be continued as they at present exist : there 
ought to be no complaints on this head. 

Article 9. 
As the British territories and those of His Highness adjoin the country 
of the Prithee Nidhee, it is necessary that in all cases of disturbance occur- 
ring in them, assistance shall be rendered on the requisition of the mamlut- 
dars of either government. 

IV 46 



362 Satara Jaghiredars— Punt Prithee Widhee— No. CXXXIV. 

Article 10. 

The Punt Prithee Nidhee must appear in personal attendance on His 
Highness yearly at the festival of the Dusserah. All titles and customary 
forms of respect hitherto enjoyed shall be continued to the Punt, 

In all 10 ArticleSj as above, which must be observed. 

Dated at Satara^ the ZZnd April 1820, corresponding with 8th HuJJub 
Sunnut TIshreen-vm-Myatein-wu-Ulf, or Arabic year 1230. 

(Sd.) James Gkant. 



Ageebment between the Kajah of Sataka and the Punt Pbithee Nidhee, Jnly 1820. 



Seal 
of His High- 
ness the 
Rajah of 
Satara. 



Ageeement on the part of His Highness the Eajah of Sataea respecting Eajeseee 
PuETJSHEAM PuNDiT Peithee Nidheb, to whom these commands are issued. 

The country formerly possessed by you has been freely restored and 
bestowed through the liberality of the British Government, and an agree- 
ment, consisting of 10 Articles, has been made out and delivered to you by 
Captain James Grant Sahib Bahadoor on the part of the British Government. 
The greater part of your country has come within the limits of the territory 
made over to His Highness by the Treaty with the British Government, and 
the terms fixed by the British Government having been approved of, the 
Hoozoor, for the purpose of confirming you in possession, has determined as 
follows : — 

Article 1. 
Should any disturbances take place in the territories of His Highness 
or of the British Government which adjoin your country, aid must be 
afforded by sending all the disposable police in your districts on requisition 
from the mamlutdars of either government. 

Article 2. 

All wuttun and other allowances hitherto possessed by you within the 
territory of His Highness shall be continued, and in like manner all items of 
revenue belonging to His Highness's government within your country must 
be continued to be paid. AH doomalla villages and land, wurshasuns, 
dhurmadao, dewasthan, rozindar, khyrat, nemnook, duruk, and all other 
allowances hitherto enjoyed within your country must be continued without 
interruption, and should at present any investigation be carrying on respect- 
ing the rights or possessions of those holding them on government deeds, 



Satara Jaghiredars— Punt Prithee Nidhee— No. CXXXIV. 363 



decisions must be given upon the fairest principles of justice/ so that no 
complaints may be made. Should persons holding inheritances of the above- 
mentioned descriptions raise or excite disturhancesj or commit ofEences against 
the public peace> or should persons possessed of such inheritances die without 
heirs, you will fully investigate the matter and state what may appear really 
just, when . His Higbness's government, with the advice of the agent of 
the British Government, will send such orders as may be fit and proper, which 
must be conformed to. 

Article 3. 

That the inhabitants of your country may be protected, justice must 
be honestly administered, and a proper police established for the prevention 
and detection of thieves and robbers ; but if unjust decisions are given, and 
no good police kept up, so that thefts and robberies become of frequent occur- 
rence, and people in consequence may be obliged to bring forward com- 
plaints ; in the event of such being the case, whatever orders may in con- 
sequence be issued by His Highness's government, with the advice of the 
Agent of the British Government, these must be carried into effect. 

Article i. 

Without the knowledge and orders of government no extra troops are 
to be levied or war entered upon with any one. In all cases of domestic 
disputes about relationship and such like, no appeal to arms will be permitted, 
but information is to be sent to government, when such orders as may be 
sent on the subject, with the advice of the Agent of the British Govern- 
ment, must be considered binding. 

Article 5. 

Excepting those under the government of His Highness, no intercourse 
or communication by letter can be allowed with any Chief, such as Bajee 
Eao Sahib or other Princes, Chieftains, Commanders, arid others, nor is it 
permitted to send aid to any one, or to become concerned in the assemblage 
of any troops whatever. This Article forms the basis of the present agree- 
ment, and if it is departed from, with the advice of the British Government, 
your possessions shall not be continued. 

Article 6. 
All offenders and criminals from your country who may take shelter 
in the territory of His Highness shall be delivered over to you, and in 
like manner all offenders and criminals from within the territories of His^ 
Highness, or of the- British Government, who may enter your country, shall 
be given up and delivered to whichever government they belong. Assistance 
must be rendered to people of both governments who may enter into your 
country in pursuit of such offenders. 

Article 7. 
Whilst you remain and perform the conditions of your service in good 
faith, integrity, and fidelity, your possessions shall be continued without inter- 



364 Satara Jaghiredars— The Diiflay— No. CXXXV. 



ruption on the part of His Higliness' govemment, and on this point the 
British Government is your guarantee, \iihich His Highness's government 
approves of and agrees to. 

Article 8. 

All titles and forms of respect hitherto enjoyed by you shall be con- 
tinued, and all requests forwarded by you shall be attended to, and, if reason- 
able and proper, they will be granted, but if otherwise, rejected. 

Article 9. 

As your country adjoins the territory of His Highness, and it may be 
necessary in consequence to effect exchanges either for the purpose, of defin- 
ing boundaries for police arrangements, or for settling revenue matters, 
thei'efore such exchanges shall be made with the advice of the Agent of the 
British Government, provided they are not injurious to your interests. 

Article 10. 

You must appear in personal attendance yearly at the festival of the 
Dusserahj as well as on all occasions of ceremony and congratulation when 
His Highness may require you to be present in person. Whenever the 
establishment of Plis Highness may move to any great distance, you must 
on such occasions be present and accompany His Highness. 

Article 11. 

The Punt Sucheo received from you a yearly payment of Rupees two 
thousand (2,000), which is now agreed to be transferred to His Highness on 
account of the elephant establishment, and you must accordingly pay this sum 
annually to His Highness' government. 



No. CXXXV. 

Ageeement between the Bbitish Goveenmbnt and tlie Dufiatkue, dated 22nd 

Apiil 1820. 



Seal 
of Captain 
J. Qraut. 



Teems fixed by Captain James Geant Sahib Bahadooe on the part of the Honoueabie 
Company Bahadooe for 'TIsMtri Puna Kenooka Bai Duflat Deshmook of Jut 
and KuEZGEE, by which the Jut and Kuezgee Pergunaihs are made over to her. 

These districts were formerly held as a personal and military jaghire, and 
having come into the possession of the British Government along with the 



Satara Jaghiredars— The Duflay— No. CXXXV, 365 



rest of the country, they are now freely restored in consideration of the anti- 
quity and respectability of the family, to be held as formerly in personal 
and military jaghire. But as these districts came within the limits of the 
territory of His Highness the Rajah of Satara, according to the Treaty with 
the British Government, therefore Kenooka Bai Duflay is to be considered a 
jaghiredar of His Highness's government, but under the guarantee of the 
British Government. 

The following Articles are agreed to on the part of the British Govern- 
ment and Renooka Bai Duflay :— 

Aeticle 1. 
The districts of Jut and Kurzgee having been possessed as a jaghire up 
to the period of register, they are now freely restored and confirmed. During 
the government of the Peishwa these districts were held as an allowance for 
four hundred and fifty (450) horse under Rasteea, but afterwards the number 
was fixed at three hundred (300), and because the country was not in a 
flourishing state, full service to that amount was not demanded, and the 
number finally fixed at two hundred. That Renooka Bai Duflay may live in 
afiluence and comfort, and also be enabled to keep up the contingent in the 
most complete state of equipment. Government have remitted three-fourths 
of that number, and fixed the present contingent at fifty (50) horse, which 
must be kept up constantly in the service of His Highness the Rajah of 
Satara. 

Article 2. 

The horses and men forming the contingent are to be good. The horses 
of the value of from Rupees 300 to 400 to be always present in the service 
of His Highness, and to proceed without delay or remonstrance wherever their 
services may be required. They are to be mustered whenever so ordered, and 
should there be any deficiency in the number, such deficiency must be made 
good at the- annual rate of Rupees 300 per each horse, to be calculated from 
the period of the former muster, but previous to enforcing the demand, a 
representation of the circumstances will be made by His Highness's govern- 
ment to the Agent of the British Government, and his concurrence obtained. 

Article 3. 
In the event of the contingent being employed in war under a requi- 
sition from the British Government, and should any men or horses in 
consequence be killed or wounded, it is to be clearly understood that nothmg 
in the way of an equivalent shall be paid by the government of His Highness. 
Risks and casualties of all kinds, as well as the furnishing of ammunition, 
are included in the allowance. 

Article 4. 
The whole expense of managing the jaghire is to be defrayed without 
reference to what is incurred by keeping up the horse. As the territories 
of the British Government and of His Highness adjoin the jaghire, it is 



366 Satara Jaghiredars— The Duflay— No. CXXXV. 



therefoi'e determined that in the event of any disturhance taking place in 
them, on the requisition of the mamlutdar of either government, aid shall 
be furnished by a ready co-operation with all the disposable police of the 
jaghire. 

Aeticle 5, 

Whatever inam villages, wuttuns, and other allowances have hitherto 
belonged to Renooka Bai Duflay within the territories of the British Govern- 
ment or of His Highness shall be continued, and whatever items of revenue 
belonging to His Highness' government may be within the jaghire district 
shall continue to, be paid ; all doomalla villages and land, wurshasun, dhurmadao 
dewasthan, rozindar, khyrat, nemnook, durruk, and such like allowances within 
the jaghire must be continued as they are at present. All persons having pos- 
sessions on government deeds are not to be interfered with : such interruptions 
as might exist from temporary causes at the time charge was received from 
the British Government are to be examined and the claims justly settled. 

Care must be taken that no just cause of complaint may be brought 
forward on such points. In cases where any of the abovementioned posses- 
sors of inheritance or allowance shall behave improperly, it will be necessary 
to acquaint the Agent of the British Government with the particulars, who, 
in conjunction with His Highness' government, will intimate what course 
is to be pursued either in respect to punishment or resumption. Should 
persons holding such inheritances or allowances raise or excite any distur- 
bances, or commit any offences against the peace of the public, or should 
persons possessed of such rights die without heirs, you will fully investigate 
the mattet and state what appears really just, when His Highness' govern- 
ment, with the advice of the Agent of the British Government, will send 
such orders as may seem fit, and which must be conformed to. 

Aeticle 6. 

That the inhabitants of the jaghire territory may be protected, justice 
must be properly dispensed, and a good police upheld to detect theft and to 
suppress gang robberies. If this is not attended to, and the country be 
without justice, so that people are obliged to complain, the government of 
His Highness, with the advice and assistance of the Agent of the British 
Government, having understood the matter, will decide on such subjects, 
and their decisions must be attended to. And further, in regard to such 
decisions not being attended to, so that the country may fall into a state of 
misgovern men t, and robberies and other crimes become of very frequent 
occurrence, in such an event, whatever may appear to be the most proper 
measures shall be suggested by the Agent of the British Government, and 
corresponding arrangements will be made by His Highness's government. 

Aeticle 7. 
Without orders from government no extra troops are to be levied, and 
none assembled for the purpose of making war on any one. In matters of 
family disputes concerning relationship and such like, no appeal to arms can 



Satara Jaghiredars— The Duflay— No. CXXXV. 367 



be permitted, but the case is to be represented to the Agent of tbe British 
Government, who will commanicate with the government of His Highness, 
and whatever decision is given must be reckoned binding. 

Aeticle 8. 
With the exception of those under the government of His Highness, 
no intercourse or communication by letter is to be entered into with such as 
Bajee Rao Sahib, or other Princes, Chieftains, Commanders, .and others, nor 
is any aid or assistance, by joining the troops of any one, to be given. This 
article forms the basis of the present agreement, and should what is above 
written be departed from, the jaghire will not be continued. 

Article 9. 

All persons having committed crimes within the jaghire country, who 
may take shelter in the territories of the British Government or of His 
Highness, shall be delivered over to Renooka Bai Duflay after information 
has been given to the Agent of the British Government, and by him com- 
municated to the British Government or to the government of His Highness, 
as the case may be ; and in like manner all criminals from the territories of 
the British Government or of His Highness shall be delivered up by Renooka 
Bai Duflay to their respective governments, and assistance must be rendered 
to people of either government who may be sent lor the apprehension of such 
offenders. 

Article 10. 

Whilst you Renooka Bai Duflay shall continue to fulfil the terms of your 
service in good faith, integrity, and fidelity, your jaghire shall be held without 
any interruption from His Highness's government J on this point the British 
is your guarantee. 

Article 11. 

All titles and forms of respect hitherto enjoyed by Renooka Bai Duflay 
shall be continued. All requests on the part of the jaghiredar, which may be 
reasonable and proper, shall be granted, but such as are otherwise shall not be 
agreed to. 

Article 12. 

As the jaghire district adjoins the territory of His Highness, and it may 
be necessary to efEect exchanges of items of revenue or land for the purpose 
either of defining the boundary or for police arrangements, therefore, on a 
representation from the government of His Highness, the Agent of the 
British Government will arrange such exchanges as may be necessary, provided 
they are not injurious to the interests of the jaghiredar, and such exchanges 
must be made accordingly. 

In all twelve Articles, as above, which must be observed. 

Bated llnd April A.D. 1820, corresponding with ^th Bujjub Sunnut 
Ushreen-wu-M^aiein-wu-Ulf, or Arabic year 1220, at Satara. 



Signature of 

Captain 

J. Grant. 



368 Satara Jaghiredars— The Duflay— Wo. CXXXV. 



Agebement between the Rajah of Sataea and the Duflaykue, July 1820. 



Seal of 

His Highness 

the Kajah 

of Satara. 



Ageeement on the part of His Highness the Rajah of Sataea respecting Rbnooea 
Bai Ddelat, Dbshmook of the Peegunnahs of Jut and Kuezgbb, to whom these 
commands are issued. 

The pergunnalis of Jut and Kurzgee, having heen for a long time past 
possessed by you in jaghire^ therefore the British GoYernment have in tlieir 
liberality freely restored and bestowed the same on you according to terms fixed 
by Captain James Grant Bahadoor on their part consisting of 12 Articles. 

The country of the jaghire having come within the limits of the territory 
of His Highness by the Treaty with the British Government^ an agreement 
in consequence has been made out and delivered to you on the part of the 
British Government, which has been approved of by the Hoozoor, and for the 
purpose of confirming you in the abovementioned jaghire the Circar has 
determined as follows : — 

AUTICLE 1. 

The pergunnahs of Jut and Kurzgee are to be held as a* personal and 
military jaghire on condition of furnishing fifty (50) horse, completely equip- 
ped, to be kept constantly present in the service of His Highness the Rajah 
of Satara. 

Aeticle 2. 

The horses and men forming the contingent are to be good ; the horses 
of the value of from Rupees 3 to 400 to be kept constantly ready in the 
service of His Highness, to be mustered whenever so ordered, and to proceed 
wherever their services may be required without delay or remonstrance. 
Should any deficiency in the number appear at muster, such deficiency must 
be made good at the annual rate of Rupees 300 per each horse, to be calculated 
from the period at which the former muster took place ; but previous to en- 
forcing this demand His Highness' government will make a representation of 
the circumstances and obtain the concurrence of the Agent of the British 
Government. 

Article 3. 
In the event of your contingent being employed in war on requisition 
by the Agent of the British Government, and should any men or horses in 
consequence be either killed or wounded, it is to be clearly understood that 
nothing in the way of compensation shall be paid by the government of His 
Highness. Risks and casualties of all kinds, as well as the furnishing of 
ammunition, are included in the allowance. 



Satara Jaghiredars— The Duflay— No. CXXXV. 389 



Article 4. 

The whole expense of managing the jaghire is to be defrayed without any 
reference to what is incurred by keeping up the horse. The territories of the 
British Government and of His Highness being situated close to the jaghire 
country, in the event of any disturbance taking place, on the requisition of 
the mamlutdars of either government, aid must be furnished by a ready co- 
operation with all the disposable police of the jaghire, 

Akticle 5. 

Whatever wuttun or other allowances have hitherto been enjoyed by you 
within the territory of His Highness shall be continued, and all items of 
revenue belonging to His Highness within your districts shall continue to be 
paid. Within the jaghire country all doomalla villages and land, wurshasun, 
dhurmadao, dewasthan, rozindar, khyrat, nemnook, daruk, and such like allow- 
ances must be continued as they at present stand. All persons having posses- 
sions on government grants are not to be interfered with ; such interruptions 
as might exist from temporary causes at the time you received charge (from 
the British Government) are to be examined, and the claims justly settled. 
You will be careful that no just cause of complaint is brought forward against 
you on such points. 

In cases where any of the abovementioned possessors of inheritance or 
allowance shall behave improperly, it will be necessary to acquaint the Agent 
of the British Government with the particulars, who, in conjunction with 
His Highness' government, will intimate what course ts to be pursued either 
in respect to punishment or resumption. Should persons holding such inherit- 
ances or allowances' raise or excite any disturbance, or commit any offences 
against the peace of the public, or should such persons die without heirs, you 
will fully investigate the matter, and state what may appear really just, when 
His Highness's government, with the advice of the Agent of the British 
Government, will send such orders as may seem fit, and which must be con- 
formed to. 

Article 6. 

That the inhabitants of the jaghire country may be protected, justice 
must be properly administered, aRd a good police upheld to detect theft 
and to suppress gang robberies. If this is not attended to, and unjust deci- 
sions given, so that people are obliged to complain, the government of His 
Highness, with the advice and assistance of the Agent of the British Govern- 
ment, having understood the matter, will decide on such subjects, and their 
decisions must be attended to. And further in reg'ard to such decisions not 
being attended to, so that the country may become in a state of misgovern- 
ment, and robberies and other crimes of very frequent occurrence, then what- 
ever appears to be the proper measures shall be suggested by the Agent of 
the British Government, and corresponding arrangements will be made by 
His Highness's government. 

Article 7. 

Without orders from government no extra troops are to be levied, and 
none assembled for the purpose of making war on any one. In matters of 

47 



370 Satara Jaghiredars— The Duflay— Wo. CXXXV. 



family disputes concering relationship and such like, no appeal to arms 
can be permitted ; but the matter is to be represented to government, when 
such orders as may be given, with the advice of the Agent of the British 
Government, must be reckoned binding. 

Aeticle 8. 
With the exception of those under the government of His Highness, no 
intercourse or communication by letter is to be entered into with any Chiefs, 
such as BaJ9e Rao Sahib, or other Princes, Chieftains, Commanders, and 
others, nor is any aid or assistance by joining the troops of any one to he 
given. This Article forms the basis of the present agreement, and should 
what is above written be departed from, with the advice of the Agent of the 
British Government, the jaghire will not be continued. 

Article 9. 

All persons having committed crimes within the jaghire country, and 
who may take shelter in the territory of His Highness, shall be delivered over 
to you; all criminals from within the territories of His Highness or of the 
British Government shall be delivered up to their respective governments, and 
every assistance must be rendered to people of either government who may 
enter your country in pursuit of such offenders. 

Aeticle 10. 

Whilst you continue to perform the terms of your service in good faith, 
integrity, and fidelity, your jaghire shall be held without any interruption on 
the part of the Circar; on this point the British Government is your guaran- 
tee, which His Highness's government agrees to. 

Article 11. 

All titles and all customary forms of respect hitherto enjoyed by you 
shall be continued. All requests on your part which may be reasonable aad 
proper shall be granted, but such as are otherwise shall not be agreed to. 

Article 12. 

As your jaghire adjoins the territory of His Highness, and consequently 
it njay be necessary to effect exchanges of land or items of revenue, either for 
the purpose of distinctly defining the boundary, or for police arrangements, 
therefore such exchanges shall take place with the advice and assistance of the 
Agent of the British Government, provided they are not injurious to your 
interests. 

Article 13. 

You must appear in personal attendance yearly at the festival of the 
Dusserah, and also attend on all occasions of ceremony or congratulation 
when your attendance may be required by His Highness. You must also be 
in personal attendance whenever the establishment of His Highness may 
move to any great distance. 



Satara JagMredars-The Nimbalkur-No. CXXXVI. 371 

No. CXXXVI. 

Agbeement between the Honotjhablb East India Company and the De&hmook of 
Phultun, commonly called the Nimbalkite, dated the 22nd April 1820. 



Seal of 
Captain 
J. Grant. 



Teems fixed By Captain James Geant Sahib Bahadooe on the part of the HoNOUEABtir 
Company for Eag Sahib Meheeban Jan Eao Naik Nimbalkuk, Deshmook of 
Phultttn, by which the Peegunnah of Phultun is made over to him, as he enjoyed 
the same formerly in personal and military jaghire. 

This district, along with the rest of the country, having come into the 
possession of the British Government, it is now freely bestowed as a military 
jaghire in consideration of the antiquity and respectability of the family ; 
but as, according to the terms of the Treaty concluded with His Highness 
the Rajah of Satara, this jaghire is within the limits of his territory, there- 
fore Jan Rao Naik Nimbalkur is to be considered a jaghiredar of His High- 
nesses government, but under the guarantee of the British Government. 

The following Articles are agreed to on the part of the British Govern- 
ment and Jan Rao Naik : — 

Article 1. 

The Phultan pergunnah having been possessed up to the war as a 
personal and military allowance, in like manner it is now restored and con- 
firmed. During the government of the Peishwa, the contingent was fixed at 
three hundred and fifty (350) horse, but in consequence of the country not 
being in a flourishing state, service to the full amount of this number was not 
insisted upon. 

That Jan Rao Naik may live in afiluence and comfort, and also be 
enabled to keep up his contingent in the most complete state of equipment 
and readiness for the service, Government have fixed the amount of it at 
ninety (90) horse, of which number seventy-five (75) must always remain 
in the service of His Highness the Rajah of Satara, and the remaining fifteen 
(15) with the Naik. 

Article 2. 

The horses and men forming the Contingent are to be good, the horses of 
the value of from Rupees 300 to 400, and to be always kept ready in the 
service of His Highness's government. Wherever their services may be 
required, they are to proceed without any delay or remonstrance. They are to 
be mustered whenever so ordered, and should there be any of the number 
deficient, such deficiency must be made good at the annual rate of Rupees 
300 for each horse, calculated from the period at which the formfer muster took 
place- but previous to enforcing the demand. His Highness's government 



372 Satara Jaghiredars— The Nimtaalkur— Wo. CXXXVI. 

will make a representation of the circumstances and obtain the concurrence 
of the Agent of the British Government. 

Article 3. 

In the event of the contingent being employed in war, under a requisi- 
tion from the British Government, should any horses or men in consequence 
be killed or wounded, it is to be clearly understood that nothing in the way 
of an equivalent shall be paid by His Highness's government. Risks and 
casualties of all kinds, including the furnishing of ammunition, are included 
in the allowance. 

AUTICLE 4. 

The whole expense of managing the jaghire is to be defrayed without 
any reference to what is incurred by keeping up the horse. The territories 
of the British Government and of His Highness being situated close to the 
jaghire, in the event of any disturbance taking place, on the requisition of 
the mamlutdars of either of the Governments, aid must be furnished by a 
ready co-operation with all the disposable police of the jaghire. 

Article 5. 

Whatever inam villages, wuttuns, &c., have hitherto belonged to the 
Naik shall be continued to him in the territory of His Highness, and all items 
of revenue of His Highness, which lie within the district of the Naik, shall 
be paid to His Highness's government. Within the jaghire territory all 
doomalla villages, wurshasun, dhurmadao, dewasthan, rozindar, khyrat, nem- 
nook, daruk, and such like payments, must be continued as they are at this 
time. All persons having possessions on government grants are not to be 
interfered with; such interruptions as might exist from temporary causes 
at the time you received charge (from the British Government) are to be 
examined, and the claims justly settled. You will be careful that no just 
cause of complaint is brought forward against you on such points. 

In cases where any of the above mentioned possessors of inheritance or 
allowances shall behave improperly, it will be necessary to acquaint the Agent 
of the British Government with the particulars, who, in conjunction with 
His Highness's government, will intimate what course is to be pursued, either 
in respect to punishment or resumption. Should persons holding such inheri- 
tance or allowance raise or excite any disturbance, or commit any ofEences 
against the peace of the public, or should persons possessed of such rights 
die without heirs, you will fully investigate the matter, and state what may 
appear really just, when His Highness's government, with the advice of the 
Agent of the British Government, will send such orders as may seem fit, and 
which must be conformed to. 

Article 6. 

That the subjects of the jaghire territory may have protection, justice 
must be properly administered, and a good police upheld to detect thefts and 
to suppress gang robberies. If this is not attended to, and the country be 



Satara Jaghiredars— The Nimbalkur— No. CXXXVI. 373 



without justice, so that people are obliged to complaiiij. the government of His 
Highness, with the advice and assistance of the Agent of the British Govern- 
ment, having understood the matter, will decide on such subjects, and their deci- 
sions must be attended to ; and further, in regard to such decisions not being 
attended to, so that the "country may become in a state of misgovernment, and 
robberies and other crimes of very frequent occurrence, then whatever appears 
to be proper measures shall be suggested by the Agent of the British Gov- 
ernment, and corresponding arrangements will be made by His Highness's 
government. 

Article 7. 

Without orders from government no extra troops are to be levied, and 
none assembled for the purpose of making war on any one. In matters of 
family dispxites concerning relationship and such like, no appeal to arms can 
be permitted, but the case is to be represented to the Agent of the British 
Government, who will communicate with the government of His Highness, 
and whatever decision is given must be reckoned binding. 

Article 8. 

With the exception of those under the government of His Highness, no 
intercourse or correspondence by letter is to be entered into with such as Bajee 
Rao Sahib, or other Princes, Chieftains, Commanders, and others, nor is any 
aid or assistance by joining the troops of any one to be given. This Article 
forms the basis of the present' agreement^! and should what is above written be 
departed from, the jaghire will not be continued. 

Article 9. 

All persons having committed crimes within the jaghire territory, and 
who may take shelter in the dominions of the British Government or of His 
Highness, shall be delivered over to Jan Rao Naik Nimbalkur, after informa- 
tion has been given to the Agent of the British Government, and by him 
communicated to the British Government, or to the government of His High- 
ness, as the case may be ; and in like manner, all criminals from the territories 
of the British Government or of His Highness shall be delivered up by Jan 
Rao Naik to their respective governments, and assistance must also be rendered 
to any public servants who may be sent for the apprehension of such persons. 

- ^ Article 10. 

Whilst Jan Rao Naik shall continue to fulfil the terms of his service in 
good faith, ijitegrity, and fidelity, the jaghire shall be held without any inter- 
ruption from His Highness's government ; on this point the British Govern- 
ment is the guarantee. 

Article 11. 

All titles and customary forms of respect hitherto enjoyed by Jan Rao 
Naik shall be continued. All requests on the part of the jaghiredar, which 
may be reasonable and proper, shall be granted, but such as are otherwise shall 
not be agreed to. 



374 Satara Jaghiredars— The Nimbalkur— Wo. CXXXVI. 



Akticle 12. 

As the jaghire district adjoins the territory of His Highness, and con- 
sequently it may be necessary to effect exchanges of items of revenue or laad, 
either for the purpose of distinctly defining the boundary, or on account of 
arrangements in the police, therefore, on a representation from the govern- 
ment of His Highness, the Agent of the British Government will arrange 
such exchanges as may be necessary, having previously ascertained that they 
will not be injurious to the interests of Jan Rao Naik, and such exchanges 
must be made accordingly. 

In all, 12 Articles, as above, which must be observed. 

Bated at Satara, the 2'^nd April 1820, (or 'ith Bujjub Sunnut Ushreen-ww- 
Mi/atein-wu-Ulf, or Arabic year 1220.^ 

(Sd.) James Guant. 



Ageeement entered into in July 1820 by His Highness the Eajah of Sataea with the 

NlMBALKUE. 



Large Seal of 

His Highness 

the Rajah of 

Satara. 



Ageeement on the part of His Highness the Rajah of Sataea respecting Rajesheee 
Jan Eao Naik Nimbalkue, Deshmook of the Phtjltun Pbegunnah, to whom 
these commands are issued. 

The pergunnah of Phultun having been for a long time past possessed 
by you as a personal and military jaghire, the British Government, therefore, 
have in their liberality freely bestowed and restored the same to you according 
to terms fixed by Captain James Grant Bahadoor on their part. The coun- 
try of the jaghire having come within the limits of the territory of the 
Hoozoor, by the Treaty with the British Government, it has accordingly 
been placed under it, and an agreement on the part of the British Govern- 
ment has been made and delivered to you, which has been approved of by 
the Circar ; and, for the purpose of confirming you in the above mentioned 
jaghire, the Hoozoor has determined as follows : — 

Article 1. 
The pergunnah of Phultun is to be held as a personal and military 
jaghire, on condition of furnishing ninety (90) horse, seventy-five (75) of 
which, completely equipped, and the horses good, are always to be kept in 
the service of the Hoozoor, and the remaining fifteen (15) to remain with 
you. 



Satara Jaghiredars— The Nimtaalkur— No. CXXXVI. 375 



Article 2. 

The horses and men forming the contingent are to be goodj the horses 
at the value of from Eupees 300 to 400, and to be always kept ready in the 
service of His Highnesses government. Wherever their services may be 
required, they are to proceed without any delay or remonstrance. They are 
to be mustered whenever so ordered, and should there be any of the 
number deficient, such deficiency must be made good at the annual rate of 
Rupees 300 for each horse, calculated from the period at which the former 
muster took place ; but previous to enforcing the demand. His Highness's 
government will make a representation of the circumstances and obtain 
the concurrence of the Agent of the British Government. 

Article 3. 

In the event of the contingent being employed in war, under a requisi- 
tion from the British Government, should any horses or men in consequence 
be killed or wounded, it is to be clearly understood that nothing in the way 
of an equivalent shall be paid by His Highness's government. Risks and 
casualties of all kinds, including the furnishing of ammunition, are included 
in the allowance. • 

Article 4. 

The whole expense of managing the jaghire is to be defrayed without 
any reference to what is incurred by keeping up the horse. The territories 
of the British Government and of His Highness being situated close to the 
jaghire, in the event of any disturbance taking place, on the requisition of 
the mamlutdars of either of the governments, aid must be furnished by a 
ready co-operation with all the disposable police of the jaghire. 

Article 5. 

Whatever inam villages, wuttuns, &c., have hitherto belonged to the Naik 
shall be continued to him in the territory of His Highness; and all items of 
revenue of His Highness which lie within the district of the Naik, shall be paid 
to His Highness' government. Within the jaghire territory all doomalla 
villages, wurshasun, dhurmadao, dewasthan, rozindar, khyrat, nemnook, daruk, 
and such like payments, must be continued as they are at this time. All persons 
having possessions on government grants are not to be interfered with ; such 
interruptions as might exist from temporary causes at the time you received 
charge (from the. British Government) are to be examined, and the claims 
justly settled. You will be careful that no just cause of complaint is brought 
forward against you on such points. 

In cases where any of the above mentioned possessors of inheritance or 
allowance shall behave improperly, it will be necessary to acquaint the Agent 
of the British Government with the particulars, who, in conjunction with 
His Highness's government, will incimate what course is to be pursued, either 
in respect to punishment or resumption. Should persons holding such inheri- 
tances or allowances raise or excite any disturbance, or commit any offences 
against the peace of the public, or should persons possessed of such rights die 



376 Satara Jaghiredars— The Nimbalkur— No. CXXXVI. 



without heirs, you will fully investigate the matter, and state what may appear 
really just, when His Highnesses government, with the advice of the Agent of 
the British Government, will send such orders as may seem fit, and which 
must be conformed to. 

Article 6. 

That the subjects of the jaghire territory may have protection, justice 
must be properly administered, and a good police upheld to detect theft and 
to suppress gang robberies. If this is not attended to, and the country be 
without justice, so that people are obliged to complain, the government of His 
Highness, with the advice and assistance of the Agent of the British Govern- 
ment, having understood the matter, will decide on such subjects, and their 
decisions must be attended to. And further, in regard to such decisions not 
being attended to, so that the country may become in a state of misgovern- 
ment, and robberies and other crimes of very frequent occurrence, then what- 
ever appears to be the proper measures shall be suggested by the Agent of the 
British Government, and corresponding arrangements will be made by His 
Highnesses government. 

Aeticle 7. 

Without orders from government no extra troops are to be levied, and 
none assembled for the purpose of making war on any one. In matters 
of family disputes concerning relationship and such like, no appeal to arms 
can be premitted, but the case is to be represented to the Agent of the 
British Government, who will communicate with the government of His 
Highness, and whatever decision is given must be reckoned binding. 

Aeticle 8. 

With the exception of those under the government of His Highness, no 
intercourse or correspondence by letter is to be entered into with such as Bajee 
Rao Sahib, or other Princes, Chieftains, Commanders, and others, nor is any 
aid or assistance by joining the troops of any one to be given. This Article 
forms the basis of the present agreement, and if what is above written be 
departed from, by the advice of the British Government, the jaghire will not 
be continued. 

Aeticle 9. 

All persons having committed crimes within the jaghire territory, and 
who may take shelter in the country of the Hoozoor, shall be delivered over 
to you, after information has been given to the Agent of the British Govern- 
ment, and by him communicated to the British Government, or to the govern- 
ment of His Highness, as the case may be ; and in like manner all criminals 
from the territories of the British Government, or of His Highness, shall be 
delivered up by Jan Rao Naik to their respective governments, and assistance 
must also be rendered to any public servants who may be sent for the 
apprehension of such persons. 

Aeticle 10. 
Whilst you shall continue to fulfil the terms of your service in good 
faith, integrity, and fidelity, the jaghire shall be held without any inter- 



Satara Jaghiredars— The Waekur— No. CXXXVII. 



377 



ruption on the part of the Cirear; on this point the British Government is 
your guarantee, which is agreed to by the Cirear. 

Article 11. 

All titles and all customary forms of respect hitherto enjoyed by you 
shall be continued. All requests on your part which may be reasonable and 
proper shall be granted, but such as are otherwise shall not be agreed to. 

Article 12. 

As the jaghire district adjoins the territory of His Highness, and conse- 
quently it may be necessary to effect exchanges of items of revenue or land, 
either for the purpose of distinctly defining the boundary, or on account of 
arrangements in the police, therefore, on a representation from the government 
of His Highness, the Agent of the British Government will arrange such 
exchanges as may be necessary, having previously ascertained that they will 
not be injurious to your interests, and such exchanges must be made 
accordingly. 

Article 13. 
You must appear in person every year at the festival of the Dusserah, 
and also attend, whenever requested so to do, on all great occasions of cere- 
mony and congratulation ; and when His Highness with his establishment 
may proceed to any great distance, you must also be in personal attendance. 



Small Seal 
of His High- 
ness the Ra- 
jah of Satara 



Bated July 1820. 



No. CXXXVII. 
Ageeemeni concluded with Sheikh Miea Waekue, dated the 3id July 1820. 



Seal of Cap 
tain J. Grant. 



Teems fixed by Captain James Geant, on the part of the Honoueable Company, for 

Sheikh Miea Waekue, by which the jaghires, &o<, (with the exception of Peegunnah 

DtTETAPOEE, Pbant Wuead, Mouza Bholbb, Pebgunnnh Shiealee, Mouza 

PuLSBE Peant Waee) are made over to him. 

These iaghires, &c-, were formerly held by you as a personal and military 

jaghire; but having come into the possession of the British Government 

IV ^^ 



378 Satara Jaghiredars— The Waekur— No. CXXXVII. 



along with the rest of the countiy, they are now restored, in consideration of 
the antiquity and respectability of the family, to be held, as formerly, in 
personal and military jaghires. But as these jaghires, &c., came within the 
limits of the territory ot His Highness the Rajah of Satara, according to the 
Treaty with the British Government, therefore Sheikh Mira Waekur is to be 
considered a jaghiredar of His Highness's government, but under the 
guarantee of the British Government. The following Articles are agreed to 
on the part of the British Government and Sheikh Mira Waekur :— 

Aeticle 1,, 

The pergunnah of Yerndole, Prant Khandesh, and the pergunnahs in 
" Swudesh" (Peishwa's territory), were granted after fixing the " khundnee" 
(tribute). Formerly you had to furnish 63 horse to the Peishwa's govern- 
ment; but as pergunnah Duryapore, &e., were attached, and as the country 
was not in a flourishing state, full service to that amount was not demanded. 
That Sheikh Mira Waekur may live in comfort and affluence, and also be 
enabled to keep up the contingent in the most complete state of equipment, 
government have fixed the present contingent at ten (10) horse, which must 
be kept up constantly in the service of His Highness the Rajah of Satara. 

Aeticle 2. 

The horses and men forming the contingent are to be good, the horses of 
the value of from Rupees 300 to 400, to be always present in the service of 
His Highness, and to proceed, without delay or remonstrance, wherever their 
services may be required. They are to be mustered whenever so ordered, and 
should there be any deficiency in the number, such deficiency must be made 
good at the annual rate of Rupees 300 each horse, to be calculated from the 
period of the former muster ; but previous to enforcing the demand, a repre- 
sentation of the circumstances will be made by His Highness's government 
to the Agent of the British Government, and his concurrence obtained. 

Article 3. 

In the event of the contingent being employed in war under a requi- 
sition from the British Government, and should any men or horses in 
consequence be killed or wounded, it is to be clearly understood that nothing 
in the way of equivalent shall be paid by the government of His Highness. 
Risks and casualties of all kinds, as well as the furnishing of ammunition, 
are included in the allowance. 

Article 4. 

The whole expense of managing the jaghire is to be defrayed without 
reference to what is incurred by keeping up the horse. As the territories of 
the British Government and of His Highness adjoin the jaghire, it is there- 
fore determined that in the event of any disturbance taking place in them, on 
the requisition of the mamlutdars of either government, aid shall be furnished 
by a ready co-operation with all the disposable police of the jaghire. 



Satara Jaghiredars-The Waekur-No. CXXXVII. 379 



AUTICLB 5. 

Whatever inam villages, wuttuns, and other allowances have hitherto 
belonged to Sheikh Mira Waekur within the territories of the British Gov- 
ernment or of His Highness shall be continued; and whatever items of 
revenue belonging to His Highness's government may be within the jaghire 
shall be continued to be paid. All doomalla villages and land, wurshasun, 
dhurmadao, dewasthan, rozindar, khyrat, nemnook, daruk. Sec, within the 
jaghire, must be continued as they are at present. All persons having posses- 
sions on government deeds are not to be interfered with ; such interruptions 
as might exist .from temporary causes at the time charge was received (from 
the British Government) are to be examined, and the claims justly settled : care 
must be taken that no just cause of complaint may be brought forward on 
such points. In cases when any of the abovementioned possessors of inheri- 
tance or allowance shall behave improperly, it will be necessary to acquaint 
the Agent of the British Government with the particulars, who, in conjunc- 
tion with His Highness's government, will intimate what course is to be 
pursued either in respect to punishment or resumption. Should persons 
holding such inheritances or allowances raise or excite any disturbances, or 
commit any offences against the peace of the public, or should persons possessed 
of such rights die without heirs, you will fully investigate the matter and 
state what appears really just, when His Highness's government, with the 
advice of the Agent of the British Government, will send such orders as may 
seem fit, and which must be conformed to. 



Aeticle 6. 

That the inhabitants of the jaghire territory may be protected, justice 
must be properly dispensed, and a good police upheld to detect theft and 
suppress gang robberies. If this is not attended to, and the country be with- 
out justice, so that people are obliged to complain, the government of His 
Highness, with the advice and assistance of the Agent of the British Govern- 
ment, having understood the matter, will decide on such subjects, and their 
decisions must be. attended to ; and further, in regard to such decisions not 
being attended to, so that the country may fall into a state of misgovernment, 
and robberies and other crimes become of very frequent occurrence, in such 
an event, whatever may appear to be the most proper measures shall be sug- 
gested by the Agent of the British Governrnent, and corresponding arrange- 
ments will be made by His Highness's government. 



Article 7. 
Without orders from government no extra troops are to be levied, and 
none assembled for the purpose of making war on any one. In matters of 
family disputes concerning relationship and such like, no appeal to arms can 
be permitted, but the case is to be represented to the Agent of the British 
Government, who will communicate with the government of His Highness, 
and whatever decision is given must be reckoned binding. 



380 Satara Jaghiredars— The Waekur— Wo. CXXXVII. 



AUTICLB 8. 

With the exception of those under the government of His Highness, no 
intercourse or communication by letter is to be entered into with such as 
Bajee Rao Sahib, or other Princes, Chieftains, Commanders, and others, nor 
is any aid or assistance by joining the troops of any one to be given. This 
Article forms the basis of the present agreement, and should what is written 
above be departed from, the jaghire will not be continued. 

Article 9. 

All persons having committed crimes within the jaghire country, who 
may take shelter in the territories of the British Government or of His 
Highness, shall be delivered over to Sheikh Mira Waekur, after information 
has been given to the Agent of the British Government, and by him com- 
municated to the British Government, or to the government of His High- 
ness, as the case may be ; and in like manner all criminals from the territories 
of the British Government or of His Highness shall be delivered up by 
Sheikh Mira Waekiir to their respective governments, and assistance must be 
rendered to people of either government who may be sent for the apprehen- 
sion of such offenders. 

Article 10. 

"Whilst you. Sheikh Mira Waekur, shall continue to fulfil the terms of 
your service in good faith, integrity, and fidelity, your jaghire shall be held 
without any interruption from His Highness's government; on this point 
the British Government is your guarantee. 

Article 11. 
All titles and forms of respect hitherto enjoyed by you shall be conti- 
nued. All requests on the part of the jaghiredar which may be reasonable 
and proper shall be granted, but such as are otherwise shall not be agreed to. 

Article 13. 
As the jaghire districts adjoin the territory of His Highness, and it may 
be necessary to effect exchanges of items of revenue or land for the purpose 
either of defining the boundary or for police arrangements, therefore, on a 
representation from the government of His Highness, the Agent of the 
British Government will arrange such exchanges as may be necessary, pro- 
vided they are not injurious to the ' interests of the jaghiredars, and such 
exchanges must be made accordingly. 

The above 12, Articles must be observed. 

Dated the 3rd July 1820, correspondinff with tlie 21st Ramzan, AMee- 
wii- Vshreen-wu-Myatein-wu- Vlf. 



(Sd.) James Grant. 



L. s. 



Satara Jaghiredars— The "Waekur -No. CXXXVII. 381 



Teanslation of a Yad executed by His Highness the Rajah of Sataea respecting 
SoojATUT Shaae Sheikh Miea Waekue, to whom these orders are issued. 

The whole of the jaghire, &,o., enjoyed hy yon have, with* the rest of the 
country, reverted to the British Government; but as that government has 
been pleased, in consideration of the antiquity of your family, to guarantee 
to you the villages held up to the war, excepting pergunnah Duryapore, Prant 
Wurad, mouza Bholee, pergunnah Shiralee, and mouza Pulsee, Prant Waee, 
by a Yad of 1 2 paragraphs executed to you by Captain James Grant, the 
British Kesident, whereof having been constituted a jaghiredar of this State 
during the pleasure of the British Government, you are to conduct yourself 
towards it like the other jaghiredars mentioned in the Treaty ; and as a Yad 
has been executed to you by the British Government, His Highness approves 
of the same, and for the continuation of the villages to you determines as 
follows, viz : — 

Article 1. 

The pergunnah of Yerndole, Prant Khandesh, and other possessions in 
the Deccan are hereby continued and confirmed to you. Formerly you had 
to maintain a contingent of 63 horse for the service of the Peishwa's govern- 
ment ; but as pergunnah Duryapore, &c., has now been resumed, and as you 
have sustained loss in the remaining umuls. His Highness, to enable you to 
support yourself and to keep the horse and men of your contingent in good 
order for service throughout the year, reduces the contingent to 10 horse, 
which you are always to maintain for the service of the Satara State. 

Article 3. 
The contingent is to be efficient, the horses to be of the value from 
Rupees 300 to 400, and the men in a complete state of equipment; the con- 
tingent to be always kept present for the service of His Highness ; they 
should attend muster when ordered, and proceed to whatever place directed 
without delay or remonstrance. Should it appear, however, on muster that 
any number of the contingent is deficient. His Highness will, with the con- 
eun-ence of the British Government, oblige you to refund in the proportion 
of Eupees 300 per annum a horse for the whole period of such deficiency, 
according to the terms of the agreement entered into with you. 

Article 3. 
In the event of your contingent being employed in war by His High- 
ness with the concurrence of the British Resident, no remuneration on ac- 
count of the wounded and slain will be granted ; but all such risks and 
casualties, as well as the supply of ammunition, are included in the grant. 

Article 4. 
You are to defray the expense of your civil establishment as well as of 
the contingent. Should any commotion or disturbance occur in the districts 
either of His Highness the Rajah or of the British Government, you are. 



382 Satara Jaghiredars— The Waekur— No. CXXXVII, 



on the requisition of the mamlutdars of either government; to aid and co- 
operate with them with the police in your districts. 

Aeticlb 5. 
The villages, umuls, and wuttuns, &c., in His Highness the RajaVs 
country held up to the war will be continued to you ; this government also 
retaining its umuls in your lands. All doomalla villages, doomalla inam 
lands, wurshasuns, dhurmadaos, dewasthans, rozindars, khyrats, and nem- 
nooks, &c., as well as the rights of darukdars, are to be continued to the 
several parties as heretofore without objection, together with the lands held 
by virtue of Sunnuds, although they may have been on certain grounds 
placed under attachment. Should any of the parties enumerated above act 
improperly, or die intestate, you are to report the same to this government 
when His Highness, with the concurrence of the British Government, will 
award punishment to the offender, or direct the resumption of the land, as 
may appear expedient. If any jemadar creates a riot, or raises rebellion in 
your country, or refuses to acknowledge your supremacy, or if a wuttundar 
dies intestate, you should attach the wuttun and report the matter to govern- 
ment, when His Highness, with the concurrence of the British Resident 
will issue such orders as may appear expedient, and to which you are to con- 
form accordingly. 

Aeticlb 6. 

You should endeavour to make your subjects happy, distribute justice 
impartially, and adopt measures for the prevention of theft, murder, and other 
crimes ; if these are not done, and if justice is not administered properly, 
and complaints are made to this government. His Highness, in conjunction 
with the British Resident, will enquire into the complaints, and issue such 
orders as may appear necessary, to which you are to conform ; but if you do 
not do so, and the country continue in a state of misgovernment, and crimes 
are of frequent occurrence. His Highness will, with the concurrence of the 
British Resident, adopt such preventive measures as may appear expedient to 
him. 

Akticle 7. 

You should not without the knowledge of this government muster a force 
and engage in hostilities with any person : if any dispute arises among you 
respecting " bhow puna " rights, &c., you should quietly refer the matter to 
this government, when His Highness, "with the concurrence of the British 
Resident, will issue the necessary orders in the case, and to which you are to 
conform. , 

Article 8. 

With the exception of the subjects of this government, you are to hold no 
intercourse, nor to carry on correspondence with Bajee Rao Rughoonauth, or 
any other Prince or Chieftain, &c. ; if you do, your country will be resumed. 

Article 9. 

Should an offender from your country take shelter within the territories 
of His Highness you are to report the same to this government, when mea- 



Satara Jaghiredars-Tbe Waekiir— No. CXXXVII. 383 



sures will be taten to apprehend the offender and make him over to you. In 
like manner, offenders from the territories of His Highness or of the British 
Government taking shelter within your jaghire should be immediately appre- 
hended and delivered up by you to whichever government they may 
belong. Further, you are to aid and assist the officers of -either government 
who may enter your jurisdiction in pursuit of offenders. 

Aeticlb 10. 
So long as you continue in good faith and render faithful service, your 
jaghire villages, &c., will be continued to you uninterruptedly by this govern- 
ment, for which you have the guarantee of the British Government, and 
which is agreed to by His Highness. 

Aeticle 11. 

All titles and customary forms of respect hitherto enjoyed by you shall 
be continued. You are to represent all your affairs to this Government ; such 
requests as are reasonable will be granted, and such as are not will be refused. 

Akticlb 12. 
As the territory of His Highness and of the British Government adjoins 
your jaghire, it might be necessary at a future period to effect certain terri- 
torial exchanges, with the advice of the British Resident, for the good of the 
country and for the purpose of defining distinctly the boundaries of the two 
governments ; care being taken to secure you from loss ; you are required to 
agree to this arrangement. 

Aeticle 13. 

You are to attend on His Highness annually at the celebration of the 
Dusserah festival, as also at other times when your presence may be required. 
You are also to accompany His Highness whenever he may proceed on a long 
journey. 

The circumstances contained in the foregoing 13 paragraphs are confirmed. 

Bated Satara, 2\st Ramzan Simnut Ahdee-wu-UsJireen-wu-Myatein-wu-'Olf, 
corresponding with the 3rd July a.d. 1820. 



(Sd.) 



Seal. 



KOLHAPORE AGENCY. 

Irom the Records of tlie Bomhay Government, No. Till, of new series. 
KolJiapore. — The Rajahs of Kolhappre are the representatives of the 
younger branch of the family of Sevajee, as the Rajahs of Satara were of the 
elder. After the death of Rajaram^ Sevajee's younger souj who was the head 
of the Mahratta power during the captivity of his nephew Sahojee^ his widow, 
Tara Bai; placed her son Sevajee in power. He died in 1712^ and was suc- 
ceeded by Sambajee, son of Rajaram's younger widow. The Kolhapore family, 
supported by Ram Chunder Punt Amatya, Surjee Rao Ghatgay of Kagul, and 
other powerful Chiefs, long struggled to retain the supremacy among the 
Mahrattas, but they were compelled to yield precedence to Sahojee, who by 
Treaty* in 1731 recognized Kolhapore as a distinct and independent prin- 
cipality. 

* Partition Treaty of Satara, dated 26t/i April 1731. 

Aeticle I. 
The following Treaty, drawn up between Hia Majesty Aba Saliib (Sahoo Eajah) and 
Sambajee Kajah, has been agreed to on the part of the latter, as hereafter specified. 

Aeticle 2. 
I agree to receive, as my share of the . dominion, that part of the country lying to the 
southward and eastward of the Krishna river below its junction with the Warna, including all 
the forts and posts within the said boundary, and all claims whatsoever. 

Aetiole 3. 
The whole of the country lying south of the junction of the two rivers aforesaid as far as 
the junction of the Toombudra and Krishna, including all the forts and posts within the said 
boundary. 

Aeticle 4. 
The whole of the tract lying south of the fort of Viziadroog. 

Aeticle 5. 

I agree to cede the fort of Rutnagherry, and to receive the fort of Copal in lieu thereof, 
and I will destroy the post at Wurgaum according to agreement. 

Aeticle 6. 
I agree to relinquish the posts in the districts of Mirch and Eeejapoor, now in my possession. 

Aeticle 7. 

I agree to receive the half of any conquests to be made between tlie river Toombudra and 
Eamesliwur. 

Aeticle 8. 

I agi-ee to attack any State which shall engage in war against Satara, and, in like manner, 
the Eajah of Satara agrees to make war with any State attacking this house. 

Aeticle 9. 

I agree to entertain no person discarded from the service of the Eajah of Satara, nor is he 
to entertain any person discarded by me. 

The above nine Articles, being stipulated and mutually agVeed on between both parties, shall 
in no wise be departed from in the least on my part. 

IV 49 



386 Kolhapore Agency— Eolhapore, 

On the death of Sambajee in 1760, the direct descendants of Sevajee 
became extinct. A member of the Bhonsla family was adopted as his succes- 
sor under the name of Sevajee, and the widow of Sambajee conducted the 
administration during the minority. Under her administration the greatest 
irregularities prevailed both by sea and land. 

The prevalence of piracy compelled the British Government to send an 
expedition against Kolhapore in 1765, which resulted in the conclusion of a 
commercial Treaty (No. CXXXVIII.) . The conditions of this Treaty, however, 
were never observed. The payments which Kolhapore had agreed to for the 
expenses of the expedition were not made, piracy was not suppressed, and in 
1792 another expedition was prepared. The Rajah thereupon signed another 
Treaty (No. CXXXIX.), engaging to give compensation for the losses which 
the merchants had sustained from the year 1785, and to permit the establish- 
ment of factories at Malwan and Kolhapore. 

The Ranee died in 1773. After her death, the young Rajah was long 
engaged in war with other Mahratta powers, more particularly the Putwur- 
dhun family, the Sawunt of Waree, aud the Nipaneekur, and his government 
was weakened by internal factious. On several occasions, during these 
struggles, the British Government declined to interfere between the parties. 
But in 1811, during a war between the Nipaneekur and Kolhapore, when 
the British Resident at Poena was engaged in the settlement of the Southern 
Mahratta country, a peace was negotiated between the contending parties, 
and the Rajah of Kolhapore concluded a Treaty (No. CXL.) with the British 
Government, by which, in return for the cession of certain forts, he was 
guaranteed against the aggression of all foreign powers; he also engaged to 
abstain from hostilities with other States, and to refer all his disputes with 
other States to the arbitration of the British Government. 

Sevajee died in 1812, having ruled fifty-three years. He left two sons, 
Sumbhoo or Aba Sahib and Shahjee or Bawa Sahib, and was succeeded by 
the former. In the war with the Peishwa in 1817, Aba Sahib cordially sided 
with the British Government, and in reward for his services the districts of- 
Chikoree and Munolee, which in former years had been wrested from Kolha- 
pore by the Nipaneekur, were restored. In 1821 Aba Sahib was murdered. 
His infant son died the following year, and the succession devolved on Bawa 
Sahib, who proved an oppressive and profligate ruler. Three times between 
1832 and 1829 the British Government was obliged to move a force against 



Kolhapore Agency— Kolhapore. 387 



Lim in consequence of his aggressions on other Chiefsj in which he did not 
respect even British territory, and of the spoliation of his jaghiredars which 
drove them to rebellion. 

In 1826 he signed a Treaty (No. CXLI.), by which he agreed to reduce 
his army to its peace establishment, and to attend to the advice of the British 
Government in all matters afEecting the public peace; to respect the rights 
of certain jaghiredars ; and never to grant an asylum to rebels. On the last 
occasion on which a force was moved against him in 1827, in consequence of 
his infraction of the 2nd Article of the Treaty of 1826, he signed a preliminary 
Treaty (No. CXLII.), subsequently modified (No. CXLIII.), by which 
his army was limited to 400 horse and 800 infantry ; he was stripped of the 
districts of Chikoree and Munolee and of Akeewat; was compelled to admit 
British troops into his forts; to pay Rupees 1,47,948 compensation to certain 
jaghiredars ; to cede lands as security for the payment ; and to accept a minister 
appointed by the British Government. 

Bawa Sahib died on 29th November 1838, and was succeeded by his son 
Sevajee, then a minor. A Council of Eegency was formed, consisting of 
Sevajee's mother, his aunt, and four officials. Soon after the members of the 
Regency quarrelled, and the young Chiefs aunt, Dev?an Sahiba, assumed the 
entire control of the State. The misrule was so great that the British. 
Government, under the provisions of the Treaty, interfered and appointed a 
minister of its own, Dajee Kristna Pundit. The efforts which he made to 
reform the administration resulted in a general rebellion, which extended to 
the neighbouring State of Sawunt Waree. After the suppression of the 
rebellion, the direct administration of the State was assumed by th« British 
Government during the minority of the Rajah, and until he was fit to be 
entrusted with the powers of government and the country could be given 
over to him in a settled and improved condition. The forts of every 
description were dismantled, and the system of hereditary garrisons was 
abolished. The military force of the State was disbanded and a local corps 
entertained in its stead, and the Kolhapore State was required to pay the expense 
of suppressing the rebellion. In 1862 the management was restored to the 
Rajah, with whom a new Treaty (No. CXLIV.) was concluded. By this 
Treaty the Rajah is bound, in all matters of importance, to be guided by the 
advice of the British Government. 



888 Kolhapore Agency— Kolhapore. 

During the mutinies of 1857 the Rajah remained faithful in his alle- 
giance to the British Governmentj but his younger brother, Chimma Sahib, 
joined the rebels. He is now in confinement. 

Rajah Sevajee who had received the right of adoption (No.'XVIII.) died 
in 1866, when the succession of his nephew and adopted son, Raja,raiii, then 
sixteen years of age, was recognized by the British Government. During the 
minority of the young Chief the administration of the State again devolved 
upon the Biitish Government, and a British ofiicer was appointed to superintend 
his education until he should attain the age of nineteen. 

In 1870 Rajah Rajaram proceeded on a tour through Europe, but died 
at Florence in November of that year without leaving any issue. There was 
no near blood relation of the late Chief eligible for adoption, but Government 
declared its willingness to recognize as his successor any person who might 
be selected as most fitting and acceptable to the family and the principal 
persons of the State, even thoiigh he might not fulfil all the conditions 
required' by Hindoo law and the custom of the Kolhapore family. Their 
unanimous choice fell upon Narain Rao Bhonslay, son of Dinkur Rao, the 
head of the Khanvut Bhonslays and next of kin to the Kolhapore family, and 
it was confirmed by the British Government. He was accordingly installed 
as Chief of Kolhapore in October 1871 and took the name of Sevajee. 

Rajah Sevajee is now thirteen years of age. He is being educated under 
the superintendence of a British ofiicer, and the affairs of the State are 

managed during his minority by the Political Agent. 

• 

The area of Kolhapore is about 3,184 square miles, and the population 
803,691 souls. The gross revenue of Kolhapore and its dependencies is 
Rupees 30,47,243, of which about 8i lakhs belong to the dependent 
jaghiredars. 

The Rajah of Kolhapore receives a salute of nineteen guns. 

The military force of the State consists of 67 guns, 36 artillerymen, 154 
cavalry, and 1,503 infantry and police. 



Kolhapore Agency— Southern Mahratta Jaghiredars— fAe Pntwurdhuns. 389 



There are eleven principal feudatories of Kolhapore. In early times the 
internal government of Kolhapore was modelled after that of Sevajee. Most 
of the larger jaghires in Kolhapore are still held by the successors of the old 
ministers of the State, to whom they were originally granted. These jaghire- 
dars pay nuzzerana to the parent State on the occasion of a succession and a 
fixed money contribution in lieu of service. ■ 

Iiisf of the Feudatory Chiefs of Kolhapore. 











■J 


g 






Names of places. 


Names and titles of Chiefs. 




Caste. 


ti 


S 




^ 






1 






t 


















Es. 


Bs. 


Vishalgurh 


Abaji Eao Krishna, Pritinidhee 


7 


Beshasth Brahmiu ... 


236 


32,414 


1,09,638 


5,000 


Bauia 


Madha Eao Moreshwar Bhada- 
nekur, Punt Amatya. 


16 


Ditto ... 


83 


4,3,439 


79,169 


3,420 


Kapshi 


Santaji Eao, Gorepuray, Hindu 
Eao, Mumalkat Madar. 


27 


Mahratta ... 




11,117 


40,919 


1,400 


Kagul 


Jaishing Eao Ghatgay 


18 


Ditto 


129 


42,046 


1,69,491 


2,000 


Inchal Kutui^ji ... 


Govind Eao Kesheo Gorepuray 


22 


Konkanasht Brahmin.. 


201 


69,330 


2,12,235 


2,000 


Torgal 


Subhan Eao Shinde, Sena Khas- 
. kil. 


48' 


Mahratta ... 


130 


16,213 


37,612 


835 


Datawud 


Narain Eao, Gorepuray, Ameer- 
ool Omra. 


36 


Ditto ... 




2,646 


16,360 




Ditto 


Eanoji Eao, Himmat Bahadoor, 
Chawan. 


i\ 


Ditto 




12,469 


64,074 


"2,066 


Kagul 


Narain Eao, Ghatgay, SaqaEao 


a. 


Ditto ... 




5,766 


54,786 






Gopal Eao, Nimbalkur, Sar 
Lashkar. 


20 


Ditto 




6,784 


33,050 


1,162 






Nagoj i Eao, Patankar 


34 


Ditto 




5,882 


14,106 









Under the Kolhapore Agency are the Southern Mahratta jaghiredars who 
consist of three large families, the Putwurdhun, the Bhawa, and the Gorepuray. 
Of these the Putwurdhun Chief of Sanglee enjoys first class jurisdiction, having 
power to try for capital offences any' persons except British subjects. The 
others have second class jurisdiction, having power to try for capital offences 
their own subjects only. 

The founder of the Putwurdhun family was Huree ,Bhut, a Con- 
canee Brahmin, who became the family priest of the Gorepurays of 
Inchal Kurunji, and whose three sons Govind Pluree, Ramchunder Huree, 
and Trimbuk Huree, rose to military command under the first Peishwa and 



390 Kolhapore Agency— Southern Mahratta Jaghiredars— Me Fwlwwrdlmm. 

received grants of land on condition oE military service. The first grant of 
land, which was of the value of Rupees 25,20,568, was in the name of 
Goviud Huree, but the Peishwa subsequently divided it in unequal portions 
between Govind Huree and his two nephews, Pursram Bhow, the most 
celebrated of all the Mahratta generals, son of Ramchunder Rao, and 
Neelkunt Rao, son of Trimbuk Huree. To Govind Huree was assigned 
Meeruj, to Pursram Bhow was given -Tasgaon, and Kurundwad to Neelkunt 
Rao. 

In 1782 Meeruj descended to Chintamun Rao, grandson of Govind Huree, 
a child of six years of age ; during his minority the estate was managed by 
his uncle Gungadhur Rao. When Chintamun Rao came of age he quarrelled 
with his uncle, who attempted to keep him out of his rights. Eventually the 
estate was divided between them, the uncle retaining Meeruj, and Chintamun 
Rao taking Sanglee. The revenues of Sanglee were Rupees 6,35,178, and of 
Meeruj Rupees 4,79,798, and these estates were respectively subject to a 
service of 1,920 and 1,219 horse. 

On the death of Pursram Bhow of Tasgaon the estate descended to his 
son Ramchunder; but in the year 1811 a share was given by the Peishwa to 
Gunput Rao, a younger son. Two estates were thus formed, Jamkhundi, 
held by Ramchunder, yielding a revenue of Rupees 4,54,160 and subject to a 
service of 1,278 horse, and Tasgaon, with a revenue of Rupees 2,08,776, held 
by Gunput Rao, subject to a service of 640 horse. 

In 1812 the estate of Kurundwad was also divided, a half share, 
Shedbal, being given by the Peishwa to Gunput Rao, the nephew of Neelkunt 
Rao. The Kurundwad share yielded a revenue of Rupees 1,27,989, and was 
subject to a service of 280 horse. The revenues of Shedbal were Rupees 
1,00,691, and the contingent due was 280 horse. 

The power of the Putwurdhuns _had for some time excited the jealousy 
of the Peishwa, who attempted to strip them of their rights. Rebellion was 
several times threatened, and at last in 1812 the Putwurdhuns asked the 
interference of the British Government. Through the mediation of Mr. 
Elphinstpne an Engagement (No. CXLV.) was drawn up, by which the 
family, together with the other jaghiredars of the Southern Mahratta 
country, were secured in their possessions on condition of rendering stipulated 
service, and the Peishwa engaged to abstain from interference with their 
administration. 



£olhapore Agency— Southern Mahratta Jaghiredars— 2'Ae Pwtwnrdlmns. 391 

At the time of the Peishwa's overthrow, therefore, there were six 
separate estates held by members of the Putwurdhun family. With the 
Chiefs of these estates three Engagements (Nos. CXLVI,, CXLVII., and 
CXLVIII.) were concluded in 1819, by which the number of horsemen they 
were required to furnish was reduced to one-fourth, and in lieu of the 
others, cash was to be paid at the rate of Rupees 300 for each horse, or land 
was to be assigned. The engagements also bound them to dependence on the 
British Government, to whom all quarrels were to be referred. With excep- 
tion of the Chief of Sanglee, who gave up lands yielding Rupees 1,35>000, 
all the others elected to furnish the contingents required. 

In 1820 the estate of Meeruj was, with the sanction of the British 
Government, divided into four shares, and the service of horse proportionately 
assigned. Two of these shares lapsed in 1842 and 1845 from failure of male 
issue, and two now remain, one held by Gungadhur Rao of Meeruj, and the 
other by Luchmun Rao Appa Saheb. 

The Jamkhundi estate also was divided in 1821 by the formation of 
the separate estate of Chinehnee, which was assigned to Govind Rao Nana 
Saheb, nephew of Ramchunder Rao. Chinehnee lapsed in 1836. Tasgaon 
also lapsed in 1848. 

In the remaining estates the maintenance of a contingent force was 
commuted (No. CXLIX.) in 1849 to a money payment. 

The estate of Shedbal, after having once been continued by adoption 
in 1820, lapsed in 1850. 

In 1854 a further division of the Kurundwad State was effected by 
Government between Roghonath Rao and his nephew, Gunput Rao, and 
two younger brothers, Venayak Rao and Timbak Raoj the latter having 
died in 1869 without male issue, his share of the saranjam was bestowed on 
the two younger Chiefs, and the portion of inam holdings reverted to the 
elder Chief. 

The Putwurdhun family, with exception of the Chief of Jamkhundi, 
whose conduct was suspicious, behaved well in tte mutinies of 1857. To 
each of them the perpetua